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Let's Talk Cyclecars

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Bigcheese327, Dec 4, 2007.

  1. Stretchmobile
    Joined: Oct 29, 2013
    Posts: 108

    Stretchmobile
    Member
    from So Cal

    This is by far the most entertaining thread on the forum. Always something interesting to look at and imagine building it yourself. Thanks to the regular posters. I have no idea where you get all these cool pictures from.
     
  2. fredvv44
    Joined: Dec 11, 2013
    Posts: 445

    fredvv44
    Member

    Doing valve work on one of those is like going to a proctologist for dental work.
     
  3. motoklas
    Joined: Dec 17, 2010
    Posts: 640

    motoklas
    Member
    from Bern, CH

    ...it would be painfull just to watch!
    Zoran
     
  4. Talgil
    Joined: Jan 28, 2013
    Posts: 51

    Talgil
    Member
    from Luxembourg

    001.jpg 001.jpg Does anyone know what this is?
     

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  5. motoklas
    Joined: Dec 17, 2010
    Posts: 640

    motoklas
    Member
    from Bern, CH

    Hello Talgil,

    Quite interesting vehicle! Maybe combination of a few of them?

    Chassis looks made in a style of early quadricycles/voiturettes, with bicycle-tube construction. Front suspension/steering - sliding pillars, rear suspension quite classic (just for the body). Rear axle with differential possibly of some more serious automobile? Rear wheels of some vintage motorcycle? Probably that engine was in that wooden box that could be lower part of the body? Seats and steering wheel or column are missing...

    Maybe, just my imagination, but could be modified unknown original or totally DIY project! Anyway, I would like to Havel one in may garage!

    Ciao, Zoran
    P.S.: Just found more photos and short text on PreWarCar advertisements:
    "Kleines Fahrgestell. Radstand 109cm, Spur vorn 73cm.Spur hinten78cm."
    Meaning: “small chassis, wheel-base 109 cm, track at front 73 cm, track at rear 78 cm
    Price is 1200 Euros.
     

    Attached Files:

  6. Grahamsc
    Joined: May 13, 2014
    Posts: 466

    Grahamsc
    Member
    from Colorado

  7. Ned Ludd
    Joined: May 15, 2009
    Posts: 4,228

    Ned Ludd
    Member

    It looks like it might have been electric: motor lengthwise ahead of the rear axle, and batteries in the box at the front?
     
  8. Talgil
    Joined: Jan 28, 2013
    Posts: 51

    Talgil
    Member
    from Luxembourg

    Thanks Zoran and Ned. All these were exactly my thoughts as well! I hoped someone on this thread would identify it, which would made it easier for me to take the decision to travel over 1200km to have it standing in my garage.
    Second, what would I do with it? Instal an early pre 1905 single cylinder under the seat, a period gearbox and a tiller steering? This would not make it eligible for the London-Brighton! Or instal an electric motor directly on the rear drive? Would be nice and I could drive it all the 11 km of deserted country roads to my work on sunny days, - if I would ever get allowed to do so, as there are no papers with it !
    But it is nice, and I cannot stop thinking about it !!!
     
  9. motoklas
    Joined: Dec 17, 2010
    Posts: 640

    motoklas
    Member
    from Bern, CH

    Hello Ned,
    You must be right: that could be some kind of electric-powered "carette"! Alas, we shall never know who build it, for what use and how it looked originally? Therefore - not any chance to re-created it to its original shape...

    Talquil,

    I like it too - but as above: no chance for London - Brighton rally or any other serious veteran show? It could be good if transferred into replica of antic vehicle if somebody have knowledge and money for that. Would it be worth of it - who knows. In my country Serbia, as in many other European countries, it could be reconstruct, attested and registered as "light quadricycle" and use at roads, under regulations from EU directives. Some Diesel engine or electric-motor of up to 4 Kilo-Watts should be enough and in limits of regulations and standards (moped engine of 50 cc shouldn't be quite in style?).
    Now – next question: what is this on attached photos? I saw it on Swiss Ricardo (the same as E-Bay) without many explanation. It has four-wheel brakes, not-so-bad steering, with passenger seat at front and “driver” standing at rear. No motor/engine or pedals! If I saw it before I bought two MTB for my pedal-powered quadricycle, I should buy it. It was much cheaper then my bicycles – around 300 $$$...

    Ciao, Zoran
     

    Attached Files:

  10. SR100
    Joined: Nov 26, 2013
    Posts: 932

    SR100
    Member

    The lack of cooling vents in that compartment does lean towards an electric. As does the height of the pinon of that worm drive. Given the low yield of batteries 110± years ago, the front box is too small to hold the necessary batteries. It is likely a toolbox, if it is even original to the car. I suspect it is not. It appears it would interfere with the chain steering system.
    If this is a battery electric, the batteries probably surrounded the motor.
    The other clue is the suspension. There isn't much travel in the front suspension and the rear springs only suspend the body. The axle is fixed. Its builder expected relatively smooth roads, only available in cities back then.
     
