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Projects Repair cracks in a 1939 Ford Deluxe steering wheel

Discussion in 'Traditional Hot Rods' started by MIKE STEWART, Jan 19, 2019.

  1. MIKE STEWART
    Joined: Aug 23, 2016
    Posts: 219

    MIKE STEWART

    I have an original 1939 Ford Banjo steering wheel - good shape except for the cracks along the outer portion. What is best method to repair / fill these cracks.

    Thanks

    Mike
     
  2. flatford39
    Joined: Dec 3, 2006
    Posts: 2,201

    flatford39
    Member

    There are some really good threads on that if you look. I know the search engine here is not very good but if use googles it will most likely bring you back here. If I remember some people just used Rage and some used an epoxy.
     
    48fordnut likes this.
  3. Seems like I remember someone selling a kit (maybe Eastwood) that included a two-part epoxy and some sandpaper sheets.
     
  4. 66gmc
    Joined: Dec 4, 2005
    Posts: 421

    66gmc
    Member
    from saskatoon

    025.jpg This wheel was badly split and cracked all the way around. I V'ed out all the cracks with a die grinder, then sandblasted the steel rim with a small spot blaster. To fill the cracks I used Pc7 2 part epoxy, actually most of the wheel ended up being made of it, then I used regular automotive filler to touch up any pinholes and imperfections. Very time consuming but it held up under 3 years of hard driving. Also wear a respirator, whatever material ford used on those wheels smells horrific when you grind it.
     
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  5. 18n57
    Joined: Jun 29, 2007
    Posts: 554

    18n57
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    MIKE STEWART likes this.
  6. MIKE STEWART
    Joined: Aug 23, 2016
    Posts: 219

    MIKE STEWART

    looks great - just ordered some PC-7 online.
     
    66gmc likes this.
  7. 34steeringwheel.jpg I made the mistake of using JB weld. After being stored in a warm storage garage for one year, the JB weld cracked at every place it was used.
     
    lothiandon1940 likes this.
  8. Super glue and baking soda.... seriously. Thoroughly wet the area with glue, then shake baking soda over it. It will dry instantly. Repeat until filled, let it cure for 24 hours, then sand to shape.
     
  9. I used the PC7 on mine that was very badly cracked. I have manual steering so the wheel sees a lot of force at low speeds. I also grab the top of the wheel tight when I row the 4-speed. I now have cracks showing up again, but minor.
     
  10. Joe Blow
    Joined: Oct 29, 2016
    Posts: 21

    Joe Blow
    Member

    Here's a good video that follows along the lines of the other responses.

     
  11. Nice video. I have never seen that POR15 product before and it seems to have moisture-cure properties. So it will stick better than conventional epoxy putty.
     
  12. brigrat
    Joined: Nov 9, 2007
    Posts: 4,740

    brigrat
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Wa.St.

    Last edited: Jan 20, 2019
  13. ronzmtrwrx
    Joined: Sep 9, 2008
    Posts: 398

    ronzmtrwrx
    Member

    1E9609C6-78F1-4B7E-A5A1-61811E033594.jpeg EFF4D209-57E8-430B-A177-5EB0EF4EBAD0.jpeg
    Not a banjo wheel, but I used PC7 also followed up with a couple coats of epoxy primer, then single stage urethane in this 36 wheel. Haven’t put it into service yet, so I can’t say if it’s gonna hold, but I’m happy with how it came out looks wise.
     
    flyin-t, rod1, dana barlow and 3 others like this.
  14. mr.chevrolet
    Joined: Jul 19, 2006
    Posts: 6,297

    mr.chevrolet
    Member

    here's 2 spinner wheels that i've been patching. the maroonish one has what i remember as PC7 as the
    tan filler with black JB-Weld on it. you can see the tan stuff has cracked. it's been sitting about 2 years waiting for me to get back to it.
    the tan wheel has this 3M product that has been sitting in my basement for who knows how long. it just happens to be a similar color to the original wheel. it takes about 4-5 days for it to fully harden. i'll use a Dremel tool with sanding discs to smooth it out and add to it as needed.
     

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  15. foureverlow
    Joined: May 21, 2010
    Posts: 28

    foureverlow
    Member
    from OKC
    1. Okie Hambers

    51 Buick wheel I restored used plastic filler only not its trying to come apart lol gotta redo it and use that epoxy for sure [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  16. brigrat
    Joined: Nov 9, 2007
    Posts: 4,740

    brigrat
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Wa.St.

    "looks great - just ordered some PC-7 online."

    Looks like it's best to let the thread play out before ordering anything!
     
    MIKE STEWART and foureverlow like this.
  17. PC7 and V the cracks is good advice but I'd add go easy on the epoxy. Its a bitch to sand, try not to go crazy and over fill to much as you'll just create more work sanding. Small imperfections can be fine tuned w regular body filler after the PC7.

    Sent from my SM-J727T1 using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  18. This is an excellent trick that really works. It is very strong and the powder makes it set very quickly. It is strong enough that you can use it to repair frets on a guitar.
    Bob
     
  19. ronzmtrwrx
    Joined: Sep 9, 2008
    Posts: 398

    ronzmtrwrx
    Member

    Hmm I’ve never heard of that trick but it sounds interesting. I’m going to have to try that on something. Thanks for sharing that.


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  20. brigrat
    Joined: Nov 9, 2007
    Posts: 4,740

    brigrat
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Wa.St.

    Instead of baking soda you can use "Micro Balloons", their microscopic plastic round sphere's sold in most Hobby/Craft stores. More expensive than soda BUT instead of powder it's plastic and fills more solid.....................................
     
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  21. Dak Rat
    Joined: Mar 8, 2006
    Posts: 343

    Dak Rat
    Member

    Here is a little trick I used. After you V the crack and put the epoxy into the crack, take a strip of plastic kitchen wrap and wrap it around the epoxy. It will pull the epoxy into the crack and keeps the stuff from dripping out the bottom. The PC7 won't stick to the plastic and after it sets up just peel it off. Makes for less sanding because the plastic will smooth out the repair area. Worked for me.
     
  22. That's a twist I haven't seen yet. But I've had no issues with using soda; it's strong enough that I've used it to rebuild a plastic latch assembly where the last 1/4" of the male half of the latch was missing (the 'hook' that actually latched it had been broken off) by building up a 'glob' on the end of the latch then filed/sanded it back to the shape of the hook. Don't even attempt trying that with epoxy.

    I have used a popsickle stick to 'pack' the baking soda into the joint... just don't use your fingers! LOLOL...
     
  23. brigrat
    Joined: Nov 9, 2007
    Posts: 4,740

    brigrat
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Wa.St.

    The Micro balloons gives the super glue more solid "body" when cured..........................
     
  24. ronzmtrwrx
    Joined: Sep 9, 2008
    Posts: 398

    ronzmtrwrx
    Member

    We have a Hobby Lobby nearby. I'll look for some of these. I'm assuming they will be in the craft section. I'd like to give these a try.
     
  25. deucemac
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 951

    deucemac
    Member

    Watched a friend repair a badly cracked banjo wheel. It was a mess and he used bowling ball putty! It when in a restored show car after that and looked spectacular. I remembered that all these years but necessary had a wheel that needed repair to try it.
     
  26. gimpyshotrods
    Joined: May 20, 2009
    Posts: 15,983

    gimpyshotrods
    Member

    I have been using PC-7, for about 30-years.

    No issues, yet.
     
    DeLuxe 32 and MIKE STEWART like this.

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