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Technical Fuel block on firewall; hard lines to carbs question

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by 53 hemi, Sep 6, 2019.

  1. 53 hemi
    Joined: Jan 8, 2009
    Posts: 419

    53 hemi
    Member

    Like the title says - I'm getting ready to plumb up my fuel system. I want to run a hard line up my firewall to a fuel block, feeding two carbs. Hard lines look better that rubber, but I'm a little concerned about the integrity of copper lines. Would steel lines, with a loop, have enough flexibility to not break? Or should I just run rubber from the firewall to the carbs?

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  2. AngleDrive
    Joined: Mar 9, 2006
    Posts: 690

    AngleDrive
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Florida

    You need something flexible. Hard lines will crack.
     
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  3. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 2,695

    Boneyard51
    Member

    Your engine “ wiggles “ in the engine compartment. Your body also flexes, a hard line would not last long. If you are determined to do it, be sure you put several coils in the line, so that the flex is spread out!






    Bones
     
  4. 53 hemi
    Joined: Jan 8, 2009
    Posts: 419

    53 hemi
    Member

    Yeah, this is what I was expecting. I saw a car using copper lines with loops... sometimes I think the rubber looks a little less "finished", but I do like the look of the fuel block on the firewall...

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  5. You could attach the fuel block solidly to the firewall and run hard lines to the carbs, but with short segments of rubber hose (either at the fuel block or at the carbs) to absorb the vibrations. :) This would also require bracing the hard lines with some sort of bracket(s) to keep them from flopping around.

    Notice the short hoses between the carbs and hard lines on this roadster?:cool:
    turquoise A 02.jpg
     
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  6. And do not use copper for fuel lines.......vibrations will make it work harden and crack. For a "second" on that statement..........your car will not pass NSRA inspection if it has copper fuel lines.
    Possibly what you saw was NiCopp lines that, although can be polished to look like stainless, will turn a coppery color after a few years. NiCopp would be the way to go unless your building a jewel showcar, like the roadster pic.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2019
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  7. RMONTY
    Joined: Jan 7, 2016
    Posts: 1,335

    RMONTY
    Member

    I like those short rubber hoses on that roadster. That looks very clean!
     
  8. Mike VV
    Joined: Sep 28, 2010
    Posts: 1,572

    Mike VV
    Member
    from SoCal

    Pretty simple really...

    When you step on the throttle, the engine moves toward the right.
    When you back off the throttle, the engine moves back to the left.
    When you hit the throttle, the engine moves toward the rear.
    When you hit the brakes, the engine moves forward.

    Design for those movements.

    Mike
     
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  9. Joe H
    Joined: Feb 10, 2008
    Posts: 766

    Joe H
    Member

    The only time you want to run fuel line like the roadster has, is with solid motor mounts. Thats a fire waiting to happen when they break, and that short section of hose is not going to help.

    There is a reason the factory mounted the fuel pumps low down on the later engines, its closer to the crankshaft where the rotation ( movement ) in the frame less. Less movement is easier on fuel lines. 4"" to 6" minimum engine to frame.
     
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  10. lostone
    Joined: Oct 13, 2013
    Posts: 861

    lostone
    Member
    from kansas

    Another point is the difference between a show car and a driver. There are things that work and look cool on a show car but wouldn't live very long on the street and I'd say hard gas lines are one of those items.

    Can't imagine running down the road at 55 having a gas line break spraying gas on the windshield just in time for some spray to hit those hot headers, bam!! In an heart beat it's a scene from Christine !!
     
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  11. The Shift Wizard
    Joined: Jan 10, 2017
    Posts: 1,422

    The Shift Wizard
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I've used braided stainless, hydraulic type hose with fittings on some O/T cars....... but that might not be a look you want on an old rod. But how about mostly hard lines with about a one-foot section of hose parallel to the valve cover, then fabricate a shiny, chrome cover to float over the hose portion and hide it?
     
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  12. Joe H
    Joined: Feb 10, 2008
    Posts: 766

    Joe H
    Member

    Or, mount the regulator / fuel block on the engine, run the hard lines, but run rubber up to the block out of site. You have the same look without the fire hazard.
     
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  13. Tri-power37
    Joined: Feb 10, 2019
    Posts: 295

    Tri-power37
    Member

    Fuel pressure regulator mounted to the firewall running down to the aluminum fuel log.
    0CF04782-0FEE-46BF-B6E0-7005D5F29890.jpeg
    6C159EE2-C387-4E08-84DD-DB284D478941.jpeg
    0FF05D02-18C6-4F98-A457-974946F8EC3B.jpeg
     
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  14. 427 sleeper
    Joined: Mar 8, 2017
    Posts: 608

    427 sleeper
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Whatever you decide, you gotta have rubber somewhere to isolate the vibration differences between the engine and body/chassis.
     
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  15. WB69
    Joined: Dec 7, 2008
    Posts: 818

    WB69
    Member

    Agree.....
     
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  16. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 2,695

    Boneyard51
    Member

    Another reason Ford moved the fuel pump forward , to the side and low, was to eliminate “ vapor lock” common on the Flatheads, with the fuel pump high, in the middle and toward the back. Ford did this in 1954, Chevy followed in 1955.





    Bones
     
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  17. tb33anda3rd
    Joined: Oct 8, 2010
    Posts: 15,100

    tb33anda3rd
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    1. Connecticut HAMB'ers

    when did chevy EVER have it high and in the rear?
     
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  18. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 2,695

    Boneyard51
    Member

    Chevy never did as far as I know. They came out with the 265 in 1955 and had the fuel pump in a similar place as the Ford Y block. The car manufacturers were aware of what the others were doing . Ford learned that they had the fuel pump in the wrong place on the Flathead and corrected it on the Y block. Chevy was aware of the Flathead problem and did the same thing as Ford.... only on the other side.
     
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  19. Mr T body
    Joined: Nov 2, 2005
    Posts: 2,017

    Mr T body
    Alliance Vendor
    from SoCal

    Here's what I did on my '31. Works fine, not too obnoxious, but still looking for something different.
    [​IMG]
     
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  20. 53 hemi
    Joined: Jan 8, 2009
    Posts: 419

    53 hemi
    Member

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