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Thoughts about WyoTech?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Special Ed GT, Nov 11, 2004.

  1. Special Ed GT
    Joined: Jun 21, 2004
    Posts: 287

    Special Ed GT
    Member
    from Denver-ish

    I'm looking to get schooled and WyoTech is on the top of my list. Any grads here, or does anyone have opinions on the school and its fabrication/hot rodding programs?
     
  2. BigDdy31
    Joined: Jul 31, 2002
    Posts: 1,003

    BigDdy31
    Member

    A good buddy of mine went many years ago. He made a good career with his education. Worked for Ford for over ten years until he had a stroke a while back.

    Oh, and the stroke was from 3 packs of Winstons a day, not WyoTech. [​IMG]

     
  3. Winfab
    Joined: Dec 10, 2002
    Posts: 260

    Winfab
    Member

    One of my nephews went to WyoTech, is doing well enough, and thought enough of the school to have his son there now. Repeat business speaks a lot for any place. FWIW, they were/are in diesel and regular mechanics programs.

    Good luck in your education!
     
  4. Personally I think if you just saved your 30gs and swepted floors at a real rod shop and helped when you could, in no time you'd know more than what wyotech could teach you.
     
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  5. Levi Green, fabricator at Rad Rides by Troy went there. Built the green 32 roadster that won Street Rod of the Year. Not bad for someone straight outta there.

    I've heard, but do not know, that it's ran pretty straight laced. No piercings or long hair. You gotta where a suit, tie, or something to business class. Things of that nature, but that's only rumor I've heard from someone that was seriously thinking of going.

    The great thing about that school is the Hot Rod and Custom course they offer. I don't know I'd go way out in the middle of nowhere for just a regular trade school. There are plenty of those all over the country.

    There is an really nice school here in Oklahoma. OSU-Okmulgee. I graduated from there with a degree in Auto Body Technology. They have an amazing collision program, no hot rod stuff, though.

    Reverend Jake
     
  6. DollaBill
    Joined: Dec 23, 2003
    Posts: 372

    DollaBill
    Member

    I am the Lead Chassis Fabrication and High Performance Engine Instructor ( and will be leading the Street Rod and Custom Paint program soon) at WyoTech in West Sacramento.

    I can tell you that WyoTech offers an outstanding opportunity. State of the art equipment, skilled instructors, and the ability to learn the fundamentals of chassis fabrication and custom bodywork in an environment that is disciplined and rewards excellence.

    Yeah. You have to cut your hair and shave and take out your piercings. Hardly a sacrifice for access to the best fabrication and bodywork facilities imaginable.

    If you'd like more info, PM me offline and I'll be glad to answer any questions.

     
  7. Im signed up for Jan-Sept 2005 in Business management and Body/collision refinishing. The housing situtation for PA is a bitch but I found a place none the less. Not cheap by any means but I seem to hear nothing but good about the place. Were it not for the costs I'd be in HotRod, chassis, performance engine, and so on! I have to learn how to tie a tie before I leave too, that kinda sucks.

    Greg
     
  8. Tim
    Joined: Mar 2, 2001
    Posts: 7,262

    Tim
    Member
    from Raytown Mo

    hmm no opinion on this myself, though i did have some freinds atend and looked at the information myself. but this topic does come up frequently try a search and see what you can come up with.
     
  9. DrDano
    Joined: Jul 10, 2003
    Posts: 696

    DrDano
    Alliance Vendor

    GT, there are a few instructors on the board here. Beings your in Denver I imagine you'll end up in Laramie. Fire a PM to Brickster. He is an instructor out here at the street rod school and a helluva nice guy. I'm sure he can answer any questions about the school you might have.

    Now, for my opinion: I have a lot of friends who attended in the past, are currently attending, or are instructors at the school. I have a lot of respect for the school and think its the number one place to go to learn the things they teach. I also have a lot of respect for the students, actually moreso than the majority of the jackasses I go to school with at the university here. Several of my friends who went to WyoTech have ended up in pretty damn good jobs right out of school, a few have had multiple appearances on some of the hot rod shows, and a few work either full time on a show, or in one of the big name rod shops.

