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Hot Rods Trying to build a 1920ish Ford roadster body out of this!

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by edwardlloyd, Mar 10, 2016.

  1. I missed that at first. It's a great project for sure
     
  2. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 2,067

    edwardlloyd
    Member
    from Germany

    I'm not promising this will work. I might end up retitling the thread "How to wreck a Ford Courier in 3 hours."
    It's a suck and see idea.
     
  3. evintho
    Joined: May 28, 2007
    Posts: 1,663

    evintho
    Member

    Very creative build! This may help a little. I built the bun panels on my '27 roadster using a Chevy van hood, a Howell's lower bun patch panel and sheet metal from an old washing machine. Here's a short rundown.

    Original, rotted panels beyond repair................

    [​IMG]


    Curvature template.................

    [​IMG]


    Early '80s to mid '90s Chevy van hood. They're all the same and a dime a dozen at Pick-N-Pull..........

    [​IMG]


    Perfect match!

    [​IMG]


    Remove hoods inner structure.................

    [​IMG]


    Cut panel slightly larger...........................

    [​IMG]


    Mocked up with Howell's patch panel......................

    [​IMG]


    Gotta luv washing machine sheet metal. They're all over the 'free' section of Craigslist!

    [​IMG]


    It contributed the door jambs........................

    [​IMG]


    And top sections, also.........................

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Still needs a little finish work but they fit really well!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    rwrj, tkoon, Dannerr and 14 others like this.
  4. Definitely worth a try at that price...
     
  5. BTW - you're most of the way there to making an Autotesting car out of the Fiesta...
     
  6. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 2,067

    edwardlloyd
    Member
    from Germany

    That was expensive for a 19 year old car with a siezed engine. But it was local and exactly what I was looking for so I didn't haggle. But honestly it should have been 50 bucks max.
    Dent and rust free is also pretty much a given over here.
     
  7. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 2,067

    edwardlloyd
    Member
    from Germany

    If anyone will send me an original Model-T roadster body to my shop in Germany for 200 bucks including shipping and taxes I'll throw all that Fiesta Courier steel in the trash and use your T body.
     
  8. This is true HOT RODDING! my new favorite thread. Good luck and if I can do any thing to help, please let me know. I do have lots of T and A parts. I'll Be a watching. Thanks Ron...
     
    kiwijeff likes this.
  9. Limey Kid
    Joined: Mar 5, 2006
    Posts: 1,023

    Limey Kid
    Member

    I think something that is forgotten in our traditional hot rod arena, is that "back in the day" there were a lot of jalopy hot rods built. Not everybody could afford an old '32 roadster, so they made what they could, with what they had, or with what they could find. I think we sometimes have a slightly skewed hindsight. In the present, trying to replicate the past, I think we overdo it sometimes. The perfect bracket, the perfect tig welds, the super rare parts etc. etc. There were a lot of home built bodies on hot rods. They rarely made Hot Rod magazine, but that was based out west. If you look in the other small books you will find more of them.
    I'm a Brit, living in the US. But I remember more than 1 T Bucket body made out of an old Ford 100E roof panel, because we couldn't find a genuine T body panels.
    Wish you every success with this. Your building a Hot Rod, or Speedster, or whatever you are going to call it. You are not restoring an original car, so the only rules you have to play by, are the ones you set for yourself.
    By the way I'm still working on my T body, so if you need any measurements, drop me a pm, or convo as the cool kids say now.
    Cheers,
    Stewart.
     
  10. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 2,067

    edwardlloyd
    Member
    from Germany

    This is the brass era radiator which is what I'm building the car around. It's mint. I bought it on eBay here in Germany for 150 bucks last year including postage! . I think it would have cost ten times that in the States. Sometimes you just get lucky.
    The end result should look like the second picture except with a brass radiator, Model-A axles, hydraulic brakes and '32 18" wheels with whitewall tires. (All of which I already have).
    This project is basically got to use mostly my left over parts I've collected over the years.
    I still need a Model-A rear axle and a 30-31 steering box and column.
     

