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Projects Frame Table, how would you do it.

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Mule Farmer, Apr 10, 2012.

  1. Mule Farmer
    Joined: Jun 1, 2005
    Posts: 1,508

    Mule Farmer
    Member
    from Holland MI

    I have been thinking about building a frame table.

    A few of the things I have been thinking about is, plates running acrossed the top of the frame table (rails) with taped holes every inch or two. That way I can bolt things to the top of it, it will be adjustable for different frame widths, cross members and such. It has to have levelers in the feet. Would like to be able to brake it down for space reasons, maybe just to be able to take the legs off so I can lean it up against the wall.

    What do you guys think is important, how long, and how wide?
     
  2. river1
    Joined: May 12, 2001
    Posts: 855

    river1
    Member

  3. 343w
    Joined: Dec 15, 2008
    Posts: 1,440

    343w
    Member

    The idea of slotted plates sounds good. I am going to build one with wheels, that way it can be moved out of the way, it can also be used to store a body on if necssary. I got a boat dolley from a friend last year made from heavy channel iron to use for the frame jig, just haven't put it together yet.
     
  4. metalman
    Joined: Dec 30, 2006
    Posts: 3,274

    metalman
    Member

    I've had my frame table 30 some odd years, pretty simple and has served me well. 2 12' heavy 8" channels spaced 2' apart. 18" high legs with levelers. I've often thought of adding plate to the top so I could bolt stuff to it but sometimes that would get in the way, good to have access from under it to what your working on. At one time I had "pockets" to hold certain jigs but it seemed they were never where I wanted them so now I just spot weld my needs to it, when I'm done knock them off and grind the weld flush. Worked well for me.
    Not sure about portable, mine weighs a ton so I don't move it often. I do have some old solid doors I throw on it when I'm not using it so it doubles as an extra work bench.
    temp_029.JPG
     
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  5. Mule Farmer
    Joined: Jun 1, 2005
    Posts: 1,508

    Mule Farmer
    Member
    from Holland MI

  6. VoodooTwin
    Joined: Jul 13, 2011
    Posts: 3,455

    VoodooTwin
    Member
    from Noo Yawk

  7. badshifter
    Joined: Apr 28, 2006
    Posts: 3,129

    badshifter
    Member

    Here are my 2. 800 bucks for the one on the left from a Boeing auction 4'x12'. The one on the right is a 12' by 18"slotted fixture plate. 300 bucks at a machinery auction. When I moved I took the one on wheels. The big one weighed 8000 pounds. Gave it to a friend who builds racecars.
     

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  8. Beef Stew
    Joined: Oct 9, 2008
    Posts: 1,253

    Beef Stew
    Member
    from So Cal

    here's mine. cost me about $150 to build it. it's available for long term use for free if anyone wants it (in so cal).

    [​IMG]
     
  9. donut29
    Joined: Mar 6, 2006
    Posts: 1,518

    donut29
    Member
    from canton MI

  10. good info here, thanks guys

    Brad
     
  11. Don's Hot Rods
    Joined: Oct 7, 2005
    Posts: 8,319

    Don's Hot Rods
    Member
    from florida

    To me, the first thing a person needs to determine before building one is how often it will get used. If it is one that you are going to be using often then the more permanent type, with legs, levelers, etc, make sense. But if you are only going to use it every few years, then one that is stowable takes up less room.

    When my Son Dan built ours years ago he made it from some heavy steel channel and made it so we can prop it up against a wall when not in use. We didn't want a 4 x 8 table taking up valuable floor space when we might only use it every two to 3 years.

    This is the one he made, and it has served us well. Probably 7 or 8 frames have been made on it and all we do is clamp the frame pieces down with C clamps every so often and things can't move. Not the fanciest one around, but it works.

