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Why no Buick OHV straight 8s?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by bluthndr, Aug 30, 2012.

  1. ol fueler
    Joined: Oct 6, 2005
    Posts: 935

    ol fueler
    Member

    You miss the MOST important development in engine design of the period around 1949 or so --- THE ONE THING that allowed the short stroke, compact , smaller and lighter , stronger ,more powerful engines of that era. No--- it was not Overhead valves the real breakthru was the SLIPPER Piston! Bet that won't help many of you understand why or what it is or meant to engine design. Can some one fill in the details?
     
  2. PackardV8
    Joined: Jun 7, 2007
    Posts: 877

    PackardV8
    Member

    ? Never heard that one before, because some of the taller OHV8s didn't use the slipper piston, but kept the full skirts. The slipper skirt piston was a necessity, not necessarily a virtue. A shorter block deck height design required pistons to coexist with crankshaft counterweights. The designers decided how tall the engine had to be, how long the stroke had to be, then just cut away the piston skirt until it cleared and then learned how to make them live.

    Your opinions may vary.

    jack vines
     
  3. rowdyauto
    Joined: Jun 1, 2005
    Posts: 301

    rowdyauto
    Member

    Stock valve cover just plated,I guess I'll try a video, each pipe exits in front of each rear tire so has a little different sound.
     
  4. Jenz38
    Joined: Dec 21, 2010
    Posts: 81

    Jenz38
    Member

    Here my '38 ,I'm very alone with my fast Str.8 here in Germany (under the V 8's). It's hard to get Parts for.
    That is the Salt in the Soup for me.

    [​IMG]

    Guys told its look like a Cathedral .

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Spud
    Joined: Oct 13, 2006
    Posts: 123

    Spud
    Member
    from Ohio

    [​IMG]

    Jenz car looks good, do you run with the hood sides off your was you working on it
     
  6. 39cent
    Joined: Apr 4, 2006
    Posts: 1,569

    39cent
    Member
    from socal

    The main thing concerning Buick straight 8,s is that they were a performance car from the very beginning. Starting with overhead or as they were first known as 'valve in head' engines with hot little 4 cyl jobs to begin with. The first time I got interested in them was in the 50's seeing a 39 Century coupe tear up the F stock class at Colton drag strip. Basically the Buick engine is similar to the GMC six in many ways. In the early drags the GMC was just getting a rep as one of the fastest hot rod engines, that is till an new engine from Chrysler showed up. but I recall guys had stock body '40 to '47 stick shift Roadmasters, showing tailites on the street [my 40 did]. Simply get a 41 dual intake exhaust setup, mill the head .125 or more and you were even faster. Today there are still some Buick strt 8,s going fast and breaking recordse, one that I know about is Gerry Duttweiler,s blown 38 Century coupe, who has turned 117 in low 11's, [and now has to put in roll bars to run], also Salt Cat guys are over 200 mph at Bonneville with thier race car, what more needs to be said. seems like a lotta guys that lost thier 'boat anchors' missed the boat. As far as the argument about flathead vs. overhead jobs GM used both types but seems the OHV,s were most succesful in racing, ie chevy ohv 4, broke landspeed records at 140 mph, and GMC,s and Buicks still setting records in thier class.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2013
  7. caddy346
    Joined: Feb 17, 2007
    Posts: 29

    caddy346
    Member

    Ive Got a HA/GR runnin 248 Stocker, And i mean bog stock '39 smelly fummey hi-milage engine (all i could find when first built the car) Done a 15.9 quater and thort that was ok. Got a fairly fresh 41 248 with dual carbs now and even a low milage '50 320 and the cream on the cake a NOS Howard 6X2! Just lost motivation sence every every1 turns a blind eye unless ya run like sub 8's (not many GET it over Here!)
     
  8. Six Ball
    Joined: Oct 8, 2007
    Posts: 3,028

    Six Ball
    Member
    from Nevada

    As long as you get it, screw the rest!:cool:
     
  9. 48SuperConvert
    Joined: Jan 17, 2011
    Posts: 107

    48SuperConvert
    Member
    from Seattle

    I'm getting close to putting mine on the road. Fired it up for the first time before Christmas an it runs like a top. It's a 48 convertable with a 248 and 4 speed with a 9" rear end.
     

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  10. nali
    Joined: Sep 15, 2009
    Posts: 828

    nali
    Member

    Really nice !
    I suppose the intake and exhaust are home made ?
    I also hope you ll make a video to hear the dual exhaust :)
    Which trans did you use ?

    Edit : found your topic about the trans.
     
  11. atch
    Joined: Sep 3, 2002
    Posts: 4,339

    atch
    Member

    are these the two cars i used to see in davenport at the mississippi valley fairgrounds when they ran the old cars there?

    if so i remember spending a lot of time looking at them; & being a little jealous of the driver(s).
     
  12. 48SuperConvert
    Joined: Jan 17, 2011
    Posts: 107

    48SuperConvert
    Member
    from Seattle

    Hell's Gate Hot Rods made the intake manifold and the exhaust flanges. I did the headers.
    My transmission is a A-833 New Proccess 4 speed from a 82 C-10 Chev pickup. It has fairly low gears on 1-3 and a overdrive ratio on 4th (.75:1). Hopefully it will keep the rpms down at freeway speeds.
    I'm not too good at videos but I will try and post one.
     
