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Hot Rods Trying to build a 1920ish Ford roadster body out of this!

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by edwardlloyd, Mar 10, 2016.

  1. hot-rod
    Joined: Jan 5, 2007
    Posts: 10

    hot-rod
    Member

    Hi Ed, it may be that you have too much time? I have to agree with Baumi; you´r crazy [​IMG]

    Dirk
     
  2. Atwater Mike
    Joined: May 31, 2002
    Posts: 7,098

    Atwater Mike
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Ed...It's unanimous. But 'crazy' is how the square world sees all of us.
    Really cool how you envisioned that trunk. All those shapes...

    I was also impressed with the template our friend with the '27 roadster made for the Pick-n-Pull van hood for the quarters!
    I'm using some shapes for a belly pan on a Track T.
    Much easier than your undertaking. Cheers!
     
  3. Ed, You are crazy....but cool. Signed up for the ride on this one.....Nothing like thinking out of the box..
     
  4. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 1,640

    edwardlloyd
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Germany

    I'm quite a bit further than the photos show and at this stage can finally say: it will work. I have cut the second Fiesta hood down the middle and it makes perfect sides.
    I've decided to look for a gas tank that'll fit under the seat to free up trunk space.
    Also decided to build it RHD for several reasons.
    A) I have a pair of RHD '32 spindles I could use.
    B.) I can get a RHD 30-31 steering box locally cheaper than a LHD from David Pontones.
    C) David will probably swap my LHD bell housing for a RHD.
    And D) biggest reason. After narrowing the frame there is no room anymore between starter and frame. On the right hand of the engine there's loads more space.
     
  5. dutchrod
    Joined: Feb 5, 2009
    Posts: 220

    dutchrod
    Member

    Come on Ed , we need pics ! :)
     
  6. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 1,640

    edwardlloyd
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Germany

    This is all I have right now. DSCN0837.JPG DSCN0838.JPG
     
  7. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 1,640

    edwardlloyd
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Germany

    Got some more pictures here with the trunk floor painted. The Fiesta hood cut in half forming the sides of the bucket. I have attached it using tiny 4mm nuts and bolts and won't weld it in place until I've done all the work needed on the side (doors, hinges, top edge beading etc.) The 4mm holes are easier to weld up in the end. Also the sides are much higher than they will end up being but that will be dealt with later. Also one side will need a door working into it.
    Amazingly the captive nuts where the hood was originally attached to the hinges ended up at the base of the A-piller so I was able to use them to attach the sides to the subframe.
    DSCN0857.JPG DSCN0858.JPG DSCN0859.JPG DSCN0860.JPG DSCN0861.JPG DSCN0862.JPG
    Yesterday I also triangulated the firewall feet a bit like the way '32s are done. Now the firewall is rigid. Now the tricky bit will be making those compound curved cowl side panels. I'll need to have a trawl through all that Ford Courier sheet metal I've got;-)
    The brown color on the trunk floor is the final color. It's actually a rust proofing semi matt paint and that's all it's getting. The firewall and cowl top will remain the way they are. I find them so beautiful as they are and don't want to cover them up with paint.
    I just noticed I still have the screen washer jets on the sides pointing forwards. Should I leave them on there? You could have fun with those:)
    Ed
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2016
  8. cfmvw
    Joined: Aug 24, 2015
    Posts: 260

    cfmvw
    Member

    I'm always impressed by the ingenuity and craftsmanship I see in some of these threads...and best of all, you built it yourself!
     
  9. Late to the Party
    Joined: Nov 16, 2015
    Posts: 715

    Late to the Party
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Edward -- You have remarkable vision and imagination to make this happen. My hat's off to you!
     
