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Projects Find of a lifetime, for me 35 3 window!

Discussion in 'Traditional Hot Rods' started by Ralph Moore, Jul 9, 2016.

  1. chev34ute
    Joined: Nov 13, 2011
    Posts: 651

    chev34ute
    Member

    A rare find indeed and it looks surprisingly well preserved to boot. No doubt about it, the 35s look a lot prettier than the 36s.
     
  2. Fire Fox
    Joined: Aug 24, 2015
    Posts: 133

    Fire Fox

    Great find, congrats!
     
  3. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 5,684

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    When I first came to Alaska in 1975 that car sat in a lot with a '32 Ford woodie off Peger behind where Dr.Dee's vet clinic is now. Neither car were for sale.it moved around for years.last I saw it is was towards the river near Repp Rd....still not for sale.Good score Ralph.
     
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  4. 48fordnut
    Joined: Nov 4, 2005
    Posts: 3,439

    48fordnut
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

     
  5. 48fordnut
    Joined: Nov 4, 2005
    Posts: 3,439

    48fordnut
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I ret in 80, was a B52 gunner. Been into cars for over 60 yrs. Daughter is married to a ex AF fiber optics guy. His folks are in Ak, so they stayed there.
     
  6. Ralph Moore
    Joined: May 1, 2007
    Posts: 617

    Ralph Moore
    Member

    That's amazing that it went so long with nothing being done to it. It still has a territorial title.
    But I know of alot of cars that are not for sale and never will be, because of the "I'm going to fix it up someday" syndrome.
    I also know where there is a 1935 Packard coupe rusting away, beautiful car too.
     
    USMercUte and kidcampbell71 like this.
  7. Great score, the 35-36 3W are some of my favorites. With the wide-5's, I bet it has 39 brakes on it. Car certainly has good shape from the pics, nice that it stayed in decent shape and unmolested over all the years.
     
  8. hotrodyankee
    Joined: Jun 27, 2016
    Posts: 304

    hotrodyankee
    Member

    Congrats, always fun getting a car running again!
     
  9. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 5,684

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    Well,look at how long Mel kept his cars before selling them and then there is Captain Clayton.Both of those guys had a lot cars for years they wouldn't sell.
     
  10. Ralph Moore
    Joined: May 1, 2007
    Posts: 617

    Ralph Moore
    Member

    That's true. Good to see some of them on the road now.
     
  11. scrap metal 48
    Joined: Sep 6, 2009
    Posts: 5,497

    scrap metal 48
    Member

  12. lewk
    Joined: Apr 8, 2011
    Posts: 699

    lewk
    Member
    from Mt

    What a cool find!
     
  13. mgtstumpy
    Joined: Jul 20, 2006
    Posts: 7,069

    mgtstumpy
    Member

    Great score, enormous potential.
     
  14. Ralph Moore
    Joined: May 1, 2007
    Posts: 617

    Ralph Moore
    Member

    Finally started work yesterday. Pulled the grille/ radiator, motors stuck good. So going to pull it and put in the spare.
    Have not run it yet, but it turns over easy and previous owner had it running on test stand.
    After closer inspection, I not only have 39 brakes, but entire 39 suspension.
    And from the looks of it the column and steering gear might be out of a 46, I say that because the gearbox looks identical to the 47 in the shop now, and it has a gray shift knob which was 46 color.
     
    Stogy likes this.
  15. Great find! Where did you find it? Was it stored inside? It appears to have very little rust.
     
  16. manyolcars
    Joined: Mar 30, 2001
    Posts: 7,572

    manyolcars

    I love your car but would get rid of the fishing-lure paint job
     
  17. Ralph Moore
    Joined: May 1, 2007
    Posts: 617

    Ralph Moore
    Member

    No, it was outside, lots of floor rot behind seat.

    I know about the two tone paint job, but color is the last thing on my plate for this car now.
    I may soda blast and primer it next spring.
    Only have so many days left till winter sets in.
     
    Stogy likes this.
  18. Ralph Moore
    Joined: May 1, 2007
    Posts: 617

    Ralph Moore
    Member

    Update! So it’s been a long strange trip. Had a rough winter last year, but finally started working on the 35. [​IMG]
    Slowly stripping the old paint off. [​IMG]
    No bondo in this old girl, all leaded. A few issues here and there but a pretty solid body. [​IMG]


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  19. Ralph Moore
    Joined: May 1, 2007
    Posts: 617

    Ralph Moore
    Member

    Left rear fender was the worst. Also needed to drop the fuel tank to install new Bob Drake tank, so the fender came off to access filler neck.
    But I ended up torching it out of the tank as it would not budge.


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  20. Ralph Moore
    Joined: May 1, 2007
    Posts: 617

    Ralph Moore
    Member

    Of course I found worse after tank was removed. Inner rear panel looked like Frankenstein with all the welds in it. Here’s the fender. [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  21. Ralph Moore
    Joined: May 1, 2007
    Posts: 617

    Ralph Moore
    Member

    Been working in getting the spare tire mount area straight, and I removed the inner structure of the mount to straighten it and install new cage nuts.


