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Vintage shots from days gone by!

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Dog427435, Dec 18, 2009.

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  1. vinfab
    Joined: Apr 18, 2006
    Posts: 106

    vinfab
    Member
    from midwest

    Someone asked about this car in an earlier post. It is the 1960 Super Monza. A styling exercise built in 1959 for Bill Mitchell (head of GMs Styling Department) and to generate press for the yet to be released Corvair coupe. This makes this Corvair the first coupe and the first non Corvette, Chevrolet to have Bucket Seats predating the Impala SS by 2 years. After use by Chevrolet Advertising it was given to Bill Mitchell who then gave it to his daughter for her 16th Birthday. The car is currently in the Corvair Museum. Ypsilanti_Automotive_Heritage_Museum_August_2013_15_(1960_Chevrolet_Corvair_Super_Monza).jpg
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2019
    dan c, solo2r, Mark Hinds and 15 others like this.
  2. George Klass
    Joined: Dec 31, 2007
    Posts: 777

    George Klass
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    427051-1000-02x_zpsnv7icezp.jpg
    In the 1930's, the then chief of the LAFD introduced "two piece" Engine Companies in the high value areas of Los Angeles, like Hollywood and Downtown L.A. These rigs were both 1937 American la France built to LAFD specs. The lead engine (shown above) is not a pumper, it is a Hose Wagon or a Manifold Wagon. The only small hose was the hose reel on the top. Other than that, the only small hose it carried was 2 1/2" hose, which could be pulled out of the bins on the side (cross laid) and attached to one of the many hose outlets. It carried a small (200 gal) tank and a tiny water pump (for car fires or trash fires). The water from the hydrants was pumped to the Hose Wagon by the pumper in the background.

    3fd1745d-c7a8-4358-a8df-934903b729ba_zpsfmvdxd9o.jpg
    Here are the same LAFD specs with the Hose Wagon built by Segrave. Note the water monitor (or cannon) on the top, it was designed for a fire boat and could (and did) poke pretty large holes in the sides of buildings, to provide for an "interior attack" without going inside the building (breathing apparatus did not exist back then).

    Ckc3NMlVAAEcq_s_zpsmirngoc6.jpg
    This is the pumper that is part of the "two piece" engine companies. American la France "Duplex Pumper" with dual V-12 engines and dual 1500 gal/minute pumps. It carried no supply hose, only the hose that could couple up to hydrants. They could park it an intersection at a big fire and pull water from two seperate hydrants, pushing an enormous amount of water to the Hose Wagon. I remember these rigs very well, they had open exhaust (no mufflers) and when they had both pumps running at full song, the street shook. You can see the open exhaust sticking up above the rear engine.

    CkiPv58VEAAyTj-_zpsasie9r2z.jpg
    The supply hose (3 1/2-inch in those days) coming from one of the pumps on the Duplex Pumper is on the other side of the rig, the 2 1/2-inch hose is going to the fire ground.

    13474943_1038012312931769_7781597461157046629_o_zpsw9hou969.jpg
    The chief's theory behind all of this was that the streets were getting choked with fire apparatus at large fires, and one of these two piece engine companies could take the place of 4 or 5 single engine companies.

    I had a lot of contacts with the LAFD while I was growing up made a lot of friends with the department. In 1973, I wrote a book about "Fire Apparatus - a Pictorial History of the Los Angeles Fire Department", a photo history about some of their unique equipment. It was published and sold over 5,000 copies (at $5.00 each).
    5132F55Nm1L._SY377_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
    It's been out of print for many years (the publisher went out of business in the 1990's) and I still see used copies for sale on Amazon, for about $100 each. https://www.amazon.com/Fire-apparatus-pictorial-history-Department/dp/B0006CLD3U
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2019
  3. CAVEMAN_1960
    Joined: Dec 10, 2010
    Posts: 34

    CAVEMAN_1960
    Member
    from Michigan

    Actually this is the third Corvair to be built with bucket seats. There were two prototype "Monza" coupes built prior to the one in the picture. They were put on the Show Circuit as a pair back in 1960. The first one started off as a "body-in-white" and was built into a prototype Monza coupe by Chevrolet Engineering. The front seat started off as a bench seat and it was cut and made into two separate front seats. Bucket seats! The passenger's side seat was non-adjustable as was the production version of the Monza that entered the market in May of 1960. The first Monza coupe never had a serial number (VIN) so it was never sold after the 1960 New Car Show circuit. The second Monza was built up from coupe body #7 and still exists today. The "Super Monza" is on display at the Chevrolet Hall of Fame Museum - Corvair wing, in Decatur, Illinois
     
    loudbang, Bleach, Deuces and 3 others like this.
  4. rudestude
    Joined: Mar 23, 2016
    Posts: 2,089

    rudestude
    Member

    Found this to be a interesting looking Corvair
    This was on the cover of Car Life August 1962... 1551638861527~2.jpeg

    Sent from my SM-T387V using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  5. Plate #1 on an early DeDion-Bouton - with a DeDion rear end.
     
    jeepsterhemi and chryslerfan55 like this.
  6. 41 C28
    Joined: Dec 17, 2005
    Posts: 1,755

    41 C28
    Member

  7. Love these old wagons!

    [​IMG]
     
  8. AND these old Lincolns!

    [​IMG]
     
  9. jeepsterhemi
    Joined: Dec 5, 2009
    Posts: 2,098

    jeepsterhemi
    Member

    1898 De Dion Bouton owned by M. Ucal H Dandurand.
    Chateau Ramezay museum.


    Imm-01.jpg Imm-02.jpg
     
  10. Sky Six
    Joined: Mar 15, 2018
    Posts: 1,140

    Sky Six
    Member
    from Arizona

    This made me both smile and cry. This is exactly the wagon I learned to drive in, same color and all. You couldn't pick up a hooker, let alone a female classmate, in this thing.
     
    dan c, Lamego, hotrodA and 14 others like this.
  11. blueprint2002
    Joined: Dec 25, 2018
    Posts: 231

    blueprint2002

    Great pics and captions too.
    This "hot rod" pumper must have consumed diesel (gasoline?) at gallons per second. Any idea how many hours it could run both pumps at full power?
     
  12. that is a rare pic! It is one of the very few Ponchos I have seen with a front/crank driven blower.
     
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