    Don

    [​IMG]

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    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2012
  12. krylon32
    Joined: Jan 29, 2006
    Posts: 6,077

    krylon32
    Alliance Vendor
    from Nebraska

    25 years ago I built the frame table I still use. 2X6x11 gauge rec tube frame work with adjustable feet on the bottom, covered by a 4X10X1/2inch sheet of steel. 1200 + chassis have been built on this table and it's still going strong. The reason I did it this way was because when I started space was at a premium and I build 28-40 Ford chassis and did not have room for a fixture for each type of chassis. It has worked good for me all these years.
     
  13. willymakeit
    Joined: Apr 13, 2009
    Posts: 1,326

    willymakeit
    Member

    Anyone ever use wood ijoist. I know wood moves a little and is flamable, but you can get the ijoist cheap espc. if it is for a one time use.
     
  14. 100_1423.jpg

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    This is the one I built about 12 years a go. Has served me verry well! Prob built 50 plus chassis on it! In the pics I am doing a 50 chevy truck chassis. Using my adjustable fixtures. I have other fixtures for model A,32,34 and 35 to 40 ford chassis.
    It has leveling feet on it and is very flat and stout!
     
  15. big daddy Raleigh
    Joined: Jul 11, 2008
    Posts: 123

    big daddy Raleigh
    Member
    from Denver CO

    Here's the one I built. it's 5'x14' and the working surface is 2"x12". It's slightly large for the model a yet I built it to sub frame a caddy or continental in the future. It has four trailer jack so I can lift it and move it around. It's leveled with 4 1" all thread and nuts welded to a pad with a thin layer of rubber under it. The top is filled with sand to help deaden the sound (I live in an hoa community). I found all the green steel laying in a field and between a couple of 2x3 stick and other parts im in it for cheap!! The bolt hole idea is great- i just weld to mine. One thing i would do differently would be to make it just about knee high.
     

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  16. Mark68
    Joined: Sep 12, 2010
    Posts: 130

    Mark68
    Member

    I just made one i can use for doing my A body and frame( sorry no pics yet). i took the frame from a 49 f-6 i just cut up for parts,and cut it 12' from the back end of the frame,made my own removeable and ajustable legs with both wheels and adjustable feet.then i bolted down some 3/4" plywood i had on it so ican use it as a cart,work table or whatever just by putting a different top on it. the frames top rail is strait for about 13' on this truck and its a double frame so its plenty sturdy. When i dont need it unbolt the legs and stand it up on its side and store it out of the way
     
  17. Don's Hot Rods
    Joined: Oct 7, 2005
    Posts: 8,319

    Don's Hot Rods
    Member
    from florida

    I guess it would be better than nothing at all, but steel is just so much more rigid and immovable. Sometimes you can find suitable steel at your local scrap yard and pay pennies a pound for it.

    One thing I like about ours is that we can flip it over with our gantry or an engine lift. My Son prefers to weld stuff on a horizontal surface, as opposed to on a vertical or overhead surface, so we keep flipping a frame all around so he is always welding straight down. It does get a little heavy because the jig probably weighs 200-300 pounds and then add the weight of a frame to that, but our gantry does the heavy lifting for us.

    Don

    [​IMG]
     
  18. Dane
    Joined: May 6, 2010
    Posts: 1,353

    Dane
    Member
    from Soquel, CA

    I think access from underneath for welding and other tasks is very important. Wheels to move it around are nice to have so you can roll it out of the way when the project needs to go away for a while.

    Obviously it need to be wide and long enough to fit what you will be building in the future.
     
  19. Don's Hot Rods
    Joined: Oct 7, 2005
    Posts: 8,319

    Don's Hot Rods
    Member
    from florida

    4 x 8 (maybe 4 x 10 now that I think about it) is what we have and it works out fine for the 1930 ish frames we work on. Later cars may need a bigger surface, but we don't do those.

    Don
     
  20. mace69
    Joined: Apr 11, 2010
    Posts: 153

    mace69
    Member
    from mass

    Ok, I have to ask... What are you running for a drive train in this pic?
     

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