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Stripping chrome

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Irishman, Sep 13, 2012.

  1. Irishman
    Joined: Mar 28, 2012
    Posts: 148

    Irishman
    Member

    I need to start getting my chrome grill and bumpers ready for plating.

    Right now I've got loads of flaky rusty chrome I need to remove. The flaky stuff is easy...I just peel it off. What about the other stuff that is still attached?

    Any tips for removal from you wise people? :)
     
  2. BISHOP
    Joined: Jul 16, 2006
    Posts: 2,571

    BISHOP
    Member

    Let the chrome shop handle that. They can reverse the electrodes and it will release the old chrome. Something like that.
     
  3. 40StudeDude
    Joined: Sep 19, 2002
    Posts: 9,456

    40StudeDude
    Member

    I don't understand why people think they need to remove old peeling chrome...IF you're going to have it rechromed, let the chromer take care of it -he certainly knows more about it than you do...and you are NOT going to save enuff money to warrant you doing it yourself.

    R-
     
  4. 19Fordy
    Joined: May 17, 2003
    Posts: 7,199

    19Fordy
    Member

    Bishop is 100% correct. Don't mess with the old chrome at all.
     

  5. Mr48chev
    Joined: Dec 28, 2007
    Posts: 29,183

    Mr48chev
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    That also saves them a lot of work from having to smooth out any scratches you might put in the bumper taking the old chrome off. One of my friends who's family used to have the chrome shop here in town hated to see bumpers or other parts come in that guys had tried to slick out themselves as it usually meant half again as much work for him than if they had left it alone.

    The exception would be when you do a lot of custom modifications on a bumper and do get it to a polished state before taking it in.
     
  6. Irishman
    Joined: Mar 28, 2012
    Posts: 148

    Irishman
    Member

    I am so glad I asked before spending some quality time cursing the sandblaster or grinder.

    Thank you gentlemen!
     
  7. wallyringo
    Joined: May 19, 2010
    Posts: 709

    wallyringo
    Member

    yeah man let the pros prep it and make it look like new.
     
  8. mr crocket
    Joined: Feb 9, 2009
    Posts: 70

    mr crocket
    Member

    I used to do a lot of marine parts take them to plater and have them stripped.Pick them up and do all the polishing/prep myself because thats where a lot of the expense is.then take them back and let them do thier thing
     
  9. Hotrodhog
    Joined: Aug 11, 2011
    Posts: 169

    Hotrodhog
    Member

    Or skip the chrome and paint it!! :)
     
  10. Dreddybear
    Joined: Mar 31, 2007
    Posts: 6,019

    Dreddybear
    Member

    Haha
     
  11. williebill
    Joined: Mar 1, 2004
    Posts: 2,763

    williebill
    Member

    Uh oh



    never
     
  12. CutawayAl
    Joined: Aug 3, 2009
    Posts: 2,144

    CutawayAl
    Member
    from MI

    Not a comment on you skills, but in most cases do-it-yourself chrome removal could potentially end up making the job harder and more expensive than if you just let a pro do it.
     
  13. Irishman
    Joined: Mar 28, 2012
    Posts: 148

    Irishman
    Member

    I agree. Don't worry, I always question my own skills. lol

    I had never needed anything but clean new metal chromed in the past, so I was totally ignorant of the steps needed (or not needed as is the case).

    I do believe you guys saved my bacon this time.
     
  14. Carnuba
    Joined: Mar 19, 2012
    Posts: 430

    Carnuba
    BANNED

    Do it yourself will be like playing with 100 razor blades
     
  15. roddinron
    Joined: May 24, 2006
    Posts: 2,677

    roddinron
    Member

    I knew a girl once who could suck the chrome off a trailer hitch..........wonder what ever happened to her?:rolleyes:
     
  16. gatz
    Joined: Jun 2, 2011
    Posts: 1,566

    gatz
    Member

    so,....if I have an inclination to weld, say Gr5, bolts into the existing bumper in lieu of the factory bolts to give it a "clean look"; how fine must the welds be ground down and what grit would be a good stage to stop at before taking to the platers? I talked to a "knowledgeable person" and he said to prep the surface by removing chrome around the area with a little heat and to make sure not to get any chrome in the weld. Additionally, that the surface should not have ANY pits in it. (sounds reasonable)

    OR,

    should I get that idea out of my head?
     