    But. . .one or two have ended up doing essentially nothing with their time there. Its all in how far you want to take it, as it is with getting an education at any school. There are guys that end up at dream jobs and losers who end up cooking your fries at lunch. Which one you'll be depends on you and how far you want your education to take you.
     
  10. The Harpoon
    Joined: Mar 20, 2004
    Posts: 528

    The Harpoon
    Member

    I have two friends that went there for diesel school.
    Diesel school is a great place to go if you like $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ in your wallet
     
  11. Django
    Joined: Nov 15, 2002
    Posts: 10,192

    Django
    Member

    [ QUOTE ]

    Yeah. You have to cut your hair and shave and take out your piercings. Hardly a sacrifice for access to the best fabrication and bodywork facilities imaginable.


    [/ QUOTE ]

    Can I ask why? Is it to breed young republicans or to teach mechanical skills? I'm not asking because I want to go, I just want to hear the benefit to the school by eliminating individuality within the student body.
     
  12. 12packo94s
    Joined: Aug 1, 2003
    Posts: 197

    12packo94s
    Member

    I was all signed up to go out there about 6 years ago. Then Summit Racing Equipment offered me a job so i never ended up making it. I've had a extremely good string of jobs afterwards but i always kinda regret not going.
     
  13. Landmule
    Joined: Apr 14, 2003
    Posts: 452

    Landmule
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Django - The school is designed and run to teach the students not only the trades, but general work ethics. Classes operate much like ordinary workdays do, with brief breaks for lunch, smokes. Students are expected to be on time, dressed appropriately and behave as professionals. It's all kind of a boot camp. This way graduates will have not only the skills but the work ethic. It is surprising how many people lack that even if their skills are really good. That is one element that I think sets WyoTech apart. Graduates really do understand what employers expect. The piercings/long hair things are partially safety issues as well.
    Many Wyotech grads won't go on to work in the tolorent and artsy areas of the trades. If a guy is going to have a real chance at a good job as say a BMW service tech, or working in the service dept of a Ford dealer, they're probably more likely to hire a clean cut looking person than a pierced and tattooed individual with equal or superior skills. Public impressions are important when these people have contact with the consumers and I think that's what Wyotech is trying to reinforce with their dress code.

    Sorry to sound preachy, I just happen to know alot of the staff and administration at the school.
     
  14. We just hired a Wyotech grad, not because of his schooling but because of his skill and the fact we knew him through his dad who does the interiors on most of our cars. There are huge gaps in his education from a sheetmetal fab standpoint. We had to re-learn him to work to a higher standard and he is doing fine. Remember, the school is for profit and the recruiters job is to get swinging meat through the door.
     
  15. No matter what we say or question about their ethics is not gonna change their minds on how to run their school. I know for a fact, by being that way, it turns away business. It looks like they're not hurting in the student body factor.

    I'm fence riding on this issue. I understand as an adult and a business owner, how you portray yourself projects "who" you are. BUT I also was the guy with piercings, funky hair, and tattoos in college. My school taught all of the same stuff Wyo does: Ethics, Business, Information Technology, etc and the trade. And I am proud that I went to a school with such credentials. At that time in my life I don't know that I would have sacrificed my personal lifestyle for an education I'M PAYING FOR. Luckily I didn't have to make that choice.

    Like I said, I can look at it both ways, but I don't think ethics or morality breeds from a haircut and removal of jewelry. Individuality makes this world go round (Columbus, Einstein, Hankcash).

    Reverend Jake
     
  16. Django
    Joined: Nov 15, 2002
    Posts: 10,192

    Django
    Member

    That makes sense Landmule. I was only thinking of the school in terms of ending up at a hot rod/street rod shop, which is the only way I would have wanted to go to a school like that.
     
