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Featured Hot Rods Model A body on ‘32 chassis WITH FENDERS- Help!

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by RiffRaffRoadster, Dec 24, 2018.

  1. jimgoetz
    Joined: Sep 6, 2013
    Posts: 188

    jimgoetz
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  2. Stogy
    Joined: Feb 10, 2007
    Posts: 9,911

    Stogy
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    That is better @loudbang...is that a 29? Even if it is it really has that look me thinks.

    It's one thing to find examples of Hotrods with a period look but finding the pics from the period are golden.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2019
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  3. ROADSTER1927
    Joined: Feb 14, 2009
    Posts: 2,423

    ROADSTER1927
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    Do an overdrive manual trans. The benefits are many and you will thank yourself later! Gary
     
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  4. Stogy
    Joined: Feb 10, 2007
    Posts: 9,911

    Stogy
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    So @RiffRaffRoadster did you dig any more vintage pics of You and Dad with the Roadster or other pics with just it from back in the days when he had it out and about?

    You already have shown us more than the typical 1 only pic...:D...I know, but just thought I'd ask...maybe some Aunt's,Uncle's or other close realatives may have some to share...it's worth asking...;)
     
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  5. RiffRaffRoadster
    Joined: Dec 24, 2018
    Posts: 307

    RiffRaffRoadster
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    I think There May be in his vast collection of slides. Next time I go see my Mom, I’ll get his projector out and look through them.


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  6. Stogy
    Joined: Feb 10, 2007
    Posts: 9,911

    Stogy
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    :rolleyes:...that is exciting Riff...;)
     
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  7. RiffRaffRoadster
    Joined: Dec 24, 2018
    Posts: 307

    RiffRaffRoadster
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    Question Hambers: the rear body panel below the trunk lid has some crude repair welds showing where there used to be taillights cut into the panel back in the car’s hi boy days. This wasn’t known until the body was blasted (these were covered over with bondo). I want to keep the car like we found it, with the Model A taillights mounted to the rear fenders. I hate to cut out this cool link to the past, but it needs to be done. Any other options? Bondo the crap out of it again so this clue can be found by future owners down the road? Cut it out and reweld a replacement panel and save the original panel and hang it on the wall?


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  8. big duece
    Joined: Jul 28, 2008
    Posts: 5,271

    big duece
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    from kansas

    A lot of that can be smoothed out with a hammer/dolly, holes can be filled with welds. Sure could reuse it and take way less skim filler to make it smooth. A good body man could make it flawless, its only metal right?
     
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  9. flatford39
    Joined: Dec 3, 2006
    Posts: 2,091

    flatford39
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    Those panels are pretty easy to find. Coupe and roadster are the same. Since your paying for bodywork I would look for a replacement. Try Bert's in Denver. He has a lot of used parts and there is always Bville.

    They come up at swaps all the time when you are not looking for them or there is always Ebay.
     
  10. Stogy
    Joined: Feb 10, 2007
    Posts: 9,911

    Stogy
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    Looking at your ride blasted did expose what is quite typical of many old Hotrod bodies...they have been bashed around. Many people call bodymen hacks but their job was to smooth it out and make it look good and I believe yours was given the creamy/lead love so many get...that blasting did make for a challenge but it's a learning curve of a different extreme to chassis building or any of the other trade functions.

    One thing you are doing is walking in their shoes and appreciation for these tradesman is quickly realized.

    Again you enjoy the mixed journey to the finished product...I had that rear panel replaced on my former coupe and was left unsure I had made the right decision due to outcome, one and cost.

    If the metal is solid hammer weld the former holes and smooth the whole panel as well as the other areas and skin and finish...remembering it takes skill and knowledge to get it right.
     
  11. tb33anda3rd
    Joined: Oct 8, 2010
    Posts: 14,177

    tb33anda3rd
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  12. Stogy
    Joined: Feb 10, 2007
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    Stogy
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  13. RiffRaffRoadster
    Joined: Dec 24, 2018
    Posts: 307

    RiffRaffRoadster
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  14. RiffRaffRoadster
    Joined: Dec 24, 2018
    Posts: 307

    RiffRaffRoadster
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    Do we need to replace the entire panel, or just cut out the section with the old taillight welds and replace with new steel?
     
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  15. big duece
    Joined: Jul 28, 2008
    Posts: 5,271

    big duece
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    from kansas

    That might be a question for your metal guy, you know the panel that's in there now fits.
     
