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Technical New here fellas! I have some ??? regarding Dodge B-series trucks

Discussion in 'Traditional Hot Rods' started by Chevy3+3, Jan 7, 2017.

  1. Chevy3+3
    Joined: Jan 7, 2017
    Posts: 2

    Chevy3+3

    My dad and I are in the process of resurrecting my grandads old 1950 Dodge B series. What I do know is it has a 4 speed, 116 wheel base and overload springs. I believe that makes it a 3/4 ton?

    So my question is......Did the long beds have a different box width than the shortbeds? The bed with on the longbed I have is around 54-55". I picked up a B-series high side short bed and the width of the box measures about 49-50". Another question is was the axle the same width regardless of the bed widths? We're the frame widths between the 1/2t and 3/4t different widths as well?

    Anyone with any knowledge of these trucks would be greatly appreciated. I was hoping to modify the long bed frame to accept a shortbed. The bed on the truck is pretty beat up and I think the shortbed would look better.
     
  2. manyolcars
    Joined: Mar 30, 2001
    Posts: 8,063

    manyolcars

    those werent used for traditional hotrods. There is probably a forum somewhere for them
     
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  3. Chevy3+3
    Joined: Jan 7, 2017
    Posts: 2

    Chevy3+3

    I know they aren't considered "traditional". But through many Google searches I've seen the B-series discussed on the H.A.M.B. That's what brought me here to this group. I thought maybe someone amongst the group has the answers I'm looking for. I've tried to find other forums specific to the B-series but haven't had much luck
     
  4. But can he make it one? He already wants to shortin the bed. It's a 1950. 50 ford pickups kick ass maybe he can build a badass 50 ram pickup.
     
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  5. dwollam
    Joined: Oct 22, 2012
    Posts: 823

    dwollam
    Member

    Dodge trucks were "Job Rated" back then. Not exactly 1/2 ton 3/4 ton as we know them now. Yes the heavier pickups had taller/wider beds. I had a '52 that was like a 3/4 ton but had 5 bolt wheels although it was a much larger pattern than the typical 4 1/2 bolt circle car or pickup pattern.

    Couldn't tell ya on the frame width or axle width although every couple years the axles tended to be wider than the previous years. A '58 1/2 ton I bought for parts had a much wider rear axle than my '36 1/2 ton but the rear bumper and rear of frame width were identical.
     
  6. ratman
    Joined: Jun 15, 2006
    Posts: 423

    ratman
    Member

    Ha ha ha ha ha another basher
     
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  7. ratman
    Joined: Jun 15, 2006
    Posts: 423

    ratman
    Member

    3 Generations of history wow that's pretty cool, I don't know much about your truck but don't let the keyboard bashers put you off staying here.
    There's plenty to learn and I wish you luck with your project.
     
  8. Fortunateson
    Joined: Apr 30, 2012
    Posts: 2,700

    Fortunateson
    Member

    The previous series, '39-47, were "Job Rated" while the next series were known as Pilot House. And they were known as 1/2 , 3/4 tons etc. but there were variations that could be ordered to fit the customers needs.
    Stick around, there are plenty of very helpful people here with the occasional "expert" chiming in. To me this "traditional" refers more to the style of build rather than "usual" or "common" builds. By the way, there is a forum for the B series trucks but I can' t think of the name right now.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2017
  9. DRAG-ULA
    Joined: Sep 2, 2013
    Posts: 2

    DRAG-ULA
    Member
    from My garage

    I've got a 48 1/2 ton Dodge, perpetual project, hahaha. Anyway, I'm pretty sure it's a high side bed, but a short box. If you want I'll measure the bed dimensions. I'm going to be pulling the original axle out & swapping in an 8 3/4". I can get some width numbers off that too.
     
  10. Welcome to the HAMB.
    Just ignore the occasional keyboard miscreants .......
    Sounds like a good project. Ya got pics of the little jewel??
     
  11. 56C3B6
    Joined: Mar 2, 2010
    Posts: 35

    56C3B6
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from central NY

    The general forum here will get you more information than being in the traditional hotrod forum, and P15-D24.com has a forum dedicated specifically to B series Dodge Trucks. Both places have a ton of information that helped me out numerous times.
     
  12. dwollam
    Joined: Oct 22, 2012
    Posts: 823

    dwollam
    Member

    I would have to respectfully disagree with the above statement. I have owned both of the range of years you mentioned and my '42 never said "Job Rated" and my '52 did. I am familiar with the Pilot House terminology but I don't think that was ever actually on the trucks, where "Job Rated" was.

    On a different note, if looking for more power one should look for a '58-'59 230 engine (135-138hp) or the bigger longer 25" blocks which are pretty much bolt in swaps. For the 25" engines, the radiator gets more forward on the core support. That is about all that's needed other than exhaust differences and a few minor changes. My '36 LC pickup has a '58 230 6 cyl. which is nearly double the 70hp of the original 201. It currently has 4.11 gears which gives me 60mph pulling a small camper trailer up or down hills. A later rear end is in the works to give me better highway speeds without having to run really tall tires. My '52 Job Rated with a '51 DeSoto engine was driven daily at 65mph back and forth to work years ago.
     
