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Projects Straight 8 RPU build thread

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by bobbytnm, Oct 24, 2017.

  1. bobbytnm
    Joined: Dec 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,375

    bobbytnm
    Member

    Progress is being made on the open drive conversion. I acquired a Dana 35 yoke and have managed to get the splines taken out of it so that the original 6 spline drive line coupler will fit inside of it. Now I have to cut the coupler to length, and weld it to the yoke and close up the end of the yoke.
    I've made some measurements. Hopefully this weekend I'll get a chance to double check them and cut the coupler and the torque tube down to length.
    I'm getting closer....
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  2. MO54Frank
    Joined: Apr 1, 2019
    Posts: 349

    MO54Frank
    Member

    Great work! You won’t see another one like it at the Dairy Queen cruise.
    upload_2020-3-5_20-11-13.jpeg
    I like your early 70s Dodge Club Cab pickup.
     
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  3. bobbytnm
    Joined: Dec 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,375

    bobbytnm
    Member

    Thanks!
    The Dodge is a great truck. It was my grandfathers and only as 82,000 miles. It runs and drives great.
     
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  4. bobbytnm
    Joined: Dec 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,375

    bobbytnm
    Member

    A few more items off the checklist...
    I cut the coupler to length and welded it into the yoke. I also made a cap and welded that into the end of the yoke.
    That part of the open drive conversion is done. Now I need to cut the torque tube to length. Get my DOM tubing machined for the seal and press it into and weld it into the end of the torque tube.
    But, I decided to quite for the day. I'm battling a head cold and have run out of motivation for today...ugh
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  5. bobbytnm
    Joined: Dec 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,375

    bobbytnm
    Member

    I had a minor set back. So, I was following Tman's open drive conversion;
    https://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/threads/strawshop-opendrive-banjo-conversion-diy.324073/
    He used some 3" OD DOM and mentions that its almost a press fit into the torque tube. Well, I guess all torque tubes aren't created equal. I had a 1/16" difference between my DOM OD and the torque tube ID. I think the torque tube I used was a 36 or 37. I looked at a 40 TT and sure enough its constructed a bit different (but still seemed like the DOM wouldn't be a tight fit)
    Anyway, I cut off about a 3/4" length of the DOM and borrowed a buddy's lathe. I hogged out one end to accept the lip seal.
    To center everything up I decided that I'd bolt my cut off piece of TT to the diff, then put the seal and my seal holder (DOM) on the yoke and slip the yoke onto the splines. That way the seal will be centered on the yoke. After a bunch of measuring I spot welded the seal collar to the TT snout and then pulled it off the diff to weld out.
    So far I think its going to work.
    I still need to drill a couple of access holes and add some weld bungs so that I can access the pin that holds the yoke to the diff but I'm almost done.....woohooo
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  6. bobbytnm
    Joined: Dec 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,375

    bobbytnm
    Member

    I was digging around my nut/bolt/parts bin. I thought I had some 1/2" weld in pipe bungs and 1/2" plugs.
    while I did have some 1/2" plugs all I could find was one 3/8" weld fitting. Naturally the local hardware stores don't stock well fittings only couplers. I ended up cutting the ends off a 1/2" 90 degree elbow. I think with a bit of trimming I can make them work.
    I decided to use 1/2" to give me a decent size access hole to drive the pin in place. Now I just need to make some measurements, drill a couple of holes in the torque tube snout and weld these in place. I'll also have to pick up some flush plugs as all I have is the 1/2" plugs with the square ends.

    IMG_7273.JPEG IMG_7274.JPEG IMG_7275.JPEG
     
  7. Great back yard engineering! Rarely seen any more in these days of catalog ordering....
    Your getting closer to a first drive!
     
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  8. bobbytnm
    Joined: Dec 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,375

    bobbytnm
    Member

    Thanks Scott
    yea, I seem to be afflicted with a combination of being broke and being a tightwad. And I figure, that worse case scenario, if this all fails miserably then I can buy the ready made parts. I need to at least give it a go with what I have.

    Now, go get back to work on yours, We need a video of that engine together and running
     
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  9. winduptoy
    Joined: Feb 19, 2013
    Posts: 2,112

    winduptoy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    woohoo....looking good. Stay healthy
     
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  10. bobbytnm
    Joined: Dec 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,375

    bobbytnm
    Member

    The open drive conversion is done and dusted.
    I had some time today and drilled the pin access hole and then welded my home-made bungs to the housing.
    Just when I started to install the whole mess on the rear axle my neighbor called out with an offer for frosty beverages and I got a bit sidetracked.
    Maybe one night this week I'll get it installed..
    IMG_7342.JPEG
     
  11. Dick Stevens
    Joined: Aug 7, 2012
    Posts: 2,920

    Dick Stevens
    Member

    Priorities! :D
     
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  12. bobbytnm
    Joined: Dec 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,375

    bobbytnm
    Member

    99%
    I just can't seem to finish any one thing. I have the open drive at about 99%. I still need to drill the axle tube and add a vent and I need to get rid of the square pipe plugs and get some recessed plugs. So, 99% done.
    It seems like never quite get any one thing completely finished. I get it close and then move on to something else....ugh

    The next step will be to figure out clutch/brake pedal assy and associated linkages. I have an F-1 pedal assy and a pedal assy from a 40 Ford. I'm half tempted to go with a hydraulic clutch. I was looking at "pull" style slave cylinders online last night. This is going to take some "planning" (head scratching, beer drinking, hand wringing).

