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Working with brass

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Mindover, Oct 21, 2011.

  1. jdustu
    Joined: Sep 1, 2008
    Posts: 726

    jdustu
    Member

    Outstanding work David.
     
  2. delaware1930
    Joined: Jan 20, 2011
    Posts: 105

    delaware1930
    Member
    from Delaware

    Very nice a true craftsman.
     
  3. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,536

    Mindover
    Member
    from England




    The welding method I have use in the past does leave the weld a different colour than the rest of the shell ( you can see it in the photos if you look closely) This has never been a problem because all the shells I make are chrome plated. I have recently had to change the welding rod and flux because health and safety rules have changed and the rods I have used for the last twenty odd years are no longer available. The colour match is better with the new set up.

    David
     
  4. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,536

    Mindover
    Member
    from England

    Josh, I just spent my lunch break looking at your metal sculptures, You have a very good imagination and I really like your stuff, I especially like the die grinder salt lake car.

    David
     
  5. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,536

    Mindover
    Member
    from England

    For welding brass (or bronze welding of steel) you need an oxidising flame.


    I will explain more when I show the process.

    David
     
  6. jdustu
    Joined: Sep 1, 2008
    Posts: 726

    jdustu
    Member

    Thanks man! I truly appreciate that.

    I'm hoping to work on my shaping skills, and really dig brass and copper. You're work is incredible. Something to aspire to. Thanks for posting.
     
  7. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,536

    Mindover
    Member
    from England

    For the SS100 Radiator shell I start with a sheet of soft brass in a half hard state.
    From this I cut my blanks. Below is a photo of the six sections that the shell is made from...

    [​IMG]

    Each one of these sections has to be formed to shape then each one is welded to the next, all the welds are dressed until I have a metal finish.

    David
     
  8. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,536

    Mindover
    Member
    from England

    This is one half of the top of a SS100 Radiator shell. I hollow the brass over a stump to put some shape into it. Hollowing stretches the metal where the blow is struck and the edges pucker, the puckers are dressed out causing the metal to shrink into itself so the panel is part stretched and part shrunk to shape.


    [​IMG]

    David
     
  9. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,536

    Mindover
    Member
    from England

    The next stage is to planish the panel to smooth out the lumps and the puckers, this process may be repeated to achieve the correct shape. Below I am dressing the part to shape on a 'stake'.

    [​IMG]

    Once the shape is roughed out more planishing is done to make the panel as smooth as possible so that the shape is accurate. The shape is checked on my jig.


    David
     
  10. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,536

    Mindover
    Member
    from England

    Where did everyone go? lol.

    David
     
  11. We are hear waiting for the next step.
     
  12. WOW - Just WOW!

    How long does it take to make one of those Jag Grille Shells?
     
  13. cactus1
    Joined: Apr 10, 2006
    Posts: 7,984

    cactus1
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I've got my ear defenders on and I'm waiting for more!
     
  14. neilswheels
    Joined: Aug 26, 2006
    Posts: 449

    neilswheels
    Member
    from England

    I've done some brass work at work, interior handrals and some bathroon fittings. I'm interested in what you do for welding. I've tried Tig-ing the stuff, it was a nightmare, horrible fumes and weak joints. I was obviously doing it wrong, but had no one to guide me, so was guessing. All the handrail stuff i silver solder, which works well, cleans up and polishes well for plating, as long as there are no pin holes. So what do you use to weld brass? Really nice work by the way.
     
  15. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,536

    Mindover
    Member
    from England

    Thanks for your interest guys, all questions should be answered by the end of this explanation about the shells.

    The part is worked on the stake until it is 'roughed out...

    [​IMG]

    More hollowing and planishing to put the correct shape in...

    [​IMG]

    Here is the part pictured on the jig or 'buck' it is getting close to the final shape at this stage...

    [​IMG]

    The jig is looking worse for wear but I have made well over two hundred shells on it in the last twenty three years or so since I built it.