  13. falcongeorge
    Joined: Aug 26, 2010
    Posts: 18,341

    falcongeorge
    Member
    from BC

    yes, but since when is the HAMB about traditional hot rods?;)
     
  14. Fortunateson
    Joined: Apr 30, 2012
    Posts: 2,700

    Fortunateson
    Member

    Well I could be wrong, it has happened a couple of times in my life. A Hemings article entitled, "A Job Well Done" refers to the roll out of the '39 Dodge trucks with that term. I have seen other references as well including a cloth banner with the front part of the '39-47 trucks illustrated and in bold test Job Rated. Perhaps eh like the term so much they used it for both series? So I guess we are probably both correct. Now, when did they stop using that term? LOL
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2017
  15. 302GMC
    Joined: Dec 15, 2005
    Posts: 5,886

    302GMC
    Member
    from Idaho

    Here's one I worked on last summer. Dual pipes, turn signals, some tune-up work. Has a radio & a fresh air heater. They're rarely seen in this part of the country without the "Pileup House" windows and the big box. But, of course it ain't a hot rod ... HPIM8398.JPG HPIM8397.JPG HPIM8399.JPG
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2017
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  16. gene-koning
    Joined: Oct 28, 2016
    Posts: 1,539

    gene-koning
    Member

    According to the book "Dodge Pickups, History And Restoration guide 1918-1971", The 39-47 trucks were referred to as the "Job Rated era" because the trucks were built to meet specific weight demands.
    The 48-53 trucks were known as the Pilot House Era because of the larger cabs with large windows that made it easy to see out of. They retained the Job Rated class ratings that had been so popular in he 39-47 truck line.
    In 1948 Dodge introduced a new box on their trucks that was practical, rather then aesthetic. It was simply higher, wider, and deeper then anyone had made before, and then the competition would make for several years more.
    For 1/2 tons the new body was 3/4" wider, for 3/4 and 1 ton, it was 6 3/4" wider. Flareboards and tailgates were 5 1/2" higher giving a whopping 40% increase in capacity of the box of the truck it replaced. The new box was simply called the high-side box. A 9' long box was available on a 1 ton pickup.
    In 1950 a "new" low-sided box became available only on the 1/2 ton pickup. They used the box sides from the 39-47 pickup to accomplish this. The low-side became the standard box, and he high-side became an extra cost option. The book notes that more high-sided boxes were installed then there were low-side boxes.
    1954-1956 trucks were known as the Functional Design Era. This truck was redesigned from the 52 & 53, but retained the Job Rated motto. The redesigned cab featured a curved windshield. A V8 was introduced in mid 1954. Mid way through 1955, the cab was again redesigned with a curved wrap-a-round windshield. I thought I remembered reading somewhere in the book that towards the end of 56 the high-sided box went away, but didn't see it tonight.
    The book has proven to be pretty reliable as far as information is concerned. Gene
     
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  17. dwollam
    Joined: Oct 22, 2012
    Posts: 823

    dwollam
    Member

    Now that sounds like information I can rely on! I just didn't think the '47 and earlier said "job rated" on them but maybe they did. Sure don't remember it on my '42 but was for sure on the '52. The '52 had the taller wider longer bed.
    Thanks for enlightening me! Guess I am not too old to learn something!

    Dave
     
  18. gene-koning
    Joined: Oct 28, 2016
    Posts: 1,539

    gene-koning
    Member

    The Dodge trucks of the early 30s took on weight ratings. The Job Rated thing was a direct result of the Dodge trucks used in WWI where the GIs knew what they could put on the Dodge by what it was called. A 1/2 ton safely hauled a 1/2 ton of payload, a 3/4 ton safely hauled 3/4 ton payload, a 1 ton safely hauled a 1 ton payload and so on. The trucks were rated for the capacity they were intended to haul, and they were able to haul what they said they could. I'm not sure the Job Rated motto was ever on the trucks, but the guys returning from war knew it could do the job it was rated for. The new and upgraded 39-47 version of the trucks just reinforced that knowledge, so the new trucks were designated at Dodge as Job Rated trucks.

    The "all new" 48 Dodge was a result of the Dodge trucks used in WWII. The new truck had more space inside and was easier to see things outside, with a cab based on a the pilot house on a tug boat. The Job Rated motto was added to the truck's grill and was intended to remind the older GIs that these were still the same work horse Dodge trucks as the previous version, just a better truck with pilot house like cab windows. Gene
     
  19. Fortunateson
    Joined: Apr 30, 2012
    Posts: 2,700

    Fortunateson
    Member

    Well thanks for that research; everybody's a winner! The low side box was essentially the same as the '39-47 I believe.
     

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