  17. zman
    Joined: Apr 2, 2001
    Posts: 16,510

    zman
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Garner, NC

    [ QUOTE ]
    The school is designed and run to teach the students not only the trades, but general work ethics. Classes operate much like ordinary workdays do, with brief breaks for lunch, smokes. Students are expected to be on time, dressed appropriately and behave as professionals. It's all kind of a boot camp. This way graduates will have not only the skills but the work ethic. It is surprising how many people lack that even if their skills are really good. That is one element that I think sets WyoTech apart. Graduates really do understand what employers expect. The piercings/long hair things are partially safety issues as well.
    Many Wyotech grads won't go on to work in the tolorent and artsy areas of the trades. If a guy is going to have a real chance at a good job as say a BMW service tech, or working in the service dept of a Ford dealer, they're probably more likely to hire a clean cut looking person than a pierced and tattooed individual with equal or superior skills. Public impressions are important when these people have contact with the consumers and I think that's what Wyotech is trying to reinforce with their dress code.

    Sorry to sound preachy, I just happen to know alot of the staff and administration at the school.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    I gotta call bullshit on all of that. It's like they're saying that because I have tattoo's and piercings (I cut my hair off a couple years ago) that I don't have a good work ethic or that I'm not safe. BS. Even when I had long hair it was not a safety issue. You wear a hat just like you were safety glasses for your eyes. Hell they'll let 'em take a smoke break but bust balls over BS like that. That just sucks. Hell the worst offenders morality/law wise I know look as clean cut as they can be. BS stereotyping and they're just perpetuating it instead of doin something about it.
     
  18. Slide
    Joined: May 11, 2004
    Posts: 3,026

    Slide
    Member

    zman, they are prolly just trying to keep the lawyers and insurance company happy on the safety issues. If no one has hair long enough to get caught in machinery, then it seriously reduces the likelihood of a lawsuit or insurance claims for such. If you don't have long hair to begin with, then they don't have to police whether or not you have it tied back or whatever.

    I know they have females in the programs there, so you'd hafta expect they would allow SOME length of hair, just not down to yer belt.

    If they don't hafta spend money on insurance and lawyers-on-retainer, that frees up (theoretically!) $$$ for better equipment, etc.
     
  19. Landmule
    Joined: Apr 14, 2003
    Posts: 452

    Landmule
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    zman - I couldn't agree more about some really bad clean cut guys. For example, the Laramie Police seem to favor shaved heads and a storm trooper stance - jack booted thugs.

    With regard to the dress code at the Laramie campus, I know that school officials also are VERY concerned about the impression that their students make on the locals. The Wyotech students are scapegoats for all kinds of crap that happens in Laramie and have been since the school was founded in 1966. Any tagging, street racing, loud cars or speeding are blamed on "techers". That has quite a bit to do with the dress code at this campus as well.

    The reality is that people that are not into tatoos and piercings are freaked out by them. I know of places where people are required to wear long sleeves to cover tatoos. No business owner wants to scare customers. The Wyotech students in the Service Advisor program wear white shirts and ties too. Their school, their rules.

     
  20. Spitfire1776
    Joined: Jan 7, 2004
    Posts: 1,069

    Spitfire1776
    Member
    from York, PA

    No offense, Ladmule (this isn't directed at you just a comment in general) but the whole concept of work ethic and relation of appearance is bullshit, and an outdated concept. It does sound like a breeding of young republicans. In many fields, including auto mechanics, body shop, comp.sci., all the way to day trading, some of the most "ethical" people have a sleeve of ornamnet or a septum ring. Been through all the fields too. Some of the most shady were really "straightlaced" in terms of appearance.

    I worked for an electronics firm for a number of years that dealt with the likes of United Defense, Boeing, Lockheed, Harley, GMC, and I had a septum ring and my nostrils pierced 3 times. Never had a problem, and why you ask. Because I conveyed myself with a confident attitude and put forth a respectable of air of not just knowing what I was talking about but also a willing to learn and exhibit inquisitive. If they really want to help out their graduate allow them grow a sense of confidence (if they don't already have it) by being and individual and focusing on developing an inquisitive mind instead focusing on your appearance. Also did body work on the side for a Jeep joint and nobody gave a crap what I looked like, cause I did good work.