    IMG_7343.JPEG
     
  13. Nicely done on the drive conversion!
     
  14. bobbytnm
    Joined: Dec 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,375

    bobbytnm
    Member

    I've been a bit busy with other things but finally managed some shop time today.
    I started working on the clutch/brake pedal assy. I had 2 pedal assemblies to choose from; 48-52 Ford F1 truck or 1940 Ford truck. I opted for the 40 Ford assy as it seems to fit the area a bit better.
    I fabbed up some brackets which had to be a bit oddball shaped since the 40 Ford assy was originally mounted on the X bracing. I fabbed some brackets and got thing welded in place. I still need to fab and weld in some gussets but its 80% done.
    For the clutch pedal I'll have to make 2 new linkage ears and weld them to the bottom side of the pedal (they are currently on the top side) and I'll have to drill a new grease zerk hole. The brake pedal will just take a little bit of bending to make it work out right.

    My clutch kit should get here tomorrow. So, hopefully I can get my flywheel drilled out to fit the newer style pressure plate. Once thats done I can bolt all that together and then make a driveshaft and the driveline will be complete....woohoo

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  15. winduptoy
    Joined: Feb 19, 2013
    Posts: 2,112

    winduptoy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    it was about time for an update...thanks
     
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  16. bobbytnm
    Joined: Dec 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,375

    bobbytnm
    Member

    A few more steps forward....

    I don't know how it is for the rest of you guys but, some days I do killer work, and other days... ...well, no so much. Today was one of those kind of sloppy days.
    Yesterday I managed to lift the body and move it back a bit so I can start working on the clutch situation. With the body out of the way I figured I'd weld in the gussets for my bracket assy. I also had to drill a hole in the bracket assy for access for the brake like to run to the front. While I had the pedal assy out I installed new bushing in the pedals and cut, drilled, and welded a new linkage tabs on the clutch pedal. The linkage tabs were on the top of the pedal and originally pushed a linkage forward to activate a bellcrank for the clutch. I needed tabs on the bottom of the clutch so that when I step on the pedal it will pull on the clutch fork. I still need to drill and tap the pedals for grease fittings since I had to weld over where the original one was.
    So, once I come up with the linkage bits I should have working pedals.
    I'm also hoping to take my Packard flywheel and the T5 pressure plate to a machine shop this week to have the flywheel drilled for the pressure plate.

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  17. bobbytnm
    Joined: Dec 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,375

    bobbytnm
    Member

    I got my clutch kit in and I took the new pressure plate and the flywheel over the machine shop so that they can drill and tap a new set of mounting holes.
    I figured while I was waiting I could at least install the pilot bushing. Imagine my surprise when I looked at the back of the crank and there's no spot for a pilot bushing!!! Just a big open hole. An opening approx 2" in diameter and 1 1/4" deep. What the hell!?!?! I know I had the tranny stuck into the pilot bushing when I was mocking things up.
    Then it hit me. I was using a mock-up engine. So, I looked at the mock-up engine and sure enough there is a pilot bushing.... ...now what? I figured there's enough space in the end of the crank I could machine a slug to fit in there and hold the pilot bushing.
    Well today I was able to dig my mock-up engine out and take a close look at the crank. It looked like the pilot bushing was pressed into another piece. So, I rigged up a puller and worked it out. Well, it turns out its not a bushing at all, its an actual roller bearing. I cleaned it all up and it feels great. I'll be able to grease it and press it home in my working engine........WHEW!

    Here's the crank on my 327
    IMG_7516.JPEG

    Here's the crank on the 288 (mock-up engine)
    IMG_7515.JPEG

    IMG_7520.JPEG IMG_7522.JPEG IMG_7523.JPEG
     
  18. Crisis averted! Have a beer and celebrate!:)
     
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  19. LAROKE
    Joined: Sep 5, 2007
    Posts: 1,731

    LAROKE
    Member

    Personally, I think the bearings that some of the older engines used was the better way to go but I suppose bushings alone are the cheaper solution and why they became dominant.
     
