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how to build a frame jig?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by goldhunter_2, Oct 27, 2012.

  1. goldhunter_2
    Joined: Jan 10, 2010
    Posts: 83

    goldhunter_2
    Member

    Ok the info is probably somewhere on the site and I'm probably just searching for something by the wrong name again so I am just going to ask.


    for those of us who are shoe string budget minded hobbyist that work in our garage or yard (not big shops with fancy tools) what is the best way to build a jig to build a new frame?

    I have been debating weather to use 2x8 channel or build form 10ga plate , but think the plate would be easier to shape to the 1.5 ton chevy truck frame specs if I can come up with some type of JIG ........ I know one of ya'll must have done this before How do you make your jig ? Are there any threads of pictures of the jig build?
     
  2. Best one I ever worked on was just two pieces of H beam on some legs made from 3" well pipe with flanges that bolted to the floor. There were lugs in the floor and you could make it about 3 different widths.

    Oh I haven't tried searching but some of the fellas call them a frame table.
     
  3. I went through this same issue when I started to build my model T roadster. If you search the HAMB and Google under frame table and you will find many varieties. I finally built mine out of 3 1/2 by 3/16 wall square tubing. I used the table to mount the T frame and then mounted the T body on the frame to do all the metal work and now I am modifying a model A frame. Here's couple pics...
     

    Attached Files:

    bct likes this.
  4. Blind Elwood
    Joined: Jul 1, 2010
    Posts: 229

    Blind Elwood
    Member


  5. ed_v
    Joined: Jun 2, 2008
    Posts: 242

    ed_v
    Member
    from Kentucky

  6. goldhunter_2
    Joined: Jan 10, 2010
    Posts: 83

    goldhunter_2
    Member

    porknbeaner,
    I have been searching frame table and that seems to be the proper name or correct tool but I don't think that is what I was thing about . I swear I have seen some built a wooden Jig to build a frame for plate material .


    Blind Elwood,
    that's a awesome build , but that table probably would not even fit inside my garage and the $1800:eek: in materials cost just seems counter productive for a one time use type thing that basically would get junked after I build my frame
     
  7. MrMike
    Joined: May 21, 2010
    Posts: 139

    MrMike
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    If I understand what you want is a JIG to fabricate frame rails on? check the tech section I believe there is one there on building 32 frame rails?
     
  8. goldhunter_2
    Joined: Jan 10, 2010
    Posts: 83

    goldhunter_2
    Member

    yes want to fabricate a new frame , I'll check there thanks
     
  9. 296 V8
    Joined: Sep 17, 2003
    Posts: 4,666

    296 V8
    BANNED
    from Nor~Cal

    I work w big steel everyday
    That being said I would never build a frame jig out of channel - angle - I beam or H beam.
    Only tubing is strait and true enough for that job.
     
  10. goldhunter_2
    Joined: Jan 10, 2010
    Posts: 83

    goldhunter_2
    Member

    MrMike,
    that's the thread I was thinking of thanks
     
  11. Cyclone
    Joined: Mar 31, 2006
    Posts: 223

    Cyclone
    Member
    from Sonoma, CA

    Here's mine, free-to-me structual unequal channel from a dumpster.
    Pay no attention to the non-traditional stuff.
    ==========================================
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  12. gearheadbill
    Joined: Oct 11, 2002
    Posts: 1,313

    gearheadbill
    Member

    a man who knows his steel.
     
  13. goldhunter_2
    Joined: Jan 10, 2010
    Posts: 83

    goldhunter_2
    Member

    if I only had dumpster like that around here ...lol
     
  14. willys1
    Joined: Oct 31, 2012
    Posts: 1,021

    willys1
    Member
    from South Ga

    Well put and correct sir!
    I built mine out of 12 in I beam >>>only because I used square TUBING on the adjustable crossmembers where the chassis sits. :cool:
     
  15. 296 V8
    Joined: Sep 17, 2003
    Posts: 4,666

    296 V8
    BANNED
    from Nor~Cal

    Sure that’s perfect.
    The thing I always find w I beams is … one side is never square with the other.
    The stuff is fine for just working off one of the flat sides.
     
  16. Don's Hot Rods
    Joined: Oct 7, 2005
    Posts: 8,319

    Don's Hot Rods
    Member
    from florida

    We only build one frame every year or two, so we really didn't want a huge frame table taking up valuable shop space. Ours is made from some C channel that we can stand on it's side and shove against a wall when not in use. It would be nice to have legs on it so it would be at a better working height, but for our purposes it is fine.