  10. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 1,640

    edwardlloyd
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Germany

    Next up the lower cowl panels. These made me think a lot first because the panel curves in both ways a most panels do, but at the bottom its convex and at the top it's half convex and half concave, so how does that happen?
    Only way to find out, grab a piece of metal. First off I want to say how impressed I am with the late 1990's Ford steel. It's so malleable you can form it into shapes with your bare hands. It's like plastic! It welds well with little distortion as long as you remove all traces of the zinc coating.
    Now I was needing a panel with flanges on three sides and as you all know getting that out right first time is impossible, so I didn't try. First I made the flange which will weld to the firewall out of a tapered double flanged piece I found where they place those dummy windows on the sides of deliveries.
    Next I cut my side cowl panel a little oversize out of the Fiesta door skin.
    Then I folded a flange at the top and bottom. The top one angles up to follow the Model-T cowl, and the bottom one angles a bit down to meet the side of the bucket. Once the flanges are bent on the convex door skin suddenly trys to go flat and gets all confused in the process. Then using my shrinker and stretcher tools from Eastwood I put curves back into the panel and after much adjustment it fitted perfectly. Amazingly that once convex panel did the complex twist I needed! As luck would have it the panel was then welded to the side panel, which used to be the Fiesta hood, and I could sandwich it between outside skin and the strengthening panel which is now my A-piller so it's already very rigid. Actually I think this car hood gives me a level of side impact protection I wouldn't have in a real Model-T.
    Here's some pictures. As you can see the door will be on the left side of the car because I'm building it RHD.
    DSCN0886.JPG DSCN0887.JPG DSCN0888.JPG
     
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  11. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 1,640

    edwardlloyd
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Germany

    The two cowl side panels took me 12 hours in all. Then yesterday I made up an inner door frame, or door jam if you like, from the top of one of those rear doors on the delivery. The part with the window in it. I cut it down, narrowed it 4" and welded it up again. Then I carefully cut out the inner bracing on the hood where the door jam was to sit and cut the A-pillar back a bit, so the door jam slide perfectly into place. Then I cut out the opening. It won't be welded in until my beading machine turns up and I can put the upper bead in the side panel. The inner door jam has a factory feel about it. Actually looks more modern than T's were but it's functional and will mostly be covered up anyway.
    Today I started on the door using the top of the other rear door from the delivery van.
    DSCN0889.JPG DSCN0890.JPG DSCN0892.JPG
    Once it's all welded up it'll be very rigid.
    More tomorrow.
    Ed
     
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  12. 35cab
    Joined: Jan 5, 2011
    Posts: 201

    35cab
    Member

    Ed,
    Amazing vision and equally great workmanship. I love how you are working with the donor panels and making the best use of what they offer to produce a very convincing body that has its own aesthetic (and structural) integrity.
    Looking forward to seeing how this progresses.
    Gordon.
     
  13. Atwater Mike
    Joined: May 31, 2002
    Posts: 7,098

    Atwater Mike
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    ^^^^@35cab's right.^^^^ Couldn't have said it better.
    I'm intrigued with the 'go ahead' approach on every panel. And how they all play into the Master Plan!
     
  14. _justakid_
    Joined: Sep 16, 2014
    Posts: 105

    _justakid_
    Member

  15. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 1,640

    edwardlloyd
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Germany

    Today I finished the door. Took two days!!! Doors are complicated and I'm glad this car has just one.
    Again I used the upper part of the other rear door from the Ford Fiesta Delivery. (Hey at least I can say my Model-T is 100% Ford!) I used cheap door hinges I had lying around and bought a simple door latch for house doors from a store for 15 bucks. Getting everything to fit is long winded and frustrating but it worked out in the end.
    The inside door handle is made from a '32 Ford brake push rod. The outside skin on the door is only there to give it the correct shape. Later I'll attach the door skin to it, but first I need my beading machine to put the beads on the skin.
    Finally today I refitted the cowl and bolted it in place.
    Next I have to make filler panels to connect the side panels to the subframe.
    I need a flat gas tank, 26" x 14" x 7", to fit under the seat. Anyone got any ideas?
    I'm also checking the local ads for a used brown or black leather sofa, preferably diamond buttoned. Folks almost give them away and it's a cheap way to get leather.
    DSCN0893.JPG DSCN0894.JPG DSCN0895.JPG DSCN0896.JPG DSCN0897.JPG DSCN0898.JPG DSCN0899.JPG DSCN0900.JPG DSCN0901.JPG DSCN0902.JPG
     