  11. motoklas
    Joined: Dec 17, 2010
    Posts: 640

    motoklas
    Member
    from Bern, CH

    Hello SR100,
    With each comment, we are closer to solution of this small catch - but, I am not sure if we could ever find exact answer? Probably that this "auto" was some kind of electric-kart, used at industrial plants to pull trailers or some machines? There isn't place enough on this chassis for any serious freight. However, it is strange that driver's seat had such serious suspension (comfortable?) for industrial vehicle?
    Ciao,
    Zoran

     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2014
  12. SR100
    Joined: Nov 26, 2013
    Posts: 932

    SR100
    Member

    I'm pretty sure it is not industrial. The box and the springs are both pinstriped. Unless it was a show display model, who would go to that effort for a industrial tug? After doing some digging, it appears that the front suspension was based on a circa 1898 Decauville, but with the spring moved under the crossmember to facilitate the chain steering. This reinforces my hunch that it is either French or Italian. Looking at the Decauville below, it doesn't appear to have any rear suspension![​IMG]
    It's a real shame that there is no database where we could plug in a few parameters; say French-built, tiller steering, underseat engine, dos-a-dos seating etc, and see a list of likely suspects. I've long thought that the Beaulieu encyclopedia would be a good start for such a project.
     
  13. motoklas
    Joined: Dec 17, 2010
    Posts: 640

    motoklas
    Member
    from Bern, CH

    ... just as illustration of Decauville's suspension-less rear end, a few photos are attached. Some of the French voiturettes had such rear ends, using de-Dion-Bouton engine and transaxel from thier three-wheelers.
    Ciao, Zoran
     

    Attached Files:

  14. Kume
    Joined: Jan 23, 2010
    Posts: 890

    Kume
    Member

    Some pics from a recent trip to Southwards , New Zealand

    American underslung Woods woods .JPG

    woods.a.JPG IMG_4475.JPG
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2014
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  15. Kume
    Joined: Jan 23, 2010
    Posts: 890

    Kume
    Member

    Phenomobile Phenomobile .JPG IMG_4519.JPG IMG_4472.JPG
     
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  16. Kume
    Joined: Jan 23, 2010
    Posts: 890

    Kume
    Member

    smith smith flyer.JPG flyer
     
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  17. Kume
    Joined: Jan 23, 2010
    Posts: 890

    Kume
    Member

    IMG_4455.JPG IMG_4454.JPG IMG_4453.JPG IMG_4450.JPG The usual bubbles & a Bantam
     
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  18. Kume
    Joined: Jan 23, 2010
    Posts: 890

    Kume
    Member

  19. Microcar1
    Joined: Aug 3, 2006
    Posts: 55

    Microcar1
    Member
    from NY

    1914 Dudly Bug at the Petersen.
    ImageUploadedByH.A.M.B.1415580576.706671.jpg ImageUploadedByH.A.M.B.1415580595.505793.jpg
     
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  20. Microcar1
    Joined: Aug 3, 2006
    Posts: 55

    Microcar1
    Member
    from NY

    1922 Peugeot Torpedo Type 161. ImageUploadedByH.A.M.B.1415582562.897933.jpg
     
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  21. Grahamsc
    Joined: May 13, 2014
    Posts: 466

    Grahamsc
    Member
    from Colorado

    You could also buy a smith motorwheel kit , not much different than the drive unit on the Flyer.
    You mounted it on you bike image.jpg
     
  22. rg171352
    Joined: Oct 24, 2007
    Posts: 496

    rg171352
    Member
    from New York

  23. 64 DODGE 440
    Joined: Sep 2, 2006
    Posts: 4,256

    64 DODGE 440
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from so cal

    With the reflection on the windshield it's sort of hard to tell, but the windshield wiper on the right side is a bit of a give away. o_O
     
  24. Kume
    Joined: Jan 23, 2010
    Posts: 890

    Kume
    Member

    RHD
     
  25. rg171352
    Joined: Oct 24, 2007
    Posts: 496

    rg171352
    Member
    from New York

    Wow, you don't see many photos of those.
     
  26. motoklas
    Joined: Dec 17, 2010
    Posts: 640

    motoklas
    Member
    from Bern, CH

    Hello Kume,
    Nice photos of excellent collection! Anyone of them should make me happy to have.
    I will sugets that everybody use option of tumbnails when attach phtos - it would be easier to open this page and photos should be easier to watch.

    Ciao, Zoran
     
  27. Kume
    Joined: Jan 23, 2010
    Posts: 890

    Kume
    Member

    my apologies for the large pics. I appreciate that they are a little clumsy for some. I will in future reduce the size or post them as thumbnails as you suggest
     
  28. motoklas
    Joined: Dec 17, 2010
    Posts: 640

    motoklas
    Member
    from Bern, CH

    ... not any big problem, but it is simpler to use THUMBNAILS option and keep original size: nice to watch them later, or to save them to comouter.
    Again, thank you Kume for wonderful photos!
    Ciao, Zoran
     
  29. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 6,038

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

  30. Kume
    Joined: Jan 23, 2010
    Posts: 890

    Kume
    Member

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