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Technical Gasless welding

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by dkWayfarer50, Dec 17, 2014.

  1. dkWayfarer50
    Joined: Aug 18, 2014
    Posts: 185

    dkWayfarer50
    Member
    from Denmark

    Hi.

    Have any of you guys tryed welding with these mig/mag welders with no gasbottle??? Is it okay for a hobby garage or is it worthless??

    Regards

    Andreas from Denmark
     
  2. If you just want to stick things together, you can go gasless. But if you actually want the welds to look decent/good, you need gas.
     
    stillrunners likes this.
  3. fsae0607
    Joined: Apr 3, 2012
    Posts: 871

    fsae0607
    Member

    Agreed. I've fixed my clutch pedal shaft/bracket and did my exhaust with a flux core wire feed welder. The welds are butt-ugly, but solid.
     
  4. David Chandler
    Joined: Jan 27, 2007
    Posts: 1,101

    David Chandler
    Member

    Flux core in a Mig can work. It takes a bit of practice like anything else new. But going to that from a "stick" arc welder made it look easier that it probably would if you never welded before.
     

  5. Flux core is a fine weld and pretty if you practice.
    The polarity is opposite so it welds hotter and digs deeper than mig( with gas) so that makes a small flux core welder better for things heavier than sheet metal. It also makes sheet metal welding a challenge but it's doable. Flux core makes a lot of smoke & a lot of splatter.
    Some of them can be easily upgraded to add gas.
     
    stillrunners likes this.
  6. Hnstray
    Joined: Aug 23, 2009
    Posts: 12,047

    Hnstray
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Quincy, IL

    Strictly speaking, it isn't 'gasless'. The core of flux in the wire burns and forms a gas
    shield. It just doesn't do it as well and uniformly as a gas shielded wire core welding unit.

    It's not for nothing the welding companies make the low priced units to be easily converted
    to the full gas shield system.

    Ray
     
  7. 73RR
    Joined: Jan 29, 2007
    Posts: 6,580

    73RR
    Member

    Flux core, as noted is messy. Be sure to by several cans of anti-spatter aerosol and put a coat on everything in the vicinity that you want to keep clean.
     
    270dodge likes this.
  8. Flux Core sucks for sheet metal.
    Good for fences, gates, dumpsters, and trailers.

    Don't be cheap, do it right.
    Buy a bottle.
     
    stillrunners likes this.
  9. scrap metal 48
    Joined: Sep 6, 2009
    Posts: 6,075

    scrap metal 48
    Member

    Have used a flux core welder for 15 years(the same one) and does everything I ask of it...
     
  10. Fedcospeed
    Joined: Aug 17, 2008
    Posts: 2,011

    Fedcospeed
    Member

    Flux-core is mostly for structural items tubing,angle,channel and plate and has to be run in the flat position.I welded 1/8 wire on heavy plate when I worked at Niagara Machine & Tool Works.Had a puddle the size of a quarter.I really hate this stuff because of the smoke factor,but if you want a hot weld on heavy steel its the way to go.Sheet metal, NO
     
  11. If you're welding outside in the wind, flux-core is great.
     
    49ratfink and 270dodge like this.
  12. falconsprint63
    Joined: May 17, 2007
    Posts: 2,359

    falconsprint63
    Member
    from Mayberry

    flux core works fine but is messy--lots of spatter. I used it for ages for light structrual and patch panels and got really good with it then added a bottle when I started splitting a shop with a buddy who had a true mig machine. I couldn't beleive the difference it made. I just hadn't known any better.
     
  13. dirty old man
    Joined: Feb 2, 2008
    Posts: 8,912

    dirty old man
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    You can tack and "spot in" sheet metal with more and more tacks between the one you already have put down to "stitch" it together with flux core. But if you try to fill in between tacks with a continuous bead, beware the burn thru. Most times it will end up looking like chicken shit on a tin roof.
     
  14. If you are getting a welder to build a hot rod, I think that you would be much better off to save up enough to buy a mig machine.
    -Pat
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2014
    270dodge likes this.
  15. Nope, not true.
    Flux core can be run out of position. I ran miles of it when I was in construction, mostly NR211 Innershield wire
     
  16. jseery
    Joined: Sep 4, 2013
    Posts: 743

    jseery
    Member
    from Wichita KS

    I have used flux core and did not like it at all! There are some responses on this thread that seems to have a different experience, but I would not use it for anything. If you want to give it a try, get a unit that is upgradeable to gas. A lot of them have gas add-on kits so should not be hard to find.
     