  13. nali
    Joined: Sep 15, 2009
    Posts: 828

    nali
    Member

    Just curious, what gas millage to expect when driving daily a 248 / 263 / 320 ?
    I understand it won t be the same on a big 4 doors 1950 or a 1940 Coupé ...
     
  14. 48SuperConvert
    Joined: Jan 17, 2011
    Posts: 107

    48SuperConvert
    Member
    from Seattle

    Gas mileage...Good question. I'm hoping that is will be somewhat economical. I'm using Stromberg 97's jetted fairly low with progressive linkage so I think that will help. The motor is a 248 bored .30 over. No power house but I hope a good driver.
    Do you know what kind of mileage that they got new?? That would be great to know as a base line.
    The bad thing with a convertable is that it is so darn heavy @ 4250 lbs.
     
  15. Doodlrodz
    Joined: Feb 6, 2006
    Posts: 1,440

    Doodlrodz
    Member Emeritus

    Not sure if this is a Buick or not but looks big enough to be.
     

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  16. Jonnie King
    Joined: Aug 12, 2007
    Posts: 2,077

    Jonnie King
    Member
    from St. Louis

    My '53 Buick Special was not a racer or a custom. I pretty much just restored it because it was so cool & beautiful as it was. Really loved that car !

    AND, it had a 263 Straight Eight in it (which had been in the '52 Supers, but was in the '53 Specials then as '53 was the year that Buick introduced the V-8 Nailhead used in Supers & Roadmasters.) That was one some running mutha' ! With as much torque as you would need !

    What some forget is that, in many areas of the Country, the Buick Straight Eight was used for Industrial purposes: sawmills, construction sites, etc.

    And, yes, as shown in some of the pix posted here, there were some in racers...but, as has been stated earlier, they were long & heavy which was a deterrent to many.

    Jonnie www.legends.thewwbc.net
     

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  17. MotorVillain
    Joined: Dec 18, 2011
    Posts: 60

    MotorVillain
    Member


    That engine looks FANTASTIC! keep us up to date with your progress!
     
  18. Six Ball
    Joined: Oct 8, 2007
    Posts: 3,028

    Six Ball
    Member
    from Nevada

    I've known two guys that had '48 Buick convertibles. They both had big block Chevys. :(
     
  19. oldwood
    Joined: Mar 13, 2010
    Posts: 899

    oldwood
    Member
    from arkansas

    My '50 Buick Sedanette is not known for gas mileage but that is not why I bought it!!! Like others, let's hear that -8 run.
     
  20. rocksolidnate
    Joined: Feb 4, 2013
    Posts: 121

    rocksolidnate
    Member
    from Viroqua Wi

    48chevroterco likes this.
  21. Bearing Burner
    Joined: Mar 2, 2009
    Posts: 856

    Bearing Burner
    Member
    from W. MA

    Talk about industrial uses. I worked in a paper mill 25 years ago that had a Buick st8 engine powering a backup flood pump.
     
  22. This is my Dad's 1952 Roadmaster.
    [​IMG] They just drove it from Phoenix, Arizona to Mt. Vernon, Washington here a few weeks ago. It was about 1550 miles, and it took them 3 days. It has the 320 with the Dynaflow. The 320 has the stock 1952 only 4bbl intake with the stock Rochester. Dad said he averaged about 12mpg.
     
  23. nali
    Joined: Sep 15, 2009
    Posts: 828

    nali
    Member

    12 mpg with a 320 ... Thanks for the info.
     
  24. They're smooooth and quiet. I actually got bumped into by an old man driving one at a car show. No idea there was a car creepin' up behind me. Think it was a 48 or 49 fastback.
     
  25. 48SuperConvert
    Joined: Jan 17, 2011
    Posts: 107

    48SuperConvert
    Member
    from Seattle

    Nice looking ride. I bet it rides smooth. 12 miles per gallon...I've had cars that have done worse. Thanks for the info !!
     
  26. kuhn1941
    Joined: Feb 15, 2013
    Posts: 194

    kuhn1941
    Member

    I hope to fix my gas millage with some custom headers , I have been threw 3 sets of exhaust manifolds on my 248 compound carb straight eight . I drive it often and sometimes an hour one way to car shows . Now I have the header kit coming and ordered hells gate hotrods flanges too . [​IMG]
     
  27. Quick question,

    Anyone got any tips on easily identifying the 320 VS. the 263. I have a chance to pick up a Buick inline for fairly cheap, but, am 1600 miles away and would like to make it easy on the guy that would be looking at it for me. I'm wondering how to externally identify if it's the later non babbit motor, and if it would be a 320. Thanks.
     
  28. nali
    Joined: Sep 15, 2009
    Posts: 828

    nali
    Member

    Easy.
    A 248 or 263 head is about 32 " long.
    A 320 is about 36 " long.

    A 263 will have some external vertical ribs against the cylinder wall on the intake/exhaust side, while the 248 is smooth.

    There s a lot of information here :
    http://www.teambuick.com/reference/contents.php

    But you have to register.
    There s even a chart to know the exact model year with the # number stamped on the block near the distributor, but I can t find it for now.
     
  29. Bib Overalls
    Joined: Aug 3, 2001
    Posts: 4,068

    Bib Overalls
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

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