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Vintage shots from days gone by!

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Dog427435, Dec 18, 2009.

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  1. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
    Member

    [​IMG]
    August 1952, this North American AJ Savage refuels F9F Panther in evaluation tests at Naval Air Test Center in Patuxent
    River, MD. Modeled after the British "Drogue and Probe" method the Navy's in flight refueling technique is accomplished
    when the pilot flies his aircraft equipped with a refueling lance into the device fastened at the end of the hose on a
    tanker aircraft.

     
  2. Heo2
    Joined: Aug 9, 2011
    Posts: 661

    Heo2
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    The mailman in the 1890s
    He was armed with a sabre
    and revolver for his protection
     
  3. Heo2
    Joined: Aug 9, 2011
    Posts: 661

    Heo2
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    The first aeroplane that landed in my
    hometown Kalix in 1923
     
  4. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
    Member

    [​IMG]

    Capt. Ted Williams, USMC, in a Grumman F9F
    Panther. He flew 39 combat missions in Korea.
    (Photo credit: USMC via National Archives.)




    [​IMG]


    One hard-headed sumbitch, Ted steadfastly
    refused to tip his hat to fans or the press after
    he was harassed by both early in his career.
    His storied feats are too many to recount, so
    I won't. He FINALLY tipped his hat to a NEW
    generation of Red Sox fans in 1991 when the
    club honored him for his .400 season, the
    last in the majors. Like Ty Cobb, he remained,
    always, his own man.
     
  5. leon renaud
    Joined: Nov 12, 2005
    Posts: 1,935

    leon renaud
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    from N.E. Ct.

    I wonder how much of the 1890s cabins are still part of the houses there? Someone remodeling a room night find that at one time that room was an entire home it happens often where older houses still exist. It's common to find out the large kitchen room of old houses was the original dwelling that got expanded on many times and eventually got swallowed up by the current building.
     
  6. leon renaud
    Joined: Nov 12, 2005
    Posts: 1,935

    leon renaud
    Member
    from N.E. Ct.

    There's a logging "tractor" like this in the lobby of the Maine state Museum in Augusta. For those that like Museums this is a great one by the way and if i remember right it's free besides!
     
  7. Deuce Daddy Don
    Joined: Apr 27, 2008
    Posts: 5,167

    Deuce Daddy Don
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Thanks!---Finally----Justice was served--Shame, all about MONEY!
     
  8. Deuce Daddy Don
    Joined: Apr 27, 2008
    Posts: 5,167

    Deuce Daddy Don
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Guess he was over there when I was!----I've got some old 8mm of the "Panthers" dropping goodies on the "Gooks".
     
  9. No Cents
    Joined: Feb 28, 2009
    Posts: 331

    No Cents
    Member

    [​IMG]
    STANDARD gas station Lakeview Motel Haubstadt IN



    This was 3 miles from my house. Its an empty lot now.
    It was one of the best restaurants in the area.
     
  10. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
    Member

    Hey there, Deuce. Thanks for your service to your country, man. Me, I was only born in 1950, so I grew up listening to WWI, WWII and Korea stuff from my MANY relatives who also fought for their country. They hated the enemies they'd fought, and dehumanizing your enemy makes him easier to attack with extreme prejudice. My next-door neighbor growing up also was a vet, a Tennesseean shot through the hip at the "Frozen Chosin" Reservoir.

    I'm glad you put the G-word in quotes, as it shows that fighting men understood it was a demeaning term. I'd thought it only was used during the 'Nam era, but it utrns out that it was used by marines as early as the Spanish-American War, referring to Filipino enemies (there had been an atrocity against trapped marines, so I guess I can understand the angst, even though Perishing severely punished those whom he thought responsible). Enough on the history front. Still, it's a slur and doesn't need to be on the HAMB, even quoted in an historical context. S'let's move on to the positive stuff.
     
  11. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
    Member

    It never ceases to amaze me that when you go searching for one thing on the 'net, you often
    stumble across something way better than you were seeking! Following is a a sort of photo-
    graphic time machine, providing a fascinating look at Korea, immediately after the Japanese
    surrender and the invasion of Korean communists into the south which, soon, would lead the
    country back into war. THIS shows the relatively peaceful interlude between the two conflicts.
    ALL photos were shot by Don O'Brien of the signal corps, except for, I think, the very first one,
    shot by comrade Rolland Oxton. All I can say is that Don O'Brien was and is a real master of
    the craft and art of photography! If, hopefully this FlickR link works, you can see MANY more
    of Don's shots from this unique window in time: www.flickr.com/photos/dok1/95931222/.

    [​IMG]

    Sunday drive in Korea, gone bad! November 1945, photographer Rolland Oxton of the Boston
    Herald said simply: "On a Sunday afternoon in Korea during November 1945, three of us--all
    photographers-- drove down this road. We reached a point where even our trusty Jeep couldn't
    go any farther." Photo posted to the 'net by FlickR member Dok1, Don O'Brien.