    Because of the shape of this part it is formed without machines, it is too tight and complex a shape to do any other way. It is possible to make just about any panel in the same way. It is not necessary to have large machines to get a good result. There is some footage of me doing these techniques on youtube -click the link below. I can be seen working on one of these shells.

    David
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2011
  16. noboD
    Joined: Jan 29, 2004
    Posts: 6,189

    noboD
    Member

    David, thanks for taking the time to show your work. Quite impressive.
     
  17. willymakeit
    Joined: Apr 13, 2009
    Posts: 1,280

    willymakeit
    Member

    Incredible talent and years of hard work. Keep the posts coming.
     
  18. temper_mental
    Joined: Oct 22, 2006
    Posts: 2,719

    temper_mental
    Member
    from Texas

  19. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 22,514

    The37Kid
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    When Henry offered the plated radiator shell as an option in 1926 they were made of brass. I've always thought that was a cost saving decision. The plated shells have round holes for the hood lacing the steel ones are punched square. This is an easy way to tell one from the other quickly. Glad noboD told me about this thread, like many HAMB threads the title is sometimes deceiving, I've always liked the looks of the SS 100, glad you are helping wish the restorations. What's the story on the Bugatti GP car along side the one in the photo? Thanks for sharing your skills with us. Bob:)
     
  20. oj
    Joined: Jul 27, 2008
    Posts: 5,453

    oj
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Wow, that is just right - perfect is what you get with some cnc machining but when something is just right it is beyond physically correct. Like the individual pieces that make up a 'Bug', they're just right and cannot be improved on.
     
  21. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,536

    Mindover
    Member
    from England

    Hi Bob I didn't intend to put all this in here. I would change the title if I could. I don't know how.

    The other car is a little MG. I have another thread I did a while ago that you may find interesting if you have not seen it. I show the MG in that thread. I also show a Sunbeam GP car I built a body for. Here is a link...

    http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=526153

    David
     
  22. fordcragar
    Joined: Dec 28, 2005
    Posts: 3,122

    fordcragar
    Member

    I used to work for a guy that would take in any job he thought he could make money at; whether or not he could do the job. Many times the guys working for him refused to work on the project and he would fumble through it. Sometimes he was somewhat successful and other times not.
     
  23. fordcragar
    Joined: Dec 28, 2005
    Posts: 3,122

    fordcragar
    Member

    David, the only way to change the title would be to have a admin or moderator change it.
     
  24. fryguy
    Joined: Nov 26, 2005
    Posts: 1,231

    fryguy
    Member

    David, a true craftsmen of the metal. Very informative and looking forward to seeing more regarding the welding of the brass. I was wondering if you ever did a brass deuce shell before? I would love to have one on my roadster.


    -Fryguy
     
  25. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,536

    Mindover
    Member
    from England

    Hi Larry, thanks for your input. Looks like it will have to stay as it is then. I dont know if the customer paid for the work they did but I know I would not have paid for crap work so no money in it. I do know pleny of peopl who do poor work and get away with it but ruining something that belongs to someone else...

    David
     
  26. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,536

    Mindover
    Member
    from England

    Thanks for the input guys I appreciate the comments.

    David
     
  27. happy hoppy
    Joined: Apr 23, 2001
    Posts: 2,320

    happy hoppy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    beautiful work. thank you for sharing.
     
  28. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 22,514

    The37Kid
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Just got back from going through the Riley/Sunbeam build thread, two more great projects you turned out. The cycle fender section was very interesting. Years ago I had a rather rough 1933 Lagonda with Helmet style front cycle fenders, some day I'd like to make a pair for a future project. The Lagonda went down the road over 30 years ago, that was a mistake now that I think about it.
     
  29. Mindover
    Joined: Jan 18, 2009
    Posts: 1,536

    Mindover
    Member
    from England

    Cheers guys, I am glad you liked the other thread The37kid. I have worked on most Marques of car but not a Lagonda. I almost did a couple of times but for whatever reason it never happened.

    I will post some more tomorrow if I have time.

    David
     
  30. falconsprint63
    Joined: May 17, 2007
    Posts: 2,263

    falconsprint63
    Member
    from Mayberry

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