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Hot Rod Reunion Photos **WARNING – Some of these may be considered "artsy".

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by SpnkyMcGee, Nov 1, 2011.

  1. Da Flash
    Joined: Mar 27, 2008
    Posts: 125

    Da Flash
    Member

    Damn,
    Next time I go to an event, I am going to follow you around!!! Only have one film camera left, a $200 Canon with its own belt holster..
    Nice Stuff

    Da Flash
     
  2. Mr48chev
    Joined: Dec 28, 2007
    Posts: 27,540

    Mr48chev
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Great photos and That kind of "artsy" you can show us every day and we won't get tired of it. The film adds a depth and quality to it that you don't find in digital photos.
     
  3. greg ducato
    Joined: Oct 19, 2011
    Posts: 29

    greg ducato
    Member

    Excellence, really enjoyed the post
     
  4. hotrd32
    Joined: May 16, 2007
    Posts: 3,503

    hotrd32
    Member
    from WA

    Wow haven't seen work from a Twin Lens camera in a LONG time...great stuff!....like the shot of Terry's case full of Stewart Warners.........etc
     
  5. Super cool shots - artsy, well, I don't know - cool photography, yes! Thanks for sharing ....
     
  6. couverkid
    Joined: Mar 30, 2007
    Posts: 1,125

    couverkid
    Member

    Love it. Thanks
     
  7. Ryan
    Joined: Jan 2, 1995
    Posts: 19,254

    Ryan
    ADMINISTRATOR
    from Austin, TX
    Staff Member

    Really great stuff. Love the desaturated look.
     
  8. cool37
    Joined: Jan 20, 2009
    Posts: 1,861

    cool37
    Member
    from SoCal

    They look great!
     
  9. Model A John
    Joined: Apr 24, 2008
    Posts: 1,766

    Model A John
    Member
    from wichita ks

  10. You can find TLR's all day on the "bay" and probably Craigslist as well. Most people aren't willing to go through the hassle any more of shooting with these and medium format film adds one more level of complexity. Me, I love it.

    Thanks Tman. I do love film. Next year I'm thinking of doing more formal shots of individual cars with a large format (4x5) 1948 view camera. Now THOSE will be beautiful.

    I may have a couple more after I go through and process everything.

    Everybody and their mother was photographing "Big John" and where it was at the time I shot this it just wasn't conducive to any better shots IMHO. Also, my budget for film and processing was somewhat limited this year so I was a little more careful in the number of shots that I made.

    Thanks Jeff. High praise indeed coming from you.

    I love my old cameras. I also have a Yashica D TLR that I shoot with as well as a Nikon F, Canon III, Pentax 67 and Graflex Speed Graphic. I have been eyeballing a Mamiya C3 as I love the interchangeable lens functionality.
     
  11. Just get out and shoot. This was a $125 purchase. It's not how much you spend, it's how much you're willing to work for it. :)
     
  12. Jobe
    Joined: Oct 19, 2004
    Posts: 1,248

    Jobe
    Member
    from Austin, Tx

  13. Hmmmmm, a book would be cool. Someday after I compile a lot more perhaps. I'm pretty picky. Besides, it will be hard to follow the stuff that Church has been doing for a while now. :)
     
  14. Gabriel Howard
    Joined: Jan 2, 2009
    Posts: 264

    Gabriel Howard
    Member
    from OKC
    1. Okie Hambers

  15. JeffreyJames
    Joined: Jun 13, 2007
    Posts: 16,612

    JeffreyJames
    Member
    from SUGAR CITY

    Some of the best pics I've seen on the HAMB. Incredible.

    Love this one...
    [​IMG]
     
  16. 49ratfink
    Joined: Feb 8, 2004
    Posts: 17,855

    49ratfink
    Member
    from California

    cool shots!!.
     
  17. metal man
    Joined: Dec 4, 2005
    Posts: 2,949

    metal man
    Member

    Some of those would make great posters. Thanks for your trouble.Right click, save!
     
  18. cederholm
    Joined: May 6, 2006
    Posts: 1,621

    cederholm
    Member

    Wonderful photography. Thanks for sharing! Let's here the anti-artsy crowd say something negative about these!

    ~ Carl
     
  19. Oh the humanity, anything but artsy. :rolleyes:

    Like the coverage.

    hey the isky mill is that eds flatty? Do you have any more shots of it and or the car?
     