    [​IMG]

    Refugees, Fusan, Korea, December 1945, also posted by Dok1.
     
  12. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
    Member

    [​IMG]

    Don in Korea with his DKO Speed Graphic of which he commented,
    "The 4x5 Speed Graphic was the workhorse for still pictures taken by
    the Signal Corps in World War II. This is one that my outfit, 198th
    Signal Photo Company, took first to Europe and then to Korea."

    [​IMG]

    Korean woman, photographed by Don, Seoul, Korea, November 1945.
     
  13. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
    Member

    [​IMG]

    You can just see Don's shadow lower-left in this November 1945 photo he calls simply, "Korean Friends."
    As he tells it: "When we stopped for lunch en route from Seoul to the east coast, in November 1945, these
    six friendly Koreans appeared. They didn't care much for our Army rations. [LOL!] I used the Speed
    Graphic to photograph them with my partner, Ulysses Quentin Davis." A Korean FlickR user commented
    that the older fella is showing respect to Quentin by receiving a gift with both hands.


    [​IMG]

    Shooting 35-mm movie footage of the Han River Railroad Bridges in October 1945. Don relates:
    "I was using this 35mm Eyemo with 400-foot magazines to film parts of a report on the Korean
    railroad. The US Army railroad experts were training Koreans to operate the system that Japanese
    had controlled since 1910." [Note: Since right after the Russo-Japanese War]. "The site pictured is
    west of Seoul above the rail bridges crossing the Han River. These were later bombed by North
    Korea." Of this photo, FlickR member McKimchee enthused, "My dad was a toddler when my
    grandfather, a wealthy importer, gathered up the family and fled south from the communists under
    the cover of night. My dad feintly [sic] recalls crossing a bridge of some importance in freezing
    temperatures. Perhaps this is the one! "


     
  14. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
    Member

    [​IMG]

    I'll bet even Ansel Adams would have nodded approvingly at Don's style, B&W accentuating
    tone, texture, composition -- what I love about B&W photography on REAL film! The is the
    Han River near Seoul, shot in November 1945 by Don, using his 4X5 Speed Graphic and
    Super X film pack.


    [​IMG]

    Delicate balancing act call "Ji- gye." Don related that he and his
    companions saw many boys and men regularly carrying firewood
    and tender into Seoul during the winter of '45.
     
  15. jimi .... wow we were borne the same year! My father-in-law was drafted and sent to Korea in 1950 (the year WE were borne) and twenty years later I too was drafted and sent to very same division pops was in. I spent 15 months there mostly on the Im-jim-gang river with our artillery pieces pointed five miles to North Korea ... interesting days
     
  16. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
    Member

    That's good! I worked with a guy who was on active during BOTH Korea and 'Nam. SO, he was one of the lucky ones who got to fight in TWO wars. Yuck. That's luck? Another guy I know was a BAR man on Okinawa and did the same damn job in Korea. Go figure. But, hell, they were were both super-patriots, so they laughed about it more than anything. What a world.
     
  17. Here is the bride at Munsan- (either Freedom or Liberty bridge, not sure)
    [​IMG]

    Between the war damage and floods the bridges dont last long ... alot of abuttments remain
    [​IMG]

    The Im-jim-gang river turns into the Han river
     
  18. jimi'shemi291
    Joined: Jan 21, 2009
    Posts: 9,499

    jimi'shemi291
    Member

    130 or a C-123? How would they get it back in the air? :eek:
    Oh, anyhow . . .

    I realized that I didn't say what a BAR (B.A.R.) was for the benefit of visitors to the thread.
    Browning fully automatic rifle, though most guys used them semi-auto where they had that
    distinctive barking noise that induced a lot of enemies to surrender rather than fight.:eek: 16-
    shot magazine could fire all in less than four seconds on full auto.

    Any wonder the Louisiana laws weren't gonna let Clyde Barrow defend himself? He's
    holding one B.A.R. and seems to have a go-to backup, as well!

    [​IMG]

    (BTW, that sawed-off pump down there also looks like a Browning to me. Help?)
     
  19. C-130 ... the biggun! Bonnie and Clyde loved their ford v-8's

    This picture is probably out of the same roll of film as the BAR shot only different car. I have always love it .... the crossed pistols!
     
  20. empire
    Joined: Apr 27, 2011
    Posts: 2,144

    empire
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  21. Joe Nix
    Joined: Jul 18, 2010
    Posts: 26

    Joe Nix
    Member

    Ozark Trading Post, Very close to the Arkansas/Missouri state line on Highway 37. I drove by it a few times every year from 1991 to 2008. I recall it looking much the same, not as neat and usually with a lot of stuff out front.
    Page 2100 item 41987
     
  22. empire
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    empire
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    empire
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    empire
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  27. empire
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    empire
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  28. empire
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    empire
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