    A suit doesn't mean shit if you're dumbass screwing people over. Allow people to be who they are and base your opinion on that.
     
  21. Brickster
    Joined: Nov 23, 2003
    Posts: 1,127

    Brickster
    Member

    Because this discussion has centered on the appearance code here is the deal.

    To attend WyoTech you must have your haircut so that it does not come past your eyebrows, the middle of the ears or over your collar. Facial hair must be trimmed neatly, only a mustache and side burns are permitted. Mustache can only come to the corners of the mouth and sideburns cannot be lower than the bottom of the ear.
    No visible piercings.
    To my knowledge there is not a policy on tattoos. Unless they are sexually or racially offensive. In the almost three years I've been here their have been no issues with tattoos.

    All of the standards we put in place as well as the curriculum we teach are found to be important by the professionals from the industry that advise us.
    Once a year we hold an advisory board comprised of shop owners in the fields we teach. These owners give up three days of their busy lives to come to Laramie, WY to tell us what is important to them. The appearance of the students is always an issue. As long as it is it will stay the way it is.

    To all shop owners/managers that are thinking of hiring a Wyotech graduate, Please ask to speak with at least one of their former teachers, just as you would check anyone else's references. Also ask to see pictures or examples of the projects they worked on while they were here.
     
  22. Django
    Joined: Nov 15, 2002
    Posts: 10,192

    Django
    Member

    I agree Ol Skratch, but consider the Muffies' going in with the high end euro sedan that their husbands bought them and they need to have it worked on. They are not going to be receptive to people creative with their appearance. Those kinds of attitudes are the more prevalent attitudes you would expect from that clientel. It all goes back to the tattoo thread. My long hair has been gone for years. Hell, it all fell out! But I do have a goatee and two piercings in my ear and I would not appreciate that directive from the school to remove both. It's not the military. It's a school. But I am also in my mid 30s too and not an impressionable teenager just out of high school.
     
  23. Does the dress code apply to instructors as well? I'd fail on two of the rules [​IMG]
     
  24. Spitfire1776
    Joined: Jan 7, 2004
    Posts: 1,069

    Spitfire1776
    Member
    from York, PA

    Ahhh, muffies,....they just get uptight because they wet their panties and stick to the seat everytime they cross the proverbial "wrong side of the tracks". [​IMG]

    Wars have started over sexual tension.
     
  25. Landmule
    Joined: Apr 14, 2003
    Posts: 452

    Landmule
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Thank you Brickster. As much as we'd like to think otherwise, people do make snap judgements on appearance. First impressions matter whether it is a "Muffy" or a guy looking to have some work done. I would grant that if you have your own shop, you can look however you want to - and, work does speak for itself. A crapped out shop run by a grungy looking charactor is not going to attract the majority of people. A clean shop run by the same grungy guy would not face that snap judgement.

    I am a business owner and I decide who I hire based upon the job I'm trying to fill. The lady with no teeth and bad grammer does not greet customers, she runs a machine and does a great job. The well groomed and well spoken college boy does greet customers. I do this because it is important to my customers to be comfortable. They don't have to do business with me, they can go elsewhere. I'm not a large defense contractor, I'm a small business person. I have to strongly consider things like the appearance of my business and employees from the perspective of my customers. Frankly I'm not a big enough operator to try to make a statement with pierced septums. I'll choose the attractive co-ed everytime as a primary customer contact.

    It really is bullshit at the root, but the reality is that most folks are shallow. Since there are more shallow people out there than not, I'll go with the numbers and play along. I need the money and so does a kid that has spent $30,000 on WyoTech and has to pay it back.
     
