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No-Sew door panel tech...

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by skipstitch, Jun 18, 2006.

  1. skipstitch
    Joined: Oct 7, 2001
    Posts: 1,177

    skipstitch
    Member

    1a.JPG 1a.JPG 1.JPG 2.JPG One of my favorite things about the H.A.M.B are the tech posts… so, I thought I’d take a stab at one. The following is the breakdown for fabbing your own door panels from scratch. Since not everyone has a sewing machine sittin’ in the corner of the shop… and because we all dig 2 inch pleats… I’ll show this example using press pleat vinyl. All of the supplies described are available from your local trim shop, hardware store or online.

    First up, you need to prep your door for the pattern. Make sure all old clips or screws are removed as well as your inside handles and garnish (window trim) mouldings. From here, it’s a good idea to run a 1/4” drill bit through the existing clip holes. (Use a drill stop….trust me!!!!) This is to make sure your clips will snap into place with little effort. If your door doesn’t have holes yet… mark them in about 5/8” and roughly 5” apart all the way around the door. Next up, cut a piece of butcher paper or contractors paper (available at the hardware store in rolls) larger than your door. Spray it on one side with a liberal amount of 3m Super77 spray can glue (another hardware store item). Once you have it good and sticky, take it to your door and stick it with plenty of paper hanging past the edges. Now trace the edges with a pencil and poke all of the door panel clip holes. Also mark any door handles or window cranks.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2018
  2. skipstitch
    Joined: Oct 7, 2001
    Posts: 1,177

    skipstitch
    Member

    3.JPG 4.JPG Next, remove the paper from the door and head to the work bench. Stick the paper to your door panel board. Shown is “waterproof” cardboard available from trim shops… but we use 1/8” luan from the hardware store. (It’s cheaper) Either will work just fine. Stay away from masonite as it will wick moisture and will warp. In the photo, I’ve highlighted the pencil markings with black marker for better detail. Smooth the paper out on your board. Trim the paper on your pencil marks with a razor blade and mark all of the clip & handle holes. Remove the paper and cut the door panel out with a razor knife.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2018
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  3. skipstitch
    Joined: Oct 7, 2001
    Posts: 1,177

    skipstitch
    Member

    5.JPG 6.JPG door-panel-clip.jpg From this point, you’re gonna want to mark for punching your clip holes. You need to move in 1/2” from the marks you made with your paper pattern and make an X at each clip mark… this is due to the offset in the clips (we use Au-ve-co #1720’s) Punch your holes on the X using a 3/8” hole punch…. Once the clip slides in the offset hole, the spring part will be centered in the hole. You’ll also need to cut or punch holes for your handles.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2018
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  4. skipstitch
    Joined: Oct 7, 2001
    Posts: 1,177

    skipstitch
    Member

    7.JPG Now, install the clips and pop the panel on the door. Your paper pattern should have your panel fitting pretty good, but additional trimming may be needed. It’s a great time to close the door to make sure things don’t rub… and also a good idea to fit the garnish moulding to be sure your panel fits properly under it.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2018
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  5. skipstitch
    Joined: Oct 7, 2001
    Posts: 1,177

    skipstitch
    Member

    8.JPG Next up,remove the panel (a flat putty knife pops the clips great) and remove the clips. Design the panel… my favorite part! For this one we chose a simple pleated center with smooth vinyl at the top and bottom. You could also do carpet on the bottom…. But since this is a NO SEW design the vinyl works best.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2018
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  6. skipstitch
    Joined: Oct 7, 2001
    Posts: 1,177

    skipstitch
    Member

    9.JPG This step shows the pleats installed. Cut ‘em the width of your design and leave a few inches hanging past the edges of the panel. You will need to use a good contact cement to attach the pleats. You can get it from the local trim shop, but the stuff you get from a hardware store works just as well (we’ve used it in a pinch). Lowes and Home Depot carry DAP brand in quarts. It can be sprayed through a cheap paint gun or brushed. Follow the directions on the can….. STAY AWAY from the Super77 or aerosol glues. I don’t think they are heavy duty enough to handle the weight of the vinyl or heat the panel will see. ALSO in the pic is 1/2” wide C-chrome. It comes in 6 feet lengths from trim shops….it’s the stuff they used to put around the vinyl landau (fake convertible) tops on late 70’s and early 80’s production cars. It’s anodized aluminum and is really easy to work with….. More on this later….
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2018
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  7. skipstitch
    Joined: Oct 7, 2001
    Posts: 1,177

    skipstitch
    Member

    10.JPG 11.JPG 12.JPG Now the smooth sections….. You’ll need some 1/2” poly foam (local trim shop). Cut it oversized and spray it & the panel with contact cement. Wait for it to dry, then butt the foam up to the pleats and press into place. Trim the foam even with the edge of the board with a razor blade. Follow with the smooth vinyl as above… repeat as needed, leaving the extra vinyl stick past the edge of the panel.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2018
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  8. skipstitch
    Joined: Oct 7, 2001
    Posts: 1,177

    skipstitch
    Member

    13.JPG Flip the panel over and glue the back of the board and vinyl. Trim the vinyl within’ 3/4” of the board…. On the corners, trim it on an angle (as pictured). Wrap the corners first and then roll the rest around the board. You’re almost finished.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2018
  9. skipstitch
    Joined: Oct 7, 2001
    Posts: 1,177

    skipstitch
    Member

    There are no pix of this step, but… cut the C-chrome to length. 10/32 Truss head machine screws fit perfectly into the back of the chrome. Slide them in, positioned 4 or 5”’ apart. Once you’ve trimmed the chrome, you’ll find the ends of it bend easily for a finished look (you may have to file and polish them a bit for a smooth edge). Position your trim between the pleats and smooth sections… locate the machine screw and punch corresponding holes…. Poke ’em through and attach them with nuts. It’s a good idea to use Lock-tite
     
  10. skipstitch
    Joined: Oct 7, 2001
    Posts: 1,177

    skipstitch
    Member

    14.JPG Finally, re-install the clips and head to the door… Pop, pop, pop and you have a panel. Cut holes for the handles and install...

