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How are guys sealing inner wheel wells to body?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Crazy Legs, Feb 7, 2014.

  1. Crazy Legs
    Joined: Sep 3, 2008
    Posts: 266

    Crazy Legs
    Member

    Hey everyone,
    I'm finishing up the major interior sheet metal work on my 54 and I need to know what you guys are using to attach and seal inner wheel wells or wheel tubs etc to the insides of 1/4 panels. Glue, seam sealer, windshield glue, welding, etc?

    A local body man suggested LORD 108B super strong panel automotive 2 part epoxy glue so I bought some, he said a bomb wouldn't break that metal bond once cured but my only concern is what happens when the sun hits the side of the 1/4 panel and gets hot? Does it distort the 1/4 so you can see exactly where the inner wheel well is? If so that would be obviously bad.......

    Welding would be the best idea but it'll ruin the paint (no biggie actually) but I'm worried about distorting the 1/4 panel and creating waves that you will see.......

    I've got some Eastwood seam sealer but I figured I'd ask your guys opinion before I hate myself this summer :)

    Thanks!
     
  2. We've been struggling with this as well. If we mate them the way it was originally, the results will be the same...A narrow pinch area that collects water and promotes rust through. Its original, but a bad system.
    We've decided to bring the fenderwells straight out to within about 1/8 inch of the body panel, and seal them with a gasket. I think it'll work much better.
     
  3. Crazy Legs
    Joined: Sep 3, 2008
    Posts: 266

    Crazy Legs
    Member

    yeah I understand the original concept of the inner wheel well wrapping clear around and attaching back to the fender skirt lip would be the best idea but I made these tubs capable of housing up to 12" wide tires for the Salina KKOA street drags and this won't work very well even though 90% of the time it'll have the wide white 205/75/15's on it & I also agree with Chaz's comment as well.

    I do agree on the rubber seal or flexible seam sealer etc. would the super flexible black windshield weatherstrip caulking in the tube be a good idea?

    Since the latest pics in my build thread, the tubs extend over to the inside of the body and have 1/2" long tabs that were going to be used to help attach or seal the tub to the body.

    Thanks :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2014
    Straightpipes likes this.
  4. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 46,907

    squirrel
    Member

    Stick your head up into the wheelwell, and weld in a panel dropping down from the edge of the tub, to the edge of the wheel opening in the quarter panel. Pretty much identical to the panel that fills the other side of the wheel tub to the trunk floor.
     

  5. Crazy Legs
    Joined: Sep 3, 2008
    Posts: 266

    Crazy Legs
    Member

    Yep I understand what you guys are saying.

    I hope to get this sealed up good enough i can drive in the rain and not have to worry about anything getting wet. So far everything is that good of a fit I know it will seal except for this area.

    Thanks again.
     
  6. i always treat that area by; turning my spray gun to "garden hose" setting and blowing the primer and paint, [a good use for any left over paint] into the cavity until, it:), me:D, and the floor:eek: are are thoroughly covered.
     
  7. Nomadness
    Joined: Oct 26, 2007
    Posts: 462

    Nomadness
    Member

  8. Frankenstein57
    Joined: Jun 16, 2010
    Posts: 75

    Frankenstein57
    Member

    My buddy has a fine 64 Chevy 2 that is tubbed, he made the mistake of welding the inner wheel well metal to the quarter. It pretty much put the brakes on the whole project, really messed up his quarter panels. Mark
     
  9. 1971BB427
    Joined: Mar 6, 2010
    Posts: 5,895

    1971BB427
    Member
    from Oregon

    I weld them in, then hit the edges and seams with seam sealer to keep the elements out.
     
  10. VOODOO ROD & CUSTOM
    Joined: Dec 27, 2009
    Posts: 1,230

    VOODOO ROD & CUSTOM
    Member

    I use either Windshield Urethane or Automotive Urethane Caulk (ie. Tigerseal,etc...)
    I understand what you are trying to do since I've done this on several builds.
    OH, and Yes; I have been a Bodyman for 36 years now.

    Good Luck,
    VR&C.
     
  11. pimpin paint
    Joined: May 31, 2005
    Posts: 4,939

    pimpin paint
    Member
    from so cal

    Hey,

    Something to keep in mind is that Ford welded them solid for a really good reason!;) We're talking 'bout a 3500# automobile on a sixty year old conventional frame. If the quarterpanel wheelhouses are not ridgid to the body, that area will become a flex point on a quarter of that length!:(
     
  12. 325w
    Joined: Feb 18, 2008
    Posts: 5,378

    325w
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from texas

    They repop some soft foam seals for the tri 5's foam pad with a slit down the center.
     