  26. DollaBill
    Joined: Dec 23, 2003
    Posts: 372

    DollaBill
    Member

    Wacky hair, earrings, jewelry...these are all relatively new cultural expressions...trendy appearance appliances intended to seperate one from the norm...

    ...although, the frequency of black t-shirts, ink, piercings, cuffed jeans, and strap boots these days rivals the occurences of black primer and red wheels, which leads one to ask...how does one remain outside the norm, when one IS the norm...

    But thats another argument.

    Relative to WyoTech, we teach welding, metalshaping, and painting discipline. My experience in this and other training venues is that your average 20yo comes from a generation of entitlement, has no basic knowledge of things practical, and is as style concious as your average "rockabilly" type, which is about the MOST codified style on the planet. In short, he/she hasn't ever had the opportunity to apply him or herself in a dynamic environment that requires significant skill.

    So...we require them to have decent looking hair...which allows for a LOT of latitude. We require them to remove body jewelry, which is arguably a safety issue, but more importantly is representative of their willingness to dedicate themselves to learning a skill at the expense of being stylish...you know, personal and professional discipline.

    So, yeah. We require students to actually show up at work. And not do drugs. And spend a few months focusing on learning a skill as opposed to buying the latest Hot Topic shirt...

    ...and most of us, students and staff, are inked...well, here in Central California, anyway [​IMG]

    Interestingly, I have never heard a student complain that he doesnt get to wear his earrings often enough...and the only complaints I hear about the apparel is that they want DIFFERENT shirts for Chassis Fab.

    And think about it....WHO has long hair, anymore? Name me ONE hot rod or custom icon or current practioner that has huge hair.

    Exactly.

    Our people LOVE the opportunity. They LEARN from it...they CREATE. They have the opportunity to be INTERNALLY validated.

    Finally...not every graduate is a superstar. The law of averages says that not everyone is gonna have the aptitude...just because you do through the process, doesnt mean you're gonna be successful, no matter how hard you try.

     
  27. Special Ed GT
    Joined: Jun 21, 2004
    Posts: 287

    Special Ed GT
    Member
    from Denver-ish

    Thanks for the thoughts, everyone. Here are mine:

    1. Dress code: I work in a professional job right now and am used to dressing business casual. Even a tie is ok with me. As long as I don't have to wear a suit everyday, I'm fine. As far as hair etc. goes, I'm fine w/ that.

    2. I already know how to do some stuff but I would like to learn to do more, and to do things the right way. I have no delusions that at my age and experience level, that I have any chance of becoming an expert. I would like to develop core skills to build on and gain enough knowledge to buy into a shop and make a little $ doing what I love.

    3. I am really interested in the street rod/fabrication and chassis/high performance programs but my understanding is that to be guaranteed a spot in these, I need to enroll in one of the core programs. This adds 6 months of additional cost (especially, needing to maintain my house in Denver plus an apt in Laramie for a year versus six months) to the equation. So, I'm still debating enrolling in a core program. We're talking 6 months worth of additional $$$$$ for training that I could get locally (Denver Auto and Diesel College, for one). This is a tough decision.

    (Can any of you insiders vouch for this? Basically, for $7k cash, I would think that I could register and attend one of these specialty programs without needing to take a core program)

    Again, thanks for your input!
     
  28. Special Ed GT
    Joined: Jun 21, 2004
    Posts: 287

    Special Ed GT
    Member
    from Denver-ish

    [ QUOTE ]
    Personally I think if you just saved your 30gs and swepted floors at a real rod shop and helped when you could, in no time you'd know more than what wyotech could teach you.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    $30k would also buy a lot of tools.

    Any shops in Denver need a floor sweeper with his own metalworking equipment? [​IMG]
     
  29. Funny, our Wyotech Grad was just talking about HOT TOPIC this afternoon [​IMG]
     
  30. buffaloracer
    Joined: Aug 22, 2004
    Posts: 565

    buffaloracer
    Member
    from kansas

    I only know one student who attended Wyotech. He was a pretty good hand before he started. Was not overly impressed, especially for the money spent.
     

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