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Screw in studs-Whose installed them?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by tnrotter, Feb 8, 2010.

  1. tnrotter
    Joined: Mar 15, 2009
    Posts: 293

    tnrotter
    Member
    from Tennessee

    Got a 289 that got rocker studs backing out of the heads. Whats the best way to thread the heads for screw in studs and get them in straight? tnrotter
     
  2. I think it would be best to have a machine shop do it on a milling machine.
     
  3. 61falcon
    Joined: Jan 1, 2009
    Posts: 772

    61falcon
    Member

    i agree, thats best left to a machine shop. or buy a set of late model heads. they are made for bolt on rockers.
     
  4. I agree, machine shop
     

  5. Hotrodbuilderny
    Joined: Mar 20, 2009
    Posts: 1,646

    Hotrodbuilderny
    Member

    I agree You are probably better off sending them out there use to be a tool that guided off the stud next to the one that was out so you could get he angle right but I am pretty sure the bosses are to high to use a stud that incorporates a hex so they would have to be milled down you could press in an oversize stud and then drill and pin them but if you are running any serious spring ressure you stand a chance of snapping them
     
  6. Triggerman
    Joined: Nov 18, 2006
    Posts: 578

    Triggerman
    Member
    from NorCal

    I agree with Hotrodbuilderny, the bosses must be milled flat for the hex portion of the screw in stud to tighten against. This is not a procedure that you accomplish while the heads are on the engine much less in the car. If you have machining equipment at home then you got it made. Of course you would likely not be asking us this question then.

    Joe
     
  7. HEATHEN
    Joined: Nov 22, 2005
    Posts: 7,591

    HEATHEN
    Member
    from SIDNEY, NY

    Somewhere in my junk, I've got the tools I bought from Crane many years ago to accomplish this task on sbc heads. One tool cut the stud bosses down to the proper height and machined the top square, and the other tool was a rectangular steel block that piloted off one stud hole while it started the tap straight in the other hole--then you flipped it around and did it again, four times per head. I did quite a few pairs of heads this way and never had any misalignment problems.
     

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