  13. texasred
    Joined: Dec 3, 2008
    Posts: 1,078

    texasred
    Member
    from Houston

    if you are going to caulk it use Dow 795, it's a construction sealant that stays flexible you can get it from any glass shop or glazing supply store
     
  14. merc-o-madness
    Joined: Aug 23, 2004
    Posts: 1,544

    merc-o-madness
    Member

    i used some black stuff
     
  15. summersshow
    Joined: Mar 3, 2013
    Posts: 899

    summersshow
    Member
    from NC

    That panel adhesive does work great. IT WILL NOT WARP YOUR QUARTER! Similar stuff is used on new BMWs where the structure is steel and the body is aluminium.... Its just like welding the panels together without the heat... READ INSTRUCTIONS CAREFULLY... o and following them tends to help too. haha
     
  16. Crazy Legs
    Joined: Sep 3, 2008
    Posts: 266

    Crazy Legs
    Member

    wow great info and pics, thanks again guys :)
     
  17. fourtogo
    Joined: Jan 4, 2011
    Posts: 93

    fourtogo
    Member
    from long beach

  18. racer_dave
    Joined: Nov 16, 2012
    Posts: 205

    racer_dave
    Member

    This probably won't be real popular, but I think the LORD adhesive would hold up great. In the sign business we use it to make those nice seamless signs out in front of the banks/malls. They routinely were out in 120* direct sun in Florida and frozen over to -20 in Michigan, and never seperated. We had signs hit by cars that bent the frames of the signs, but the panels stayed bonded. I've used it to bond interior panels to the body on my racecars because then I don't have tons of pop rivets showing on the outer body. Even after backing it into the wall @ 110mph it didn't de-bond.

    I think it would work great, especially if he was worried about the paint on the outside of the panel. Follow the directions exactly so the mix is right, and don't clamp so tightly that you squeeze all the adhesive out, otherwise there's nothing left to bond the two surfaces. JMHO.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2014
  19. Crazy Legs
    Joined: Sep 3, 2008
    Posts: 266

    Crazy Legs
    Member

    Racer Dave,
    I've heard nothing but good things about the LORD stuff and after reading all about it, watching the videos, reviews and knowing that FORD, Chrysler, & GM use it on body panels, doors etc we are going to end up doing exactly what you said, I've got LORD 108b and we've eliminated all the pressure the tub pushing out on the quarter panel so we figure that if there is no pressure out on it you should never see it, TBD though :)

    I did notice it says to use it on bare metal no primer correct?
     
  20. racer_dave
    Joined: Nov 16, 2012
    Posts: 205

    racer_dave
    Member

    Yes, bare metal only. Make sure it has some tooth to it too. 36 grit-ish. I've bonded steel to steel, steel to aluminum, alum to fiberglass... it just has to be to the structural surface, not the paint, primer etc...
     
  21. Crazy Legs
    Joined: Sep 3, 2008
    Posts: 266

    Crazy Legs
    Member

  22. 3M Panel bond #08115 adhesive is a really good product that's hard to beat. You can bond just about anything you desire. It was actually invented too work on Audi's,bonding the steel door frame to aluminum outer skin. It also works on plastics,fiberglass and steel to steel. I've actually seen a full size Chevy roof removed and replaced using this adhesive,so I'm sure it will work on your wheelhouses with no problem. It has about a 90 minute working time and it dries overnight.The biggest drawback is the cost and the special applicator. It's a great addition and problem solver that no shop should be without.
     
  23. joeycarpunk
    Joined: Jun 21, 2004
    Posts: 4,443

    joeycarpunk
    Member
    from MN,USA

    I used PL 200, Liquid Nails type stuff to seal welded inner seams. Comes in caulking tubes and inexpensive, paints up well and doesn't come off prepped surface.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2014
  24. theHIGHLANDER
    Joined: Jun 3, 2005
    Posts: 8,063

    theHIGHLANDER
    Member

    I'll second the use of windshield sealant. I use the fast set stuff and run it through a regular caulking gun. I used to do a lot of tubbed cars and the racers never smoked the interiors and none of them came loose after hundreds of 1/4mi passes. A good fit is the 1st defense, 2nd would be surface prep either with grinding or a nice acid etch. A total commitment is required as in plan to seal them in the day they're installed. As far as structural integrity is concerned, modern windshields and back lights are structural parts of the cars. Run a full length bead and you won't be getting them out, perhaps ever! If you've spot welded the lips and are concerned with a seal afterward there's self leveling seam sealer that's used in drip rails and such. For corrosion a coat of weld-thru primer goes a long way too. Last and perhaps least for corrosion prevention on etched metal, squirt some POR-15 into the seam area. You'll see it run out of the gaps for the full length of the joint and will most likely be there for the rest of your life. It's also a good smoke seal in a racer and fills in those paper thin gaps in the OEM rear wheel wells.
     
  25. Nomadness
    Joined: Oct 26, 2007
    Posts: 462

    Nomadness
    Member

    Silaprene, Adhesive, Dries Fast, Paintable, A high strength adhesive/sealant that provides a permanently elastic bond. Specifically designed for the fabrication and repair of trailers ...
     

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