    270dodge likes this.
  17. seb fontana
    Joined: Sep 1, 2005
    Posts: 7,029

    seb fontana
    Member
    from ct

    Thats where it works the best...Some anti-spatter spray will help with clean up..
     
  18. jseery
    Joined: Sep 4, 2013
    Posts: 743

    jseery
    Member
    from Wichita KS

    The outdoor issue is a good comment. Gas does not work well in any type of breeze, so if you are thinking about welding outside or where there is a lot of air movement, gas MIG can be a problem.
     
    270dodge likes this.
  19. Fedcospeed
    Joined: Aug 17, 2008
    Posts: 2,011

    Fedcospeed
    Member

    Your right, I did some vertical up with thinner stuff.The heavy was all flat and fillets.Not claiming know it all just what I did. Hoping to just help the post author out.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2014
  20. alphabet soup
    Joined: Jan 8, 2011
    Posts: 1,525

    alphabet soup
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Sheet metal, maybe not. Floor pans, ok. Frame rails, yes. I like the way it welds. Did not like all the splatter.
     
  21. Petejoe
    Joined: Nov 27, 2002
    Posts: 10,960

    Petejoe
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Zoar, Ohio

    Working for Babcock and Wilcox welding x-ray we welded with flux core wire. That company practically created most of the welding manufacturing processes. It is the only wire that can weld vertical up and still pass x-ray.
    It does splatter some and the smaller machines are messy for sheetmetal. I'd invest in a gas machine if I was spending some money.
     
    loudbang likes this.
  22. mink
    Joined: Oct 4, 2007
    Posts: 1,310

    mink
    Member
    from CT

    The best birthday gift I got was a Lincoln welder from.. Home Depot. Was under $400. I welded gas less for 5 yrs, mainly sheetmetal, No problems. I did weld 1/8th occasionally.

    I bought a miller tig welder three years ago and love it but it hurts having to fill that argon bottle up all the time. With gas less you don't get that issue. Give this some thought

    Just before I bought the tig, I bought a tank for the Lincoln welder so I could go with gas. It's nice , but I barely use the mig any more.
     
  23. Crankhole
    Joined: Apr 7, 2005
    Posts: 2,626

    Crankhole
    Member

    If you must use gasless, buy quality flux core wire. It makes a huge difference when it comes to splatter.
     
  24. fsae0607
    Joined: Apr 3, 2012
    Posts: 871

    fsae0607
    Member

    Lincoln Innershield NR-211!!!
     
  25. 49ratfink
    Joined: Feb 8, 2004
    Posts: 18,082

    49ratfink
    Member
    from California

    kind of a trick question. I used to build elevators and we had a nice Hobart wire feed welder on the job from time to time. we never used gas because of wind. it was great for structural welding where it does not matter what it looks like when you are done. you could still make a nice weld, but you end up with spatter all over. I could see using one in automotive fabrication though gas is way better and there would be more cleanup

    if you are thinking of buying a Chinese cheapo then I would say no.
     
  26. 1/8 wire puts some metal down don't it. :) once you get past 5/64 wire there's not much out of position welding. Now don't forget, welding questions here are auto related mostly and these guys won't be running 1/8 wire in the garage.
     
  27. indyjps
    Joined: Feb 21, 2007
    Posts: 4,246

    indyjps
    Member

    Flux core in an industrial machine laying down 8mm fillets, yes I love that. In a 110v buzz box, not so much. I think if your a good welder you can make Flux core work on sheetmetal, it wont look great and it will be frustrating. I wouldn't recommend Flux core in a 110 machine on sheetmetal for a beginner.
     
  28. good thread guys....thanks....
     
  29. Don't buy cheap imported wire PERIOD.

    And don't buy those shitty little 2 pound spools.
    Too expensive, and the small diameter makes the wire too hard to straighten.
    Buy a 10 lb spool.
     
  30. cdoh
    Joined: Apr 30, 2014
    Posts: 216

    cdoh
    Member
    from chicago

    Still new to welding and I have an Eastwood 135 that I got for a good price. This is 1/4 metal that I used flux core to weld. I basically maxed out the machine voltage wise and preheated the metal with a propane torch, then I cut the metal in half to check penetration. Not too bad I would say. I do like this machine for home use. ImageUploadedByH.A.M.B.1428976205.970440.jpg
     

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