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Jeff Lilly Restorations 54 Bumper Addon Part 1

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by JeffLilly, Sep 4, 2013.

  1. JeffLilly
    Joined: Aug 27, 2013
    Posts: 5

    JeffLilly
    Member
    from Sa Tx

    1. Let's face it most original bumpers from the factory were not shaped that well especially on the fat

    fendered 50's trucks. As seen on this 1954 Ford the ends shut down as if they whacked them off. We will show

    you how to make it fit with a more realistic style in keeping with the body.

    [​IMG]

    2. Another angle shows it even better, As seen the centerline has been found and we hung a plumb bob to keep

    us on track.


    [​IMG]

    3. The first step is a mockup. We use chip board which is available at your local art store. I purchase it in

    bulk from Dick Blick.com for the best pricing per sheet. I personally like to do quick mock ups to save the

    clients time and then look at it through out the day to be sure I like it. I also like to look at it from

    different angles and distances. If all is acceptable after that I go with it .


    [​IMG]

    4. To start the process we will go back about 4 inches or so from the end so we have enough room to make the

    transition smooth and precise.


    [​IMG]

    5. Mani cut it off using a Chicago Pneumatic 861 and then deburred the edge to have a clean starting point.


    [​IMG]

    6. Mani cut some chip board and fit it around the corner to make the transition.


    [​IMG]

    7. Using our mockup as a template we laid out the pieces and transferred them to 16 gauge sheet metal. The

    more precise you can make the template the better your finished parts will come out. We used 16 gauge as the

    bumper is thicker then the average 20 gauge body panel. Remember, good fit, good weld, bad fit, bad weld, the

    choice is up to you. Take the time to do it right and you will be happy with the results.


    [​IMG]

    8. Mani uses a regular sharpie to mark this bumper end as a guide to tweak the edge. On some pieces we use

    fine line sharpies for precise marking and or miko blueing spray while using a carbide tip scribe for a fine

    silver line.


    [​IMG]

    9. Simple tools can be used such as an adjustable wrench to enable a small bend of 1/8th to1/4 inch. This

    makes a nice rounded edge like our bumper top will have.


    [​IMG]

    10. Same goes for the side piece as seen it is coming around as he works it bit by bit until it is formed to

    his liking.


    [​IMG]

    Go to part 2...

    Source:

    Jeff Lilly Restorations
    11125 Fm 1560
    San Antonio, Tx
    78023
    www.jefflilly.com
    210-695-5151
     
  2. JeffLilly
    Joined: Aug 27, 2013
    Posts: 5

    JeffLilly
    Member
    from Sa Tx

    11. You can hammer and dolly it the same way at this point but we use a planishing hammer because we need to

    be maximally efficient for our customers sake. Mani works the edge using a small radius die to take out any

    waves or irregularity’s that the adjustable wrench made while he was tweaking the radius with the adjustable

    wrench.


    [​IMG]

    12. A close up shows how affective it is with this tool as it makes it a snap to roll it to the final shape.


    [​IMG]

    13. The center of the bumper end gets dipped a bit when the edge is being formed so the english wheel will

    smooth and stretch it back out to a consistent shape in keeping with the bumpers radius.


    [​IMG]

    14. She fits pretty good first time around so we are well on our way with the center section. Time to get on

    to the top section.


    [​IMG]

    15. Mani uses a square for a straight edge as he places the top section on the driver side and tack welds it

    in place.


    [​IMG]

    16. As seen both top and bottom corners are level and tacked in place as she is starting to come around. We

    are going from one side of the bumper to the other for photographic purposes but it really does not matter if

    you do the top/ bottom or side pieces first.


    [​IMG]

    17. The center sections that Mani made first are now fitted in place. Being that we want a subtle radius on

    all edges and given the fact that this gauge of metal will expand more then a thinner gauge because of the

    heat level required during welding, we took this in to consideration and left a 1/8th gap for optimum

    results. As seen we have it tack weld in place.


    [​IMG]

    18. On the passenger side we are looking over the bumpers edge to decide where we want to trim it for the

    best look. In addition we are deciding how much we want to add to the top to make it closer to the body for a

    snug fit.


    [​IMG]

    19. Mani made a temple and cut out some metal and has it laid out on top of the bumper so we can fill the

    void. We will then trim it back until there is a ½ inch gap between the body and bumpers edge.


    [​IMG]

    20. After we cut it at the correct angle it is time to add a 3/16th wire to round off the edge.


    [​IMG]

    21. Welded then ground smooth she looks great.


    [​IMG]

    22. In order to keep from seeing the bumper bracket we added a bit of metal to close up the large gap the

    factory had on the splash pan behind the bumper. Time to finish it off.


    [​IMG]

    Go to part 1...

    Source:

    Jeff Lilly Restorations
    11125 Fm 1560
    San Antonio, Tx
    78023
    www.jefflilly.com
    210-695-5151
     
  3. Bugguts
    Joined: Aug 13, 2011
    Posts: 689

    Bugguts
    Member

    Nicely done. Your details and pictures are sure to help someone cleanup their front end.
     
  4. gearhead78
    Joined: Aug 27, 2006
    Posts: 144

    gearhead78
    Member
    from Dallas TX

    I have looked at several of you step my step how to's over the years on your web site. Some of the best stuff on the net.
     

  5. Frankie47
    Joined: Dec 20, 2008
    Posts: 1,768

    Frankie47
    Member
    from omaha ne.

    Nice work.......maybe you could have left your logo out so it didn't feel like an infommercial........
     
  6. Fedman
    Joined: Dec 17, 2005
    Posts: 1,163

    Fedman
    Member

    Thanks for taking the time to post a very good Tech Article.

    As for the "infomercial comment" Please ignore the minority.
     
  7. C-1-PW
    Joined: Jun 11, 2006
    Posts: 357

    C-1-PW
    Member

    Great tech article. Thanks for sharing.

    I'm glad you are posting here, but if your gonna survive you have to wear your big boy pants. Self promotion would never fly, and sometimes you'll get chewed on just because. But with freebies like this, I think you will make friends fast. Keep 'em coming!

    Welcome!
     
  8. roosterslucky
    Joined: Nov 30, 2013
    Posts: 16

    roosterslucky
    Member
    from florida

    Nice one, I have that truck and was looking at that scenario the other day, not really sure how to tackle it. Thanks!
     
  9. motoandy
    Joined: Sep 19, 2007
    Posts: 3,304

    motoandy
    Member
    from MB, SC

    What was the name of your company?

    Nice how to thread by the way.
     
  10. 60 Belair
    Joined: Feb 19, 2006
    Posts: 747

    60 Belair
    Member

    Hey nice work these guys crank out some great stuff.

    Andy
     
  11. Sting Ray
    Joined: Mar 24, 2012
    Posts: 953

    Sting Ray
    Member

    Great tech with pics. I've seen your work over the years, tremendous asset to the HAMB. :cool:
     
  12. Awesome work, I'll look at this for my 56.
    You give great free tech and people bitch because you list your contact info. Thanks for posting this for those of us that appreciate it.
     

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