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What sandable primer for use under rustoleum/tremclad?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by oldrelics, Mar 6, 2013.

  1. oldrelics
    Joined: Apr 7, 2008
    Posts: 1,727

    oldrelics
    Member
    from Calgary

    What did you guys use for a sandable primer under rustoleum/tremclad (oil based alkyd) ? To seal filler and block?

    Do the rustoleum/tremclad primers sand well?
     
  2. fordcragar
    Joined: Dec 28, 2005
    Posts: 3,179

    fordcragar
    Member
    from Yakima WA.

    Under Rustoleum, you should be able to use almost anything.
     
  3. Rusty O'Toole
    Joined: Sep 17, 2006
    Posts: 9,492

    Rusty O'Toole
    Member

    The only reason to use Tremclad is poverty. Therefore, if you must use primer, it would have to be the cheapest lacquer primer surfacer.

    Tremclad does not need primer to stick. In other words, you don't need to use primer. Unless you need to smooth out the surface.

    PS the other reason to use Tremclad is, it stands up well on chassis and under fenders. In that case, no primer needed either. I have used it on trailers, chassis, etc for years with no primer and had no problems.
     
  4. I'm currently experimenting with alkyd enamels from Rustoleum, Valspar, and high end Kirby Yacht paint. I've applied them via spray, brush, and dip over properly prepped lacquer and epoxy primer with no ill effects, so you shouldn't have a problem.

    Despite the negativity toward oil based enamels, I believe they do have a place - particularly in mimicking DIY 1930's & 40's finishes. Although not required, I would highly suggest a good epoxy over bare metal, then filler primer, then your alkyd enamel. The downfall of alkyd enamels is a lack of UV protection - wax early and often or deal with fading & chalking.
     

  5. Rustoleum sells a clean metal and rusty metal primer. Both the same except the color.
     
    Work In Progress likes this.
  6. Not sure on how much UV protection it has, but rustoleum has a boat line of paints with UV protection.
     
  7. scottybaccus
    Joined: Mar 13, 2006
    Posts: 4,109

    scottybaccus
    Member

    I've used valspar high build primers under valspar and rustoleum. It sands well once it cures. Temp and humidity have a lot to do with that, but you can play with your reducers to get faster flash and cure in cool weather, etc.

    If it isn't cured, ....walk away....for a long time...like a week...or two....
     
  8. oldrelics
    Joined: Apr 7, 2008
    Posts: 1,727

    oldrelics
    Member
    from Calgary


    Where do you get the Valspar high build primer? What is the product number?
     
  9. scottybaccus
    Joined: Mar 13, 2006
    Posts: 4,109

    scottybaccus
    Member

    I get it at Tractor Supply, but I've seen it in the big box stores, too.
     
  10. matthew mcglothin
    Joined: Mar 3, 2007
    Posts: 970

    matthew mcglothin
    Member

    I used this. Wet sands and blocks pretty damn good. Picked it up at a local parts house.
    ImageUploadedByTJJ1362665549.242418.jpg


    Posted from the TJJ App for iPhone & iPad
     
  11. matthew mcglothin
    Joined: Mar 3, 2007
    Posts: 970

    matthew mcglothin
    Member

    Just painted this 39 for a buddy. Used all rustoluem products.
    ImageUploadedByTJJ1362665664.422753.jpg ImageUploadedByTJJ1362665684.040704.jpg


    Posted from the TJJ App for iPhone & iPad
     
  12. Dan in Pasadena
    Joined: Sep 11, 2009
    Posts: 862

    Dan in Pasadena
    Member

    I think that looks pretty damn good. I assume you sprayed it? HVLP? If so, what tip size and did you use a hardner with it?


    Rustoleum type products may not be THE optimum products - but on the other hand for a home built car that will (in my case) likely spend its life either in a garage or under a cover when not driven and be waxed often, why NOT use it if you're happy with the results? Talk about traditional? These kind of paint jobs strike me as VERY in keeping with the old hotrodders traditions!
     
  13. matthew mcglothin
    Joined: Mar 3, 2007
    Posts: 970

    matthew mcglothin
    Member

    It was sprayed with hvlp with a 1.3 tip with no hardener. Thanks for the complements. I agree . Not everyone can afford material prices these days for high end stuff. Not even me and I work in a body shop. Traditional.. I think so!
     
  14. el Scotto
    Joined: Mar 3, 2004
    Posts: 4,357

    el Scotto
    Member
    from Tracy, CA

    Like everything in life, it has it's place.

    I used one coat on the cab of a '57 Chevy truck I never waxed, spent its entire life outdoors and was more than happy with the results. No fading, peeling, anything. I plan on using it again on similar "just a driver" vehicles.

    Its not right for your high end car and no one would suggest it.
     
  15. hemifalcon
    Joined: Mar 20, 2008
    Posts: 379

    hemifalcon
    Member

    hmmm.. those sort of results really make ya wonder... I'm assuming that lighter colored paints would other wise fare well such as "white" or something lighter that wouldnt' absorb a lot of heat through the suns direct rays.. My '65 Chevy truck may be a possiby candidate if I don't spend the money on the pricey paints... Your guys stories of using the Rust-Oleum really make me consider this as an option. I seem to use Rust-Oleum on all my other parts (small parts) and it always works fine. I used it on the entire underbody and chassis on my '62 VW and haven't had ANY problems with it over 15,000 miles..
     

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