  16. ynottayblock
    Joined: Dec 23, 2005
    Posts: 1,954

    ynottayblock
    Member

    Ed you're a mad man. keep it up
     
  17. dutchrod
    Joined: Feb 5, 2009
    Posts: 220

    dutchrod
    Member

  18. bengeltiger
    Joined: Mar 3, 2012
    Posts: 470

    bengeltiger
    Member

    X2!
     
  19. I had my doubts :(,but you sir are a true craftsman. Talking about making a silk purse out of a sow's ear!! My hats off to you for excellent planning, vision, and execution!!!
     
    Late to the Party likes this.
  20. SR100
    Joined: Nov 26, 2013
    Posts: 211

    SR100

    I don't know about the EU, but here in the US, there a number of low quality products sold as 'leather.' Most aren't durable enough for an open car. That said, The Cheap, No Sew Roadster Upholstery thread shows a T roadster interior done like you are planning.
    The Leather thread has a lot of good advice about the pros & cons.
    In a sports car mag a couple of years ago, a Frenchman used the leather from a older Peugeot seat to cover his Bugatti seats. It looked great. I don't know which German cars would have usable leather. Modern seat leather wouldn't last, as described in the threads above.
     
  21. Legendlives
    Joined: Mar 4, 2016
    Posts: 213

    Legendlives

    Brilliant work. I love the way you are using all of the body parts. Truly inspirational!
     
  22. butch27
    Joined: Dec 10, 2004
    Posts: 2,556

    butch27
    Member

    THAT is looking great.
     
  23. Gearhead Graphics
    Joined: Oct 4, 2008
    Posts: 2,502

    Gearhead Graphics
    Member
    from Denver Co

    That's one bitchin looking pizza truck!
     
  24. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 1,640

    edwardlloyd
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Germany

    I've started painting it and am rolling the paint on. It's some kind of rust protecting paint. Then I'm sanding it down with scuff pads. I'm looking for a faded paint look which will match the sun baked rust original cowl.
     
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  25. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 1,640

    edwardlloyd
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Germany

    Here's a picture
     

    Attached Files:

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  26. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 21,429

    The37Kid
    Member

    Looks great, door on the wrong side and all. Bob
     
  27. studebakerjoe
    Joined: Jul 7, 2015
    Posts: 94

    studebakerjoe

    images-10.jpeg Ed first I want to say amazing work. Second about the fan/water pump problem. Perhaps you could adapt a Mercedes 190sl water pump and fan? It would take a bit of fabricating but I think it could work. Good luck can't wait to see it finished.
     
  28. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 1,640

    edwardlloyd
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Germany

    I made up the seat now. I had an old 1970s MK2 Escort rear seat which was still wire framed like in the old days. I think many 70's compact cars still used sprung rear seats. The seat was too wide so I stripped the upholstery off and narrowed the frame. I also made up a seat base out of two old electric storage heaters which were made of a nice heavy gauge steel. I temporarily replaced the upholstery so I can test sit in the car - important for steering wheel and pedal placement.

    DSCN0903.JPG DSCN0904.JPG DSCN0905.JPG DSCN0906.JPG IMG_20160613_155610.jpg
    So even the seat is Ford! But the seat base is from AEG.
     
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  29. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 1,640

    edwardlloyd
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Germany

    Here's some more parts going into the project.
    IMG_20160613_155727.jpg IMG_20160613_155836.jpg
    I think I'll use an electric fuel pump just in case I want to fit a down draft carburetor later on. Also a nice original horn I found on ebay.
     
  30. studebakerjoe
    Joined: Jul 7, 2015
    Posts: 94

    studebakerjoe

    Keep up the great work ed. Hope my suggestion of 190sl water pump helped in some way even if to just give you ideas.
     

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