    Attached Files:

  11. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 2,067

    edwardlloyd
    Member
    from Germany

    This jalopy build was also inspiring. It looks great. But he was hardly a master body craftsman! If mine turns out this good, hell I'd be happy.
    Ed tumblr_m7j1q2dfmC1rsvj7lo1_500.jpg
     
  12. Raiman1959
    Joined: May 2, 2014
    Posts: 1,427

    Raiman1959

    I'm really appreciating the 'ambition' to at least 'try' to formulate a body from what is available. It's pretty cool to me, and I myself can testify....that I sometimes take for granted things being so 'readily available' when in other parts of the world, its' a bit more of an issue, and tighter funds available, or whatever. I'm just diggin' the whole aspect of this focus, whether it turns out okay or not....the ''vision'' is worth it to me in respect for what ''maybe'' can turn out....go for it! It's inspiring at the very least!;):D-- Ray
     
  13. Beanscoot
    Joined: May 14, 2008
    Posts: 1,860

    Beanscoot
    Member

    In fifty years old car types will be lamenting that someone cut up a perfect, rust-free Fiesta Sedan Delivery body...
     
    Mikel50 and Peanut 1959 like this.
  14. 40two
    Joined: Feb 19, 2012
    Posts: 1,867

    40two
    Member

    cool idea, Ed, good luck on that! i always thought while strolling the junkyard what a waste of nice shaped body panels that is....think your skills will make it a cool jalopy.

    Carsten
     
  15. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 2,067

    edwardlloyd
    Member
    from Germany

    I think '97 F-150's are a good source of compound curved metal.
     
  16. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 2,067

    edwardlloyd
    Member
    from Germany

    +

    That's a brilliant Tech in it's own right. I bet a few guys here could use that info!
    Ed
     
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  17. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 2,067

    edwardlloyd
    Member
    from Germany

    So I made a start and forgot to take photos until I got this far.
    I've made up the Model-A frame and I narrowed it quite a bit to make it more T like. This entails narrowing the engine mounts and the two brake cross bars too. I also lowered the engine 1 1/2" at the front and 1/2" at the rear.

    I started by welding up a full length subframe out of some industrial shelving profile I found lying around. Then I used the roof panel from the Courier to make the trunk floor.
    The rear of the bucket is made of the hood (narrowed) with the fenders welded on. I worked out that the hood, split down the middle would also make perfect bucket sides so I bought an additional hood from a junkyard.
    The trunk isn't 100% authentic. It's higher at the front than a typical 15ish roadster but as I want to put the gas tank in there I figured it wouldn't hurt to have a little more space.
    Although it's not 100% authentic I've tried to build in typical Model-T styling cues like the skirt around the subframe below the trunk and the little triangular filler pieces between the lower bucket and the trunk.
    DSCN0823.JPG DSCN0824.JPG DSCN0825.JPG DSCN0826.JPG DSCN0827.JPG DSCN0828.JPG
    Today I made the frame for the trunk lid together with a latch made out of a '32 light switch I had in one of my boxes of junk.
    I've ordered a beading machine so I'll wait til that arrives before making the skin.
    Unfortunately the Model-T firewall I bought in Canada is too wide for the cowl top I have. The firewall is a '19-'23, my cowl must be earlier so I'll have to chop it down to fit.
     
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  18. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 2,067

    edwardlloyd
    Member
    from Germany

    Is some pictures of how it looks today. Obviously this project will need some filler;-)
    DSCN0830.JPG DSCN0832.JPG DSCN0833.JPG DSCN0834.JPG
     
    rwrj, Dannerr, BradinNC and 8 others like this.
  19. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 2,067

    edwardlloyd
    Member
    from Germany

    I don't think anyone has ever fitted a Model-A engine behind a 1915 brass radiator. Nothing wants to fit! No space for a fan. The water pump wants to share space with the upper radiator outlet.
    Unless anyone can show me some amazing tricks, I think I might have to use an electric water pump and an electric fan. I'm not to bothered about the electric pump, but I would like a mechanical fan.
    Even the lower radiator outlet interferes with the generator bracket, but that can be cut back a bit. DSCN0811.JPG DSCN0815.JPG DSCN0818.JPG
     
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  20. dutchrod
    Joined: Feb 5, 2009
    Posts: 359

    dutchrod
    Member

    Nice creativity Ed !
    I like it.
     