  17. BadassBadger
    Joined: Oct 24, 2010
    Posts: 461

    BadassBadger
    Member
    from wisconsin

    the smoother the better and cheaper but not 100% necessary as minor scratches and marks go away during the copper process. think of the copper plating equivalent to sanding primer on a car before paint. same concept
     
  18. Plating is only a few thousandths of an inch thick (0.003-0.004 inch thickness). It will just reflect everything that is underneath, that is why the prep is so important.

    Good chrome plating is actually three layers: copper first, then nickel, then chrome as top layer. The copper is put on and buffed to be real smooth. Think of it like primer for paint job. The nickel is the thickest layer and provides the main corrosion protection. The chrome is much thinner and is for appearance. Chrome is typically less than 0.001 inch thick.

    Do not confuse show chrome with hard chrome, they are significantly different processes. Hard chrome is up to 0.010 inch thick and is used for hydraulic cylinders. It is just chrome and is plated thick and usually ground precise. This is not what you want for your bumpers. Very poor corrosion resistance and is not as nice shiny appearance.
     
  19. greaseyknight
    Joined: Sep 27, 2010
    Posts: 225

    greaseyknight
    Member
    from Burley WA

    These videos seem to give a good overview of the chrome plating process, and might be helpful to those looking to get some chrome plating done.

    <iframe src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/BGH5zPiFEjw" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" width="560"></iframe>


    <iframe src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/rsxd4oovvBg" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" width="560"></iframe>
     
  20. go-twichy
    Joined: Jul 22, 2010
    Posts: 1,650

    go-twichy
    BANNED

    i think i married her.
     
  21. Tman
    Joined: Mar 2, 2001
    Posts: 34,155

    Tman
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    1993 called and want your car back!
     
  22. deto
    Joined: Jun 26, 2010
    Posts: 2,620

    deto
    Member

    93 was a good year. I was 7! Hahaha


    Posted from the TJJ App for iPhone & iPad
     
  23. bonez
    Joined: Jul 16, 2007
    Posts: 3,492

    bonez
    Member
    from Slow lane

    LOL not really thou, 93 its glad the 90s are over.
     
  24. bonez
    Joined: Jul 16, 2007
    Posts: 3,492

    bonez
    Member
    from Slow lane

    Anyway, since were talkin chrome.
    Say i made a grille with tubing, and i made some kinda deep scratches by mistake. should i weld'em up and grind'em flat before sending it out?
    If i dont and the chrome dude doesnt fix them, will they still show after plating?
     
  25. Yes. But a plater who cares about his reputation would either want you to fix them or do it himself. You'd need to discuss the details with him.
     
  26. westcoaster
    Joined: Sep 23, 2005
    Posts: 271

    westcoaster
    Member
    from SoCal

    ok, a little off topic, but getting back to welding the bumper bolts to bumper and grinding smooth for the custom look. when the bumper is chromed, do the bolts need to be chased? seems like the extra material on the bolts would be an issue. sorry for the ignorance, never had anything chromed yet.
     
  27. roddinron
    Joined: May 24, 2006
    Posts: 2,677

    roddinron
    Member

    You're a lucky man, tell her stubby says hello!:D
     
  28. pitman
    Joined: May 14, 2006
    Posts: 5,050

    pitman

     
  29. pasadenahotrod
    Joined: Feb 13, 2007
    Posts: 11,776

    pasadenahotrod
    Member
    from Texas

    The chromium plating is the protection from tarnish, rust and corrosion for the nickle plating whihc is what gives the brightness and shine to the plating job. The underlying copper coat ia a filler/primer for the decorative nickle and protective chromium coats.
     
  30. CutawayAl
    Joined: Aug 3, 2009
    Posts: 2,144

    CutawayAl
    Member
    from MI

    The answer to the question is, for a good quality job you should have a minimum 240 grit finish that is properly contoured with no imperfections or irregularities. But, like most things, doing the job right requires skill and knowledge most of us don't have. There is more to doing it right than one would think. making things smooth and shiny isn't too hard. Keeping surfaces flat and properly contoured, and free of waviness, irregularities, and imperfections requires talent and experience.

    Per my previous post, and as is shown in the video "greaseyknight" posted, unless you have the skills needed to do this work correctly the most you should do is make sure there are no pits or low spots, then let the metal finisher take it from there.
     

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