  20. Mazooma1
    Joined: Jun 5, 2007
    Posts: 13,598

    Mazooma1
    Member

    Hey, nice going to have the patience to use film. The days of immediate gratification were something that we older guys didn't know therefore didn't expect.
    With film you have to buy the film, drag it to car shows or the drags and then having to actually set the lens, either with a light meter, or for us penniless guy, we had to use our wits...then take the film in to get processed and then you.........wait. Sometimes up to a week, you'd wait.
    My paper route money many times didn't provide me with enough money to get prints made, so I'd get back just a roll of negatives.
    Talk about frustrating.
    Then try to find the good shot and take the negatives back in to get a handful of of 3" X 3" prints made, and then.........wait some more.
    Sometimes I wouldn't see a print until two weeks after an event.
    But, like I said, we didn't know any different.

    Another frustrating part of the days of film was that we (and you) had to dole out your shots. You have to ration your film because you don't have the unlimited shots that we have today with cameras that hold hundreds or even thousands of shots.
    I can't tell you how many times I'd have to walk by Don Garlit's car or the "Ala Kart" or not get that shot of Tommy Ivo getting ready to be push started at Lions in 1963....all because I was "saving" some film for "something terrific". Ugh....man, would I like to go back in time...


    So...good for you, for exercising a degree of patience to eek out a style of quality that is becoming rarer by the day.

    Here, on the left, is my trusty Graflex 120 film, 2 1/4" inch from the 1950's that Dad gave me when I was 7, in 1958. The leatherette case has long since rotted off, but she still works. A Graflex was considered a "poor man's" Rolliflex, but she sure captured images that are, today, priceless.

    So, again...nice going to you. And yes, that is traditional.
    And the virtue of "patience" is traditional, too. A virtue that is somewhat lost in today's world. Maybe that's why we are more "short-tempered" today. Many of us never learned "patience".

    [​IMG]
     
  21. damagedduck
    Joined: Jun 16, 2011
    Posts: 2,342

    damagedduck
    Member
    from Greeley Co

    blood great photos!
    i burn up maybe 3-4 rolls of B&W every year!
     
  22. Mazooma1
    Joined: Jun 5, 2007
    Posts: 13,598

    Mazooma1
    Member

    so, just curious:
    A. did you scan the negs or the prints to put them on the HAMB
    B. what sort of manipulation was done on your computer to get them to look like this, any (?), or a certain program? Any specific software?
    C. all shot in color? or did you shoot some B&W film, too?
    D. what kind of film, ASA?
     
  23. richie rebel
    Joined: Oct 8, 2007
    Posts: 1,184

    richie rebel
    Member

    very nice indeed,thanks for sharing
     
  24. 47 ford
    Joined: Oct 15, 2007
    Posts: 227

    47 ford
    Member

    These are very well done, thanks for posting.
     
  25. Very artsy! I liked them all.
     
  26. a. I don't have processing capabilities at home at this point so I have a pro lab that does the base processing and then scans a medium resolution image of the negatives.

    b. As I have been a fan of the ultimate darkroom wizard, Ansel Adams, since I saw his first images I have worked to create a vision of how I want my final images to look and feel. Images are imported into Lightroom and very basic adjustments are made. From there I take them into Photoshop and do exactly like we used to do in the darkroom days with dodging, burning and such. I don't use filters or photoshop trickery. If you can tell that any photoshop work has been done then I believe that it is too much photoshop. The original image is 99% of my foundation so I am really careful of exposure, light and composition in camera prior to taking the shot. It is the latitude and capabilities of medium format film, the amazing Zeiss lens and attention to details that I hope make my images special.

    c/d. These are all shot on Kodak Portra 120 film. Some were on 400 speed and the others were 160 asa. There are very few places that can process black and white film to the standard that I expect or are simply outside of my current budget so I shot color and did my own conversions based on composition, detail and density.

    Bonus. This is the camera that these images were created with:

    [​IMG]
    IKOFLEX_IIa_1 by ScottPhoto.co, on Flickr

    Hope that helps. :D
     
  27. 1940Willys
    Joined: Feb 3, 2011
    Posts: 486

    1940Willys
    Member

  28. Slim Pickens
    Joined: Dec 15, 2008
    Posts: 3,342

    Slim Pickens
    Member

    BAD ASS. Thanks Tim. Great work. Thanks for sharing. Love your NYC shots on your site.
    Slim
     
  29. Original57
    Joined: May 5, 2010
    Posts: 159

    Original57
    Member

    Artsy shmartsy! They're some fantastic photos there fella! The b&w's are my favourite. Thanks for posting. :)

    Brad
     

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