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proper braided hose cutter?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by J&JHotrods, Apr 28, 2010.

  1. J&JHotrods
    Joined: Oct 22, 2008
    Posts: 549

    J&JHotrods
    Member

    Found something that caught my eye, and was curious if anyone has used this with any success.
    Not quite to the point of doing fluid plumbing just yet, but I like to be prepared with the necessary tools to get the job done when the task arises.
    I found a cool video online about cutting braided hose using a sharp chisel and a chunk of aluminum flat plate. One good whack and bingo-nice clean straight cut. No longer will I use a cutoff wheel, hacksaw, etc... Luckily most of my hose will be of the ultra light variety, but I saw these in the summit catalog and was wondering if they work worth a darn. Looks like they would work a few times and then become a braided hose kinker after the sharp edge wears off. Anyone use these with any success for cutting braided hose?
     

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  2. Skeezix
    Joined: Jan 10, 2007
    Posts: 845

    Skeezix
    Member
    from SoCal

    They can split the Teflon -3 and -4 behind the weave and cause an mindnumbing search for the source, ask me how I know
     
  3. UnsettledParadox
    Joined: Apr 25, 2007
    Posts: 1,107

    UnsettledParadox
    Member

    what do you recommend?
     
  4. oj
    Joined: Jul 27, 2008
    Posts: 6,281

    oj
    Member

    Those are electrical cable cutter, the stainless braid will wear them right out and cause a hell'uva mess. I have done-literally-hundreds and hundreds of braid cuts etc and use an 18t bandsaw. Just be sure to wash out the hose after putting the ends on them as they'll be full of trash. Blowing air won't do the trick, i stick it under a water spigot.
    The -3 & 4 teflon braid layback for the olive is a whore. They sell a special tool for it - you can have mine. I use a small screwdriver and try not to run the damn thing up under my thumbnail while opening the braid up. One direction (with the weave) is easy, when you go against the weave is a task.
     

  5. tudorkeith
    Joined: May 10, 2009
    Posts: 454

    tudorkeith
    Member

    That cutter is the only thing I would ever use on my braided lines. I struggled trying saws, chisel method, cutting wheel, always frayed. then I bought that cutter from summit for like $40 and it works awesome. a little tape and perfect cut, fittings go right on. worth every penny! the one pictured is not a regular cable cutter, believe me I tried a regular large cable cutter and didn't work. just buy it! I have had mine for over a year, did my whole fuel line. just used them recently and still cut clean many cuts later
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2010
  6. J&JHotrods
    Joined: Oct 22, 2008
    Posts: 549

    J&JHotrods
    Member

    That pic is from the summit catalog. I thought they looked like cable cutters too; that's what prompted me to post a question. I do like how a cutoff wheel goes through it like butter, but I never have that warm fuzzy feeling about getting all of the debris out of the line. After that, I got a scrap piece of 1" thick aluminum block and the sharpest chisel I could find, and practiced on some similar braided hose (washing machine braided hose-better to fuck it up than the real thing) and either my chisel just isn't sharp enough or I'm not doing it right or whatever....sounds like I'm on the hunt for some real deal cutters.
    Thanks for solid input fellas...
     
  7. I've been using that Summit one for about 5 years now. No problems.
     
  8. The Mandrill
    Joined: Nov 11, 2009
    Posts: 191

    The Mandrill
    Member
    from Tulsa

    We do custom lines at our shop on a weekly basis, the cutter in the pic is the only way to go. Almost a guarantee of no trash in the line. Recommended
     
  9. Gasserman
    Joined: Oct 14, 2005
    Posts: 616

    Gasserman
    Member
    from Tulsa OK

    You can also get the same one from Speedway Motors and it`s a lot cheaper. I`ve got one and have used it for several years . And it`s cutting just fine. Gasserman
     
  10. Skeezix
    Joined: Jan 10, 2007
    Posts: 845

    Skeezix
    Member
    from SoCal

    Tape the cutspot with racers tape, death wheel ( Teflon will melt a bit ) clean the Teflon ratty burnt edge, un wrap tape, Slip on the female ( if you haven't already, use -3/4 spreader tool from earls to
    properly seperate the weave from the tube. Install the olive, insert the end and tighten to .015" gap ( or match book cover )
    clean the line with break cleaner and plug properly. Clean cloud flush before installing line.
    Learned from Carroll Smith and it's spelled out in Prepare to Win and Nuts Bolts Fasteners and Plumbing too. Also on the earls and goodridge website.
     
  11. krusty40
    Joined: Jan 10, 2006
    Posts: 848

    krusty40
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I've done thousands of hoses from -3 to -24 and used about every method to cut 'em. Tape and death wheel works the best, especially since there's no investment in special tooling. vic
     
  12. scottybaccus
    Joined: Mar 13, 2006
    Posts: 4,109

    scottybaccus
    Member

    agreed.

    Quick blast of brake parts cleaner/compressed air to clean it out, and you are all set.
     
  13. My vote goes for a GOOD Beverly shear (yeah, it's expensive). I worked in a shop where we made AN hoses and crimped teflon brake lines all the time. Owner had been using the same shear for about 20 years (that's all it was used for), and it had never given a problem. The ends wouldn't "broom" even using masking tape. Until you've tried it, you just don't understand...
     
  14. gary terhaar
    Joined: Jul 23, 2007
    Posts: 656

    gary terhaar
    Member
    from oakdale ny

    I just got my b-2 and this will be the method i try next for shure.
    A masons chisel or brick chisel is about 4 inches wide,sharpen it and place a thich piece of alluminum under it.At least 3/4 to 1/2 thick and use a 5 lb maul hammer.
    Tape the ends and strike it with a commited blow.One shot is all it usally takes.
    Done it for years this way with great results,The b-2 may change that but i can always go to my chisel if need be.
     
  15. I still use a hack saw. Tape the place you want to cut and go after it.
     
  16. Weasel
    Joined: Dec 30, 2007
    Posts: 6,693

    Weasel
    Member

  17. Lucky3
    Joined: Dec 9, 2009
    Posts: 652

    Lucky3
    Member

    18t - 21t band saws work really well !

    That electrical cable cutter works OK at best on small hoses < #6......

    Quit using the braided hose several years ago as there is way better stuff to use called Pro-Lite hose. You can cut it with scissors !!!
     
  18. denis4x4
    Joined: Apr 23, 2005
    Posts: 3,814

    denis4x4
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Colorado

    That Summit tool looks an awful lot like some garden loppers I have in the garden shed! I use tape and a bolt cutter with one leg of the cutter in a vise so that I can make a single quick cut.
     
  19. $$$$ I'm with Beaner on this one !! I have a hacksaw just for this purpose and it has an ULTRA FINE BLADE as in lots of teeth per inch !!! >>>>.
     
  20. Beverly Shear Mfg
    Joined: Sep 1, 2009
    Posts: 42

    Beverly Shear Mfg
    Member
    from Dyer,IN

    Both the B-1 and the B-2 shears are excellent for braided hose. We sell multiple shears to shops that specialize in braided hose for automotive and industrial applications.
     

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