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home made tools and equipment...

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by kustombuilder, Jan 16, 2008.

  1. onemintcaddy
    Joined: Feb 7, 2007
    Posts: 376

    onemintcaddy
    Member

    Thats a Kick ass E-Wheel, I would like to see how you did that. I was looking at that over at metal meet but there was no story,,,, You have any better photos of it?
     
  2. Dyce
    Joined: Sep 12, 2006
    Posts: 1,789

    Dyce
    Member

    It's not my wheel. I just liked the adjuster so I'd throw a picture on. It's on www.metalmeet.com > Join up and ask John, the guy that built it. He'd answer any questions and add pictures. He's a good guy.
    Jeff
     
  3. Dyce
    Joined: Sep 12, 2006
    Posts: 1,789

    Dyce
    Member

    I keep forgetting they have that lockdown going on too.
    Jeff
     
  4. My Uncle just sent me pics of his Helve Hammer.

    ALLSHOPS.ORG
     
  5. onemintcaddy
    Joined: Feb 7, 2007
    Posts: 376

    onemintcaddy
    Member

    That looks alot simpler than this one. KISS,,,,,,,
     

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  6. Yes,simple is good.
     
  7. leon renaud
    Joined: Nov 12, 2005
    Posts: 1,933

    leon renaud
    Member
    from N.E. Ct.

    This unit looks to be running an industrial sewing machine motor.For those that don't know what I mean, This is a 1hp clutch activated variable speed motor not that little tiny thing you see on the machines in your local sewing center.Think Drill press or Table saw size 1HP.When we first turn on the wifes machine the lights dim till the motor comes up to full speed!I'm planning on using this type motor on a couple tools I'm building.The nice part is along with the Hammering you don't have to deal with listening to a compressor and air drill running constantly.it is also more energy efficient than running the compressor to run the air tool
     
  8. Yes,the sewing machine clutch motors are very nice.
    And reliable.

    The motor runs continuously,when you activate the clutch lever,
    the pulley on the motor spins.Release the lever,the pulley stops.

    If you mount the motor closer to the front,with the clutch arm
    on the bottom,you don't need a complicated linkage.
     
  9. One problem is it can be hard to find scrap metal to use now days. Scrap prices are up, trash collection places (my county) won't allow dumpster diving, the metal collection one with good stuff, but all of them. Everyone is afraid of getting sued.

    I used to bring scrap, pipe, angle and other metals when I worked where we had things lone ago...

    I saw shelf's and other stuff in the metal dumpster. If I could get stuff at them, I would be somewhere every week looking...

    I have found somethings at garage sale. Depression age people never threw anything away. And they would make things out of stuff that would make a O.S.H.A. inspector have a heart attack.:D

    Papa
     
  10. nexxussian
    Joined: Mar 14, 2007
    Posts: 3,231

    nexxussian
    Member

    Hey Papa G, you might try the Salvation Army. The one here will throw the bed frames away if they are not complete or are damaged in any way. The local trash company won't let them put them in the dumpster, so maybe that's an option? Bed frame steel is suprisingly good, maybe not good enough for a helve hammer, but it's handy to have around.
     


  11. The "trick" is in NOT asking.
     
  12. I_be_moose
    Joined: Aug 29, 2004
    Posts: 673

    I_be_moose
    Member

    Here are a few of my garage mage goodies. My E-Wheel, Planinhing Hammer frame, Tuck fork made ona visit to HemiRamblers place, and some forming stakes made from an old bent i-beam..........
     

    Attached Files:

    Tin Can and Dieselcatfish like this.
  13. GizmoJoe
    Joined: Jul 18, 2007
    Posts: 1,291

    GizmoJoe
    Member

    Could you explain what a "tuck fork" is? Other than a place in VA....
    Thanks.
     
  14. You use it to twist the sheet metal to start a compound curve.
     
  15. I_be_moose
    Joined: Aug 29, 2004
    Posts: 673

    I_be_moose
    Member

  16. Slide
    Joined: May 11, 2004
    Posts: 3,026

    Slide
    Member

  17. GizmoJoe
    Joined: Jul 18, 2007
    Posts: 1,291

    GizmoJoe
    Member

    Excellent! Thanks guys.
    Guess I'll have to build one of those and practice.
    I also see a "tuck puck" on youtube. Looks interesting.
     
  18. RatBone
    Joined: Sep 15, 2006
    Posts: 660

    RatBone
    Member

    Oxy/Acy cart from lawn mower!