    We have been kicking around picking up a long piece of big I beam and making adjustable arms off of that, but we have just never gotten around to it.

    Don

    [​IMG]

    One thing I do like about ours is that it can be flipped on it's side to do horizontal welds on the sides of the frame, simply by picking it up with the gantry.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2012
  17. pbr40
    Joined: Aug 10, 2008
    Posts: 833

    pbr40
    Member
    from NW Indiana

    Don that's great insight for this thread. Don't get me wrong that table that the link went to is amazing but must of us don't have the room or the use for something that big. The pic of ours is really what is usable and practical for us who are dedicated hobbyist! Thanks for posting!!!
     
  18. pitman
    Joined: May 14, 2006
    Posts: 5,151

    pitman

    Don,
    Just curious, did you notch the rear crossmember, where the driveshaft went thru?
    Or did it run above the crossmember? Nice frame work there.
     
  19. oj
    Joined: Jul 27, 2008
    Posts: 6,313

    oj
    Member

    I made mine from 2X4 3/16ths wall? and has 1" allthread adjusters for the legs. The big thing about the jig is taht it has to be as simple as possible, then you tack weld the special 'features' to it for particular tasks.
     
  20. Don's Hot Rods
    Joined: Oct 7, 2005
    Posts: 8,319

    Don's Hot Rods
    Member
    from florida

    Thanks Pitman. Yes, the crossmember is notched so the driveshaft can run above it.

    Don

    [​IMG]
     
  21. goldhunter_2
    Joined: Jan 10, 2010
    Posts: 83

    goldhunter_2
    Member

  22. pitman
    Joined: May 14, 2006
    Posts: 5,151

    pitman

    Work like this and some of Casny's, ElPolako, Sibley, Littleman...would sure be the pics to show the Dutch legis's about the knowlege base and devotion to the craft. Functional art this is.
     
  23. 53sled
    Joined: Jul 5, 2005
    Posts: 5,818

    53sled
    Member
    from KCMO

    It can be done with 2x4 studs and mdf or good plywood. That's how many locost seven replica frames begin, mine is within 1/16" flat and true. you can drill a hole in the mdf and bolt anchors down, then use long all thread to go left/right and start tack welding.

    It doesn't have to be complicated, check this out.
    http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=299105
     
  24. southern thunder
    Joined: Mar 14, 2012
    Posts: 226

    southern thunder
    Member

    years ago in one of the car magazines there was an article by Art Morrison on how to build a frame jig out of 4x4s,2x4s, and 3/4 plywood, to put one of his frame,rollcage, kits together. a buddy built one and it turned out pretty nice for home built, did a good job of holding everything square, etc. If somebody has that old magazine with the article, may be helpful. I'm thinking it was around late 70s, to mid 80s.
     
  25. Don's Hot Rods
    Joined: Oct 7, 2005
    Posts: 8,319

    Don's Hot Rods
    Member
    from florida

    Is the wood strong enough to keep the metal from pulling out of shape from welding ? It is amazing how steel will distort unless really clamped down tight.

    Don
     
  26. Rickybop
    Joined: May 23, 2008
    Posts: 7,977

    Rickybop
    Member
    from Michigan

    How about a big truck frame for the main structure? I imagine one could be had for not much $.
     
  27. southern thunder
    Joined: Mar 14, 2012
    Posts: 226

    southern thunder
    Member

    as well as I can remember, it was used to keep everything square, and the joints were just tac welded while in the jig., I can't remember what the article said, but I'm sure it wasn't meant to be fully welded in the jig, due to setting the jig on fire.
     
  28. 53sled
    Joined: Jul 5, 2005
    Posts: 5,818

    53sled
    Member
    from KCMO

    you can weld a little here, a little there and go slow if you are concerned about warping. less time total than trying to make a perfect, flat, heavy steel frame table.
     
    Kona Cruisers likes this.
  29. goldhunter_2
    Joined: Jan 10, 2010
    Posts: 83

    goldhunter_2
    Member

    ya'll need to practice welding thin sheet aluminum for boat hulls after you get the hang of that you don't give steel warping a second thought ....lol
     
  30. kennkat
    Joined: Aug 25, 2011
    Posts: 1,383

    kennkat
    Member

    As a matter of fact I am eyeballing a set of Alloy frame rails right now!!!
    I think they will make a rigid, light jig... Straight no bends.. so long I can cut to length, riveted X-members, etc... Now the haggle over price begins...Lol:):):)
     

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