  16. tb33anda3rd
    Joined: Oct 8, 2010
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  17. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 13,086

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    I've gotta tell you the bodyman might have more time making a replacement panel fit than smoothing out the old one. Brookville makes nice parts, but I wouldn't bet the farm that it will bolt in without a bit of slicing and dicing.
     
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  18. jimgoetz
    Joined: Sep 6, 2013
    Posts: 188

    jimgoetz
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    From the pictures it looks like a good body man wouldn't have too much trouble metalworking that out and then just skim coat it. It would still be visible from the inside of the panel so the history would still be there for the nit pickers. ha ha
     
  19. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 13,086

    alchemy
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    I think the history on the inside of the panel would be the best reason to keep the original panel.
     
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  20. mlagusis
    Joined: Oct 11, 2009
    Posts: 921

    mlagusis
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    If you are putting a three speed in, I would suggest putting a 3 speed over drive. Also, glad to see you are moving forward on this. Good luck!
     
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  21. jimgoetz
    Joined: Sep 6, 2013
    Posts: 188

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    You should see the inside of my firewall for just this reason.
     
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  22. RiffRaffRoadster
    Joined: Dec 24, 2018
    Posts: 307

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    I like that approach-thanks Jim


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  23. goldmountain
    Joined: Jun 12, 2016
    Posts: 649

    goldmountain

    Since this is an available repro panel, I suggest that it would be a good piece to develop your welding and bodywork skills on. If it comes out good, keep it on the car; if not, you learn.

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  24. redo32
    Joined: Jul 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,387

    redo32
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    Let's be reasonable, any interesting history was lost with the sandblasting of the patina which uncovered a sloppy restoration of previously cut holes for then in vogue tail lights. If this modification was done at a quality shop like Valley Custom or Sam Barris it would have been leaded and might have some historical value. It was plainly done by a backyard hack that had a welder and a can of bondo. Get over it. That panel might have a couple of spot welds and some rivets or screws holding it in. Easy removal, prime it and hang it on the hall, brag to your friends how much better it looks with the new panel. Any competent builder will tell first to "Restore the body and then do your modification".
     
  25. RiffRaffRoadster
    Joined: Dec 24, 2018
    Posts: 307

    RiffRaffRoadster
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    Even if that backyard hack did the mods in the late 1940’s? I’d like to keep that history intact so the next guy that repaints the car in 30 years can see those welds.


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  26. redo32
    Joined: Jul 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,387

    redo32
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    I like you Riff and I have a noticed a dramatic change in your appreciation of traditional hot rodding from your first posts of wanting to make your car look like Magnuson's, Boyd's roadster (edit. I went back and caught the word..kidding) to now wanting to honor previous craftsmen. If the modifications were done with proper hammer welding and metal finished I would applaud your desire to save it. The fact is after looking at the pictures it is plain to see that the person knew nothing of metal finishing it is warped and it appears that there is burn through and that type of work does not deserve the attention other than to show how it should not be done.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2019
  27. jimgoetz
    Joined: Sep 6, 2013
    Posts: 188

    jimgoetz
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    Here's a picture of my car as it was in 53. Not built by a craftsman but a 17 year old kid and good enough to have been a two page feature in a mag. The other picture is how I found it. Note how the cutouts were made for the 39 taillights. filename-1 (1).jpg DSCN1256.JPG
     
  28. In any reputable shop that panel would have been on the Floor and a replacement one in place simply because it's the best service for the Customer. When the Customer says "hay that looks nice, where's the other one" I would say over there on the scrap pile, you can have it if you want it. Let's be honest Guys, these cars never go backwards. Going forward means spending time and $$$ wisely.
     
  29. jimgoetz
    Joined: Sep 6, 2013
    Posts: 188

    jimgoetz
    Member

    cc
    Well I did replace that panel. I couldn't save it. I was showing what was ok in the early 50's when this car was built. I left the two round spots on the back panel where the straps that held the gas tank were brazed on just for this reason. They also have a little bit of original paint in them. I now have a little magnetic sign back there that says "not fake patina"Maybe I should add another one saying don't do it like this. DSCN1182.JPG
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2019
  30. RiffRaffRoadster
    Joined: Dec 24, 2018
    Posts: 307

    RiffRaffRoadster
    Member

    Kind of the same argument to keep the original front cowl as is with the jagged remnants of the original gas tank they cut out intact. You can only see it/feel it if you look under the dash, but kind of cool its there. Totally hidden from outside.
     
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