  20. bobbytnm
    Joined: Dec 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,375

    bobbytnm
    Member

    Wow, it's been awhile.
    My schedule keeps moving along in a herky-jerky manner. Life seems to get in the way quite a bit.
    When last I checked in I was working on getting clutch and flywheel situated. I got the flywheel re-drilled to accept a modern pressure plate. But, then I decided that before I bolt the clutch together and get the tranny back on I had better address the pinhole in the oil pan and the modification to the bellhousing.
    Oil pan - my original oil pan had a pinhole that I had previously put a band-aid of JB Weld on. I had since bought another oil pan off of Ebay. Once I got the Ebay pan all cleaned up it had numerous pinholes. I spent several days trying to weld them up. .I'd weld a bit, blow a hole, fix the hole, weld a bit, grind it down smooth, test it with water and think I was good to go. I would then put some gasoline in it and it would weep like a sieve putting me back to square one with the welding, blowing holes, fixing holes, etc. I finally got it where it didn't leak.
    Once I pulled the original pan and cleaned it up I decided to fix it. The original hole that I had patched with JB Weld was more than a pinhole. This time I tried soldering. I cleaned it up real good, got it fluxed and soldered in up without any issues. Then I smeared JB Weld over it inside and out as a safety net and primed the pan before bolting it back on the engine.
    Bellhousing - I had to carve out a chunk of the GM bellhousing to clear the Packard starters nose cone. So I fashioned a piece of aluminum to cover up the cut out area. I tried my hand a "brazing" it but couldn't get the belhousing hot enough with a propane torch and was to nervous to fire up my Oxy/Acetylene torches. I found a friend of a friend that would TIG it together for me for a case of beer. Woohoo! done deal. The only draw back is that I'll have to wait a few days before I get it back.
    Once I get the bellhousing back I can get the clutch and trans all bolted together and back in the car. That will be a huge milestone as I think all of the major fabrication is done (with the exception of a driveshaft). Now it will get expensive as I'll have to rebuild and pretty up the brakes, suspension, brake lines, etc.
    I think I'll rig up a temp radiator and get the engine fired and run it up to temp. That will be a huge motivator.

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  21. PhilA
    Joined: Sep 6, 2018
    Posts: 794

    PhilA
    Member

    Do like this, but then I have a straight eight bias! I thought my Pontiac 8 was long, but this one takes the biscuit.

    Looking forward to seeing it come together fully.

    Phil
     
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  22. bobbytnm
    Joined: Dec 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,375

    bobbytnm
    Member

    Phil,
    Thanks! I supposedly have a good running Pontiac straight 8 with a 4spd Hydromatic trans. The guy is supposed to give it to me once he gets it pulled from the car.......suppossedly....

    Bobby
     
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  23. PhilA
    Joined: Sep 6, 2018
    Posts: 794

    PhilA
    Member

    The Packard is a better engine in terms of strength- it's a 9 main bearing unit, the Pontiac only having 5 mains and isn't as rev-happy. That's what sets the Packard and Buick 8's aside, the only advantage the Pontiac has is less weight and length.
    All things are relative, though...


    Phil
     
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  24. bobbytnm
    Joined: Dec 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,375

    bobbytnm
    Member

    One more little step forward;
    I got the bellhousing situation handled. I dropped it off at a buddy's shop and had the piece TIG welded on. Looks pretty good.
    Hopefully sometime this weekend I can get the clutch installed, bellhousing bolted on, and the tranny stabbed. After that I can get the measurements to get a driveshaft built. I think this is the last bit of major fabrication work on making this thing a car. Now its just a matter of going through and rebuilding brakes, springs, bushings, making brake lines, etc.
    IMG_7697.JPEG IMG_7698.JPEG
     
  25. bobbytnm
    Joined: Dec 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,375

    bobbytnm
    Member

    Sunday fun day!
    bellhousing alignment dowels tack welded into the transmission adapter....check
    clutch disc and pressure plate installed.....check
    bellhousing and throw out bearing installed....check
    transmission stabbed....check
    tranny mount re-installed....check
    body pulled forward and bolted in place......check.
    Steering linkage re-installed....check
    Take the Harley our for a ride on the 102 degree scorcher day.....check
    crack open a cold beer and enjoy the progress.....check, check, check!

    Hope everyone made a bit of progress on whatever project they have going
    Bobby IMG_7750.JPEG IMG_7751.JPEG IMG_7752.JPEG
     
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  26. Haven't looked at this project for quite awhile, but man it is coming along great. Old school all the way. You sure got some Mad Skills.
    Never seen another Packard straight 8 in a Hot Rod. My buddy Nads, has a Packard V-8 in his '34 Hot rod. He calls it the Pack-Ford.
     
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  27. Jorge cardozo
    Joined: May 30, 2019
    Posts: 8

    Jorge cardozo

    Hi Bobby, did you keep the original starter, flywheel and cluthch??

    Sent from my LM-Q710(FGN) using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
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  28. brading
    Joined: Sep 9, 2019
    Posts: 191

    brading
    Member

    Looking at the picture of the steering in post #265 I take it that you know that the max recommended angle of a steering UJ is 35 degrees.
     
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  29. ^^^^^and I suspect that you will require some intermediate supports as well. Had a long multi joint shaft like that on one of my builds and it had too much slop in the steering.
     
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  30. bobbytnm
    Joined: Dec 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,375

    bobbytnm
    Member

    I managed to keep the Packard starter and flywheel but I'm using a late model GM diaphragm style clutch. I took the Packard flywheel to a machinist and had him redrill it for the GM pattern. I got some clutch linkage hooked up yesterday, so far it feels like it's all going to work together.
     
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