    I need a xart for my bottles so I looked in the backyard junk for metal and had an old rusted lawn mower Ive been meaning to dump. Well first I was just going to use the wheels but the handle worked great also. I used althread with fuel hose on it for the bottles to rest against. I will replace the bungee with chain when I go to lowes. The wheels are still adjustable and most of it was free!

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  19. Black Primer
    Joined: Oct 1, 2007
    Posts: 967

    Black Primer
    Member

    Sweeet, Ratbone, Looks like you went with the adjustable ride height suspension too!
     
  20. turbocat49
    Joined: May 22, 2002
    Posts: 25

    turbocat49
    Member

    Yeah that would be fanfunkintastic!!
     
  21. Bib Overalls
    Joined: Aug 3, 2001
    Posts: 4,064

    Bib Overalls
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Here is a tool that needs to go in the same box with Dreadman's banjo pinion puller (Post #51 above).

    I simply welded a cheap Asian made 1/2" drive socket to the end of a six spline coupler. With this tool and a large adjustable wrench you can easily remove the two large nuts that hold the pinion to the bearings.

    I have not advanced to the point where I can put one together. But, from what I can tell, this tool should be useful going the other way as well.

    As for the wine bottle corks, I have no idea where they came from. This is a HAMB household and we don't drink that woosy stuff.
     

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  22. TxRat
    Joined: Dec 22, 2004
    Posts: 1,412

    TxRat
    Member

    does anyone have a source for the disc back for the sander. it is also called a "Platen"

    I cant source one
     
  23. CURIOUS RASH
    Joined: Jun 2, 2002
    Posts: 9,635

    CURIOUS RASH
    Classified's Moderator

    My need for the tool became greater than my want to build one. I gave up on finding the disk. There was one on Ebay but the shipping was high.

    I started pricing the motor, trying to find a disk and priced the other stuff needed and gave up and ordered a sander from Grizzly tools...

    Was just getting ready to post. Sorry it goes against the spirit of the post but I did modify it slightly and got semi creative for a base...

    Turns out the one they sell now is marginally better than HF's. I should have held out and bought a Delta for about 60. more. Live and learn. I made a stand for it out of one of those OLD sewing machine bases that people love to make tables out of. Bolted (countersunk) a slab of 3/8 steel to the top of it and bolted this bitch to that slab. Replaced all the hardware in the grinder with grade 8 and it works really well. I added a hunk of Aluminum to the guide to make it actually useful. It would never last in a production environment but since I rarely produce anything it should be fine for me. :D

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  24. CURIOUS RASH
    Joined: Jun 2, 2002
    Posts: 9,635

    CURIOUS RASH
    Classified's Moderator

    DANG! Just looking at the middle pic I see my bottle of Loc-Tite!!!

    I've been looking for that everywhere!

    I'm gonna go take pictures of eveyt nook and cranny out there. Maybe I'll find all my missing stuff!:D
     
  25. Wow... Never thought of taking pictures of my tools, but I have a series of custom dollies that I've made. One is made from a section of an old leaf spring.

    Another one I have is an old stump with a "kidney shape" ground out of it for hammering various shapes and contours.

    I didnt make any of these up myself, but actually took the idea from the resto shop I used to work in as a kid. I learned alot from that place...
     
  26. CURIOUS RASH
    Joined: Jun 2, 2002
    Posts: 9,635

    CURIOUS RASH
    Classified's Moderator

    I'd like to see pics...

    59 Plymouth custom huh? :D
     
  27. CURIOUS RASH
    Joined: Jun 2, 2002
    Posts: 9,635

    CURIOUS RASH
    Classified's Moderator

    Oh! SNAP!

    I may have a title around here for that thing...
     
  28. Gleeser
    Joined: Oct 17, 2005
    Posts: 465

    Gleeser
    Member
    from Taylor, MO


    Dude.... that is SICK!! I now know what I'm doing tomorrow. I've been meaning to build a hand planishing stand but hadn't got around to it yet. That is so damn cool I HAVE to make one now.
     
  29. Search on Allshops.org

    I think Pat Groover and John Glover did a serious post on Tuck Shrinking.
     
  30. rodknocker
    Joined: Jan 31, 2006
    Posts: 2,267

    rodknocker

    Here's an elcheapo trim tool I made.First I borrowed a coworkers snap-on trim tool,to make mine similiar.I had one of those $1 screwdrivers, heated up the end cherry red,pounded it flat, put a couple of bends into it,drilled a hole,ground it out a little.Works just as good as the snap-on tool.
     

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