  21. Raiman1959
    Joined: May 2, 2014
    Posts: 1,427

    Raiman1959

    Very interesting & creative....really inspiring to the ingenuity behind your 'vision' and build....I'm fascinated by the whole thing, to be honest....it's not something I would have thought at all to do, but ..sure does make a person think otherwise....it's very, very interesting....can't wait to see the end result!;):D:D;)
     
    bavarian_Tom likes this.
  22. " ...a latch made out of a '32 light switch I had in one of my boxes of junk."

    Now that's some ingenuity for sure!!!

    "Unfortunately the Model-T firewall I bought in Canada is too wide for the cowl top I have. The firewall is a '19-'23, my cowl must be earlier so I'll have to chop it down to fit."

    Model T firewalls from their beginning through the early part of the '23 model year were made of wood. Ford switched to steel in about April of 1923. That firewall was the same size as the '15-'23 wood ones and had three vertical ribs stamped into it. In June of 1923, Ford began producing the '24 model cars, which had wider and taller firewalls. Those have five vertical ribs. You might have a '23 or earlier cowl top and a '24-5 firewall. If you were here in the States it would be easy to find a steel '23 firewall. Even though they were used for only 3 or 4 months, there are plenty of them still around. It's probably not so easy to find one in Germany.
     
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  23. Limey Kid
    Joined: Mar 5, 2006
    Posts: 1,023

    Limey Kid
    Member

    This is just so cool!!
    To think the only T bits are the firewall and cowl top. All the hard shapes are your vision looking at shapes not parts. You see tub sides not a new hood. Brilliant!
    Cheers,
    Stewart.
     
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  24. Amy
    Joined: Oct 10, 2010
    Posts: 81

    Amy
    Member

    We fitted a brass radiator behind a 51' Nash straight 6. Not really the same as model a but it was a challenge.

    ImageUploadedByH.A.M.B.1461902776.909893.jpg
    ImageUploadedByH.A.M.B.1461902792.848218.jpg
     

    Attached Files:

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  25. 40two
    Joined: Feb 19, 2012
    Posts: 1,867

    40two
    Member

    what would Mc Gyver do?
     
  26. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 2,067

    edwardlloyd
    Member
    from Germany

    Indeed, I have a 5 rib firewall which is nearly 4" wider. So today I narrowed and shortened it and it now fits my cowl.
    Thanks for the information. I learn something new every day in this hobby.
     
    Dannerr likes this.
  27. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 2,067

    edwardlloyd
    Member
    from Germany

    I didn't really want to alter the '15 brass radiator, but now I've seen how good yours looks, I think I'll go that route. That will at least allow me to run the stock water pump. Just leaves the fan to be solved.
    Ed
     
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  28. Amy
    Joined: Oct 10, 2010
    Posts: 81

    Amy
    Member

    Forgot to mention that we were not able to make the mechanical fan work... So it looks like we are going the electric fan route. Still trying to find a way to hide it or make it not nearly as noticeable, since there is no hood on the car.

    Also we didn't want to alter the outlets on the radiator but decided it was better to have the outlets relocated then to have a pretty ugly radiator hose wrapping all over the place.
     
  29. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 2,067

    edwardlloyd
    Member
    from Germany

    Yes I feel a bit guilty about modifying a 101 year old radiator, but it's probably the best way to solve the problem. I do have a brass shroud which may fit. That would hide the fact that the fan is electric. I'll measure it and check. However I haven't a clue what car it's off.
    Ed
     
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  30. Baumi
    Joined: Jan 28, 2003
    Posts: 2,692

    Baumi
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Ed, you´re crazy! That´s the best compliment I have, hahaha! Awesome build!
     
    Runnin shine likes this.

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