Register now to get rid of these ads!

Technical El Camino Drip Rail Shaving Advice

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by BDUB77, Feb 24, 2020.

  1. BDUB77
    Joined: Nov 16, 2018
    Posts: 111

    BDUB77
    Member

    I am looking for advice / a sanity check. I have removed the rusty drip rails on my 64 elky and I am preparing to weld in the new metal. My current plan is to fabricate some channel that will be welded to the roof, then welded to the door jamb rather than the remaining metal where I cut the drip rail. (also part of the inner roof) I have seen people simply shave the rails and weld the gap, but it leaves a strange looking gap between the roof and the door jamb. Also where the roof meets the front pillar, I was planning on doing a pie cut on the inside of the windshield channel to bring the roof down far enough for a smooth transition to the pillar. Has anyone done this before? Am I going to be causing any issues doing it this way? Am I overthinking it?
    Thanks - Brandon
    IMG_3931.JPG IMG_3931.JPG IMG_3939.JPG IMG_3939.JPG IMG_3931.JPG IMG_3939.JPG IMG_3931.JPG IMG_3939.JPG IMG_3940.JPG IMG_3943.JPG IMG_3944.JPG IMG_3946.JPG
     
  2. Gearhead Graphics
    Joined: Oct 4, 2008
    Posts: 3,852

    Gearhead Graphics
    Member
    from Denver Co

    I like where youre headed.Patch it up and clean the gap. One of the neatest solutions I saw was to run 3/8 round stock and just leave the little channel for water to run down.
     
  3. jnaki
    Joined: Jan 1, 2015
    Posts: 6,391

    jnaki

    upload_2020-2-24_10-27-24.png
    Hello,
    As a past owner of a 1965 El Camino from new until 1976 with 125k miles on it, the car is solid as it comes from the factory. I had no problems until I decided to sell it and then it heard me. The water pump then needed replacement. No other major repair for all of those road trip miles, must mean something about reliability. We have been through all sorts of weather, including pouring rain in Santa Barbara, drizzle along the coastal beaches, and snow in the mountains. But, the drip rails on the cab are there for a purpose. In any weather with moisture or drizzle, it channels the water past the top, down and out away from the door opening.

    As nice as it looks without the drip rail, it is necessary. No one likes water seeping into the door openings. when stopped anywhere in the rain, getting in and out isn't a wet situation. Without the drip rails, water will drip incessantly down on the driver and passenger. The look will be smooth and cool to a point, but function has to be over form in this case. You will be driving a nice looking modification on the cab, but will suffer the wetness of any moisture upon entering or leaving the El Camino cab.
    upload_2020-2-24_10-27-44.png

    Jnaki

    Of course, what you are doing will make it look different than most. But again, the water will just roll over the curve and drip down on the door sill and rug. If the area behind the seats starts getting wet with the incursion of water or slight moisture, it will smell like a wet dog in the small cabin. The depressed area (rear area foot well) behind the seats is a perfect spot for catching all of the moisture/drips that you can't see and start the doggy smell. You won't notice it until the water drips start accumulating and then it will need repair or removal of the carpeting.

    Not to be a naysayer, but driving that new El Camino for all of those years into old age, one gets to know the little things that pop up. If you are building a custom car for shows only and not as a daily driver through all sorts of weather, the drip rail less look will be fine. But, for the daily driver through all weather fronts and all kinds of moisture, leave the rails where they are, or replace any rusted out versions.


    YRMV
     
  4. jnaki
    Joined: Jan 1, 2015
    Posts: 6,391

    jnaki







    Hello,
    If there is any way to do a test on your drip rail less door opening, do this test. Shut all doors and windows. Start a slow water hose from the middle of the front windshield on the roof. Angle it toward the back and side, so the water flow goes towards the drip rail less area. Watch where the water goes. Now, open the door after the water slows down and see where it goes.

    It will show you a wet environment for all drivers and passengers. Try it with your smooth rolled edges and see how that affects the flow of water. If it works, then great...nice design. If not, then you are in for some wet situations.

    Again, rain and wetness is a slight bother to most people. But, the constant situation of water dripping on your heads and clothes may be a real nuisance. It looks like you are not too far along to reverse course and add in some replacement drip rails colored the same as your El Camino will be. That will help somewhat over them being chromed.

    Jnaki
    As much as there are people who criticize factory car designers, they do a lot of testing in all sorts of weather situations. It is done over and over to correct any problems, so there will be no backlash from their high dollar designs. No one likes a factory recall.
     

  5. BDUB77
    Joined: Nov 16, 2018
    Posts: 111

    BDUB77
    Member

    Thanks Jnaki. I have actually owned this car since 1995 and just finished replacing rusted out window and windshield channel, so I am familiar with the moisture smell.
     
    jnaki likes this.
  6. BDUB77
    Joined: Nov 16, 2018
    Posts: 111

    BDUB77
    Member

    Thanks!
     
  7. jimmy six
    Joined: Mar 21, 2006
    Posts: 10,242

    jimmy six
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Your El Ca may be old enough but I don’t think a good razor will work. I would remove them without shaving them.
     

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2021 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.