    Rinse, and repeat....
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2018
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  11. chrisntx
    Joined: Jan 20, 2006
    Posts: 1,798

    chrisntx
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    from Texas .

  12. scarliner
    Joined: Sep 3, 2003
    Posts: 622

    scarliner
    Member
    from Macon Mo.

    Skip, super tech for us down and out lo-buckers.The interior is always the hard part and sometimes never gets done on my stuff.I think this needs to go in tech -o-matic. Thanks!
     
  13. MyOldBuick
    Joined: Jan 25, 2005
    Posts: 606

    MyOldBuick
    Member

    Very cool! My interior is too cherry on the Buick to do this little mod, but I might actually use the idea on my cabin cruiser. It might liven up my dull side panels.
     
  14. John B
    Joined: Mar 9, 2001
    Posts: 1,360

    John B
    Member

    Wow. I've read those how to books, but I've learned more from these posts. Alot more.


    By the way. The updated website rocks.
     
  15. 52pickup
    Joined: Aug 11, 2004
    Posts: 833

    52pickup
    Member
    from Tucson, Az

    I may be a little dim... but how were the pleats done? How were they made to be pleats?
     
  16. MyOldBuick
    Joined: Jan 25, 2005
    Posts: 606

    MyOldBuick
    Member

    This was kind of glossed over but it's here: "I’ll show this example using press pleat vinyl"


    Which you can find online here for example:

    http://www.garysupholstery.com/foamback.html
     
  17. skipstitch
    Joined: Oct 7, 2001
    Posts: 1,177

    skipstitch
    Member

    Thanks Buick... guess I didn't think about that.... But the pleats are part of the vinyl. It's foam backed and the pleat is created by die-electric stamping (atleast thats my take on it) a 1/4" wide impression every 1 1/2 inches. No exposed stitching to worry about cutting and unraveling... That website is an excellent source for the stuff.

    JohnB...thanks on the website... I do it in all my "spare" time :)
     
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  18. 52pickup
    Joined: Aug 11, 2004
    Posts: 833

    52pickup
    Member
    from Tucson, Az

    Thanks for clearing that up... I wasnt sure if you had done some magic with foam under there or what. That stuffs pretty cool.

    And thanks for the great tech, too.
     
  19. chromedRAT
    Joined: Mar 5, 2002
    Posts: 1,724

    chromedRAT
    Member

    bitchin, man. seeing this guy's work in real life, he's a freakin genius.
     
  20. Thorkle Rod
    Joined: May 24, 2006
    Posts: 1,392

    Thorkle Rod
    Member

    Cool man, pretty good stuff, It looks like you have this subject COVERED
     
  21. Harms Way
    Joined: Nov 27, 2005
    Posts: 6,869

    Harms Way
    Member

    I might just give this a try,..... Thanks !
     
  22. fatluckys
    Joined: Jan 3, 2002
    Posts: 721

    fatluckys
    Member

    Good post! I'm gonna have to give the c-chrome a try.
     
  23. I did my Plymouth door panels using that pre-pleated stuff from Gary's Upholstery. It's great stuff. I could'nt find it here in kiwiville, and Gary does'nt ship overseas, so I had to get a friend who lives State-side to get it and ship it to me. It was worth it.
     
  24. skipstitch
    Joined: Oct 7, 2001
    Posts: 1,177

    skipstitch
    Member


    You can curve it too...
     

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  25. dana barlow
    Joined: May 30, 2006
    Posts: 4,344

    dana barlow
    Member
    from Miami Fla.
    1. Y-blocks


    :eek: red no red:confused: WTF no red,
    ]Ya i know some place on another site,!
    Thanks for the tech cool info
     
  26. AHotRod
    Joined: Jul 27, 2001
    Posts: 11,367

    AHotRod
    Member

    I'm glad I found this today !!!!!!! :)
     
  27. KarlsKustom
    Joined: Sep 2, 2005
    Posts: 88

    KarlsKustom
    Member


    Would it be possible to put a 3"-4" radius in that c-chrome to do a floating rectangular insert in a panel?
     
  28. Roothawg
    Joined: Mar 14, 2001
    Posts: 21,419

    Roothawg
    Member

    Sweet. Ck your mail, Skip.
     
  29. 54velox
    Joined: Aug 8, 2006
    Posts: 48

    54velox
    Member
    from Australia

    Fantastic thread. Anyone in Australia know where to get this "C-Chrome"?

    I found where to get the pleated vinyl, but can't track down the C section trim.
     
  30. B + M
    Joined: Aug 5, 2006
    Posts: 139

    B + M
    Member
    from sacramento

    great post! I just had my first upholstery lesson from my mom yesterday. This was a perfect time to find this post. Nice job very inspiring.
     

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