Register now to get rid of these ads!

History Willys Model 77 (1933-1936) roadsters - did they sell them in the United States?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Bigcheese327, Nov 7, 2008.

  1. Bigcheese327
    Joined: Sep 16, 2001
    Posts: 6,558

    Bigcheese327
    Member

    [​IMG]

    I've seen a fairly large number of Willys coupes and sedans from this era, but the few roadsters I've seen all seem to be from Australia. Did they actually make a Willys roadster in the U.S. during this time period, or were they strictly available "down under"?

    They're a handsome little car, I think, but they all seem to get the "street rod" treatment.

    -Dave
     
  2. Bigcheese327
    Joined: Sep 16, 2001
    Posts: 6,558

    Bigcheese327
    Member

    [​IMG]

    Bump for the after-work crowd.

    -Dave
     
  3. mgtstumpy and kidcampbell71 like this.
  4. montclaire
    Joined: Jul 24, 2007
    Posts: 495

    montclaire
    Member

    What a cool car
     
    Register now to get rid of these ads!

  5. Weasel
    Joined: Dec 30, 2007
    Posts: 6,709

    Weasel
    Member

    Hey Jimmy B, thanks for posting pix - that's my black '33 as it came out of the upholstery shop. Here's some shots of it before it was repainted

    Holden's were the only people to make Willys Model 77 roadsters and production is quoted at 74 units for 1933. There are maybe eight or nine originals left in existence.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Bruce Lancaster
    Joined: Oct 9, 2001
    Posts: 21,454

    Bruce Lancaster
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    An odd source...look for stuff on the '32-34 roadster stackcar racing. There's a good article in HRM about '51, several other modern articles. Seems there was a Willys roadster in that--I'm thinking there's a TINY picture in a shot showing a lot of cars, and I seem to remember thinking it looked like a quick hack job to fit the rules...anybody able to post that ancient, grainy picture??
    The series died because all winners were always Fords, and in some races all Fords finished before anything else...a '33 Ford capable of passing teardown could touch 100 and lap a half oval/half roadrace couse in the eighties!
    A Willys with its little four would likely have been about at last place, since Willys did not yet offer the blown hemi option...
     
  7. Bigcheese327
    Joined: Sep 16, 2001
    Posts: 6,558

    Bigcheese327
    Member

    Bruce, the second picture I posted is from that race series. There was an article on it in Special Interest Autos in the 1970s.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    -Dave
     
  8. Bruce Lancaster
    Joined: Oct 9, 2001
    Posts: 21,454

    Bruce Lancaster
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    No...I have that article somewhere...that article is on a brief outbreak of sporty car roadracing at the time, a mix of European stuff (some of that antique already!) and small USA cars stripped down.
    The Stock Car series was strictly new or nearly new USA cars, fenders removed...cars were all '32-33 USA, maybe '34's...I think Mines Field (approx) was their big track, a looong oval on one side and wavy roadcourse on the others. It was a big dollar promotional thing involving the manufacturers. Cars were torn down for inspection of stock specs...I'm sure the 100 MPH Fords were a bit tweaked, but everything in them had to look stock enough to fool the inspectors. All the bigger makes were represented.
    The promotional aspect failed utterly due to total domination by Ford.
     
  9. sawzall
    Joined: Jul 15, 2002
    Posts: 4,593

    sawzall
    Member

    OMG..

    that willys highboy is cool as hell..

    un loading a race car from the woodie.. even better

    thanks for posting..

    sawzall
     
  10. Bigcheese327
    Joined: Sep 16, 2001
    Posts: 6,558

    Bigcheese327
    Member

    I'd love to read that article, it makes me think of this one:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    It's about stock car races held in Eglin, IL in '33 in conjunction with the Chicago World's Fair. No Willys cars here, though, the field is 11 Fords, 2 Chevrolets, 1 Plymouth, and 1 Dodge according to the article.

    The Ford domination makes sense, though. I had call to look through a '34 edition of the Muskegon Chronicle not too long ago and there was a great 1/8 page advertisement for Ford automobiles bragging about their racing success and featuring a drawing of a fenderless Model 40. I really should go back and have it printed off, maybe to get it blown up and framed.

    -Dave
     
  11. Weasel
    Joined: Dec 30, 2007
    Posts: 6,709

    Weasel
    Member

    Here's my yard ornament.... pair of Brooklands aero screens, bomber seats and quad E&Js on fabricated posts and we're rolling Batman...:D


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    mgtstumpy and kidcampbell71 like this.
  12. Bruce Lancaster
    Joined: Oct 9, 2001
    Posts: 21,454

    Bruce Lancaster
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    The Elgin pics are the stock car series of about '32-34...coverage in December '51 HRM, I found it last night right under a cat. Rodders were into history even back then. Cover photo shows 2, maybe 3 77 roadsters in tiny, grainy view, identifiable only by the huge spare tire cutout. There's no way to tell how they became roadsters, whether they are some sort of true roadster or sawn off coupes. Look at those results! De Palma and Shaw way down in the pack! Probably confused by the transmission and not being able to find the hand-pump...
     
  13. Weasel
    Joined: Dec 30, 2007
    Posts: 6,709

    Weasel
    Member

    To refine the response to the original question, no factory convertible Willys is known to have been produced in the U.S. - Willys have shown artist's renditions of cars in their brochures which they either never produced, or did not introduce until later model years. I have found no evidence of the Panel Delivery being produced before 1935 (with the revised front styling) and yet it is shown as an artists sketch, as a 1933 style model, in the 1933 brochure - fully two years before it hit production.

    The convertible or cabriolet (wind up windows) sketch in the 1933 brochure (see image below) probably never even made it to concept model, and I think it would be fairly safe to accept that anything in vintage road racing in the U.S. would have likely been a coupe with the roof cut off and not one of the Right Hand Drive roadsters from Holden's in Australia.

    [​IMG]
     
    mgtstumpy and kidcampbell71 like this.
  14. bobs36hotrod
    Joined: Nov 18, 2007
    Posts: 34

    bobs36hotrod
    Member

    1933 Roadster I want one.
    Bobs36hotrod
     
  15. khead47
    Joined: Mar 29, 2010
    Posts: 1,421

    khead47
    Member

    what bobs36hotrod said.
     
  16. 32fenderless
    Joined: Jun 7, 2007
    Posts: 160

    32fenderless
    Member

    I have been checking these out recently. Thinking I need to start gathering parts to build one. To me is looks like these roadster quarters have more of an arc than the coupes. Seems like the coupe quarter has a better flow. Can anyone confirm this or is it just the profiles I am looking at are throwing me off.
    IMG_1477534238.395296.jpg IMG_1477534247.621571.jpg


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  17. Bigcheese327
    Joined: Sep 16, 2001
    Posts: 6,558

    Bigcheese327
    Member

    I think the roadster bodies were Holden built, so a Toledo- (Willys) bodied roadster would likely share the trunk profile of the coupe.
     
  18. Bigcheese327
    Joined: Sep 16, 2001
    Posts: 6,558

    Bigcheese327
    Member

    Here's a de-coupe-tated Willys 77 racing at Mines Field in the early '30s.

    1934 Willys 77 Mines Field 03.jpg
     

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2013 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.