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
    fourspd2quad and Stogy like this.
  22. Rickybop
    Joined: May 23, 2008
    Posts: 5,385

    Rickybop
    Member
    from Michigan

    Lucky mf'er!!!
    I mean...ummm...very happy for you. :D
    Good to see you working on it.
    Looks better already!
     
    deathrowdave likes this.
  23. Retrorod
    Joined: Jan 25, 2006
    Posts: 1,989

    Retrorod
    Member

    Very cool find!! Wait til you are cruising down the road...believe me, the view through the windshield makes all the work worthwhile. I've been driving my '35 for 18 years and I never tire of that view out over the hood.
     
  24. oliver westlund
    Joined: Dec 19, 2018
    Posts: 541

    oliver westlund
    Member

    awesome car! always wanted to recreate dads first car which was a 36 5 window, too bad last one i saw was a shell for 12k haha pipe dreams! yours is super cool, love the story too. i was born in fairbanks and grew up in alaska!
     
  25. Have to think I'd use the lack of grille as an excuse to put a Packard or Lasalle in there. Other than that I wouldn't change much. Looks like it's in good hands.
     
  26. Ralph Moore
    Joined: May 1, 2007
    Posts: 617

    Ralph Moore
    Member

    Actually, I have a Packard grille hanging on the wall, but, I found a good replacement 35 grille. [​IMG]


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
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  27. Ralph Moore
    Joined: May 1, 2007
    Posts: 617

    Ralph Moore
    Member

    The outer skin of the body is pretty good, a few spots of rust, but overall nice. The underside however![​IMG]
    Inner panel will need replacing,
    [​IMG]
    Rear cross member pretty tweaked, The holes you see are for the bottom of the spare tire mount. These are supposed to go through the crossmember.
    [​IMG]
    And the rear floor is Swiss cheese.
    But, I plan on trying to get her on the road this summer and worry about the pretty stuff later.
    My goal is to have it at the Father’s Day car show in remembrance of my Dad, who I lost exactly one year ago today.
    My Dad was a true craftsman, a pattern maker,
    part draftsman, part wood worker, part machinist, part mathematician, part metallurgist, and more.
    He was able to take an idea on paper and turn it into a working product.
    Miss you Dad....



    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2019
  28. Ralph Moore
    Joined: May 1, 2007
    Posts: 617

    Ralph Moore
    Member

    Worked on the drivers side fender today, now I’m no body man by any means. Straitened it out a bit thanks to my Christmas gift from my son, Eastwood dead blow panel hammers and leather beater bag. [​IMG]
    The inner fender well is in surprisingly good shape. [​IMG]


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  29. 36 Penny Coupe
    Joined: Jan 7, 2014
    Posts: 154

    36 Penny Coupe
    Member
    from VA

    Beautiful Car! Congratulations. Barn finds are still out there. I started driving my car late last year. Dream come true and well worth the process.


    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
  30. 50DropTop
    Joined: May 6, 2004
    Posts: 127

    50DropTop
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Looking better there bud! With some hammer and dolly work, you should be able to get that fender straightened right back out. You’ve got the benefit of no underlying support structure that would restrict you from getting a dolly on the backside. I know you said you’re no body man and I certainly don’t claim to be, but I’ve had some pretty good experience with help from some very talented people over the years. With that, I’ve got a couple tips for you if you’re interested (you may already know these techniques from your experience with your dad).

    I recommend using the ‘off dolly’ method as much as you can. This is where the dolly is placed on the underside of the panel and pressure is applied to the low spot. Using a FLAT faced body hammer, gentle but firm/precise hits are made to the surrounding high spots ( off the dolly). When you hear the ‘ping’ of the dolly, stop and move; a ping represents stretch and a stretch will potentially need shrinking. The idea is that you bring the low spot up using pressure from behind while gently moving the high spots down. I always find it good to check the location of my dolly with my hammer...very slight taps (it’s like just touching the hammer to the metal) will give you the sound difference to confirm your dolly placement.

    If you have substantially low areas that you’re not able to raise with ‘off dolly’, then move your dolly to the top side of the metal, and using a ROUND face body hammer, knock the low areas up using the ‘on dolly’ method (hitting the low area directly below where you’ve held the dolly). Again, when you hear the ping, you’ve raised the metal and have contacted the dolly...keep moving.

    My general rule is FLAT hammer for outside, ROUND hammer for inside. Always choose the dolly that most closely matches the contour and remember ‘ping’ means stretch.

    Also, it may give you better support to remount the fender and do the hammer and dolly work on the car. Ergonomically it may be challenging, but the fender will be less likely to move on you in a fixed position versus on a stand.

    There is a great book that describes all these techniques. It’s in reproduction now and should be readily available. I’ve posted a photo below.
    8E7D3464-2FBA-455E-B31C-B5A246ECC3F4.jpeg

    Finally, I would recommend investing in a shrinking disc. It’s a stainless disc that attaches to a angle grinder that targets high spots in metal. The spinning of the discs injects heat to ONLY the high spots, and when quenched the metal shrinks back to its original position. It’s sorcery man!
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2019

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