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Folks Of Interest Bruce Lancaster

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by SUHRsc, Oct 31, 2019.

  1. prpmmp
    Joined: Dec 12, 2011
    Posts: 1,072

    prpmmp
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Very Sad!! My Condolences to His loved ones. Pete
     
    Stogy likes this.
  2. continentaljohn
    Joined: Jul 24, 2002
    Posts: 4,812

    continentaljohn
    Member

    Very sad to hear RIP
     
    Stogy likes this.
  3. Very sad. He was an icon. His name was synonymous with old Fords.
    He will most assuredly be missed by everyone.
     
    Stogy likes this.
  4. I never had the pleasure of meeting Bruce, however; I have a large 3-ring notebook crammed with Flathead Ford era information gleaned from the Hamb, Ford Barn and a few other places over the last 20 years. Bruce's name is probably on at least half of those posts... Always well written, entertaining to read and very helpful; he was always great about passing on what he knew.

    He will be missed. Condolences to his friends and family.
     
    -Brent- and Stogy like this.
  5. Deuce Lover
    Joined: Feb 15, 2009
    Posts: 774

    Deuce Lover
    Member

    Shocked doesn't come close to describing my feelings.Adieu Bruce .
     
  6. Stogy
    Joined: Feb 10, 2007
    Posts: 19,114

    Stogy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Condolences to the Lancaster Family and Friends on the passing of this giving Man Bruce...Part of his legacy will be his presence here and fortunately his knowledge will remain intact here for us to glean and appreciate going forward...that will also give us a moment to remember him as I do many others who have left for the big sky...

    Thanks @SUHRsc for your heartfelt thoughts and condolences in your loss...
     
  7. He was a wealth of knowledge and seemed to love sharing it.
    Condolences to his friends and loved ones.

    Mick
     
    AVater likes this.
  8. Mart
    Joined: Mar 3, 2001
    Posts: 4,379

    Mart
    Member

    This is awful news. very sad.
    I had a few conversations (via the forums) with Bruce and he always was able to share freely his knowledge, judgement and advice.
    The hobby has lost a good 'un.
    Mart.
     
    Stogy and sidevalve8ba like this.
  9. I am very sorry and shocked to hear this. I checked in here every day to see if there are any news about him.
     
    Stogy likes this.
  10. Petejoe
    Joined: Nov 27, 2002
    Posts: 10,850

    Petejoe
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Zoar, Ohio

    A repeat from his first thread.


    I can’t express how broken-hearted I am to hear Bruce left us.
    His written words over the past decades will forever be documented for us and future generations.
    A very kind soul willing to share everything. Bruce. See you on the other side. Rick.


    I posted this on a thread many years ago.
    The web page is non existent but I was lucky enough to capture the article.

    Shelf Life: Bruce Lancaster’s bookshelves offer a window into his—and Drew’s—history

    by Margery Ashmun, Reference Librarian

    Since grade school, we’ve been told that when it comes to others, we shouldn’t judge a book by its cover. That said, like any rule, there remain some fun and noteworthy exceptions, where someone’s surroundings and what they collect shines a light on their inner self. Meet Drew University Library’s Bruce Lancaster, our longtime reference associate and a delightful exception to this axiom.
    Just poke your head through Bruce’s office door— it’s typically open—and his unique background and interests quickly become apparent. Bruce’s desk, bookshelves and walls are brimming with more than four decades of intriguing collectibles, from the humorous cartoons he circulates throughout the Reference Department to his toys, gadgets, magazines and a quirky cache of odds ’n ends. To the casual observer or first-time visitor, what may look like flotsam and jetsam actually hold clues to an interesting and varied life, a timeline of items ranging from World War II paraphernalia and cartoon character figurines to relics of Bruce’s early and recent years at Drew.
    There’s no shortage of eye-catching items worth investigating. Start with the figurine of two mini-rats—one black, one white— engaged in hand-to-hand combat. While immediately familiar as pop culture kitsch, they also offer hints of Bruce’s interest in the intersection of art, politics and satire. In fact, the roiled rodents represent a slice of classic Cold War humor—MAD Magazine’s “Spy vs Spy” cartoons—the creation of Antonio Prohias, a Cuban artist and political activist. Prohias became a contributor to MAD after fleeing Cuba in 1960, when his caustic cartoons critical of the Castro regime raised hackles with the new dictator, who accused him of spying for the CIA. These figurines reflect both Bruce’s dry, dark sense of humor and his longtime interest in geopolitical affairs, something he cultivated from his earliest days as a child of the military.

    A Man of the World
    Bruce was born in China in the 1940s to a family headed by a former Marine Corps colonel (Bruce Lancaster Sr.), who worked as a Foreign Service officer stationed at the American Embassy in Nanking. After many years of serving the United States at diplomatic outposts around the globe (England, Germany and Hungary among them), the elder Lancaster rose to the rank of deputy assistant secretary of state under President Lyndon Johnson. As a result of his father’s service and having lived in Asia, South America and Europe, Bruce has long had a front-row seat for world affairs.

    Arriving at Drew in the early 1970s, Bruce started as a student in the Theological School prior to joining the library staff. Over the years, his talents have been utilized across various departments, but ultimately Bruce found his niche within the reference area. His institutional knowledge is second to none, and he’s a go-to source for most things library related. For a hint about Bruce’s history here, consider a small wooden device known as a Gaylord Fine Computer, which he fondly refers to as the library’s first computer. While looking eerily similar to a golf tee pegboard game that one might play at a family restaurant, the Gaylord is more likely a distant cousin of the abacus. Its sole function: calculating overdue fines for library users. Bruce discovered the device as a student employee around 1972, finding it tucked into a drawer deep in the Circulation Department. Immediately intrigued, he saved the device after it had become obsolete for his own burgeoning collection, where it remains today.
    A small, manila-colored card entitled How to Teach reveals a clue to how an unconventional reference professional like Bruce might have developed his instruction skills. Look closely and you’ll notice a step-by-step list of tips for individuals who are new to the role of teacher. Produced by the U.S. War Instruction Board during WWII, it was distributed to American manufacturers charged with training unskilled labor, those people replacing regular employees who’d become involved in fighting the war itself. Bruce found this government relic during one of his favorite idylls: trolling New Jersey’s ubiquitous flea markets. He was intrigued by its no-nonsense tips, as well as the plight of U.S. companies teaching nontraditional workers the skills needed to stoke America’s war effort at home.

    Alongside all the cool tchotchkes lining Lancaster’s shelves, you’ll also find actual books—a slew of them, many offering their own insight into his life and work at Drew. Before judging them by their covers, though, take time to chat with Bruce. You’ll come away with some great stories about the library, its history and its most colorful staffer.

    This story originally appeared in Visions, The Library Newsletter, Spring 2017
     
  11. Wow...hate to hear this for sure. Bruce will definitely be missed. Praying for his family and all affected by this loss.
     
  12. Petejoe
    Joined: Nov 27, 2002
    Posts: 10,850

    Petejoe
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Zoar, Ohio

    I can’t express how broken-hearted I am to hear Bruce left us.
    His written words over the past decades will forever be documented for us and future generations.
    A very kind soul willing to share everything. Bruce. See you on the other side. Rick.


    I posted this on a thread many years ago.
    The web page is non existent but I was lucky enough to capture the article.

    Shelf Life: Bruce Lancaster’s bookshelves offer a window into his—and Drew’s—history

    by Margery Ashmun, Reference Librarian

    Since grade school, we’ve been told that when it comes to others, we shouldn’t judge a book by its cover. That said, like any rule, there remain some fun and noteworthy exceptions, where someone’s surroundings and what they collect shines a light on their inner self. Meet Drew University Library’s Bruce Lancaster, our longtime reference associate and a delightful exception to this axiom.
    Just poke your head through Bruce’s office door— it’s typically open—and his unique background and interests quickly become apparent. Bruce’s desk, bookshelves and walls are brimming with more than four decades of intriguing collectibles, from the humorous cartoons he circulates throughout the Reference Department to his toys, gadgets, magazines and a quirky cache of odds ’n ends. To the casual observer or first-time visitor, what may look like flotsam and jetsam actually hold clues to an interesting and varied life, a timeline of items ranging from World War II paraphernalia and cartoon character figurines to relics of Bruce’s early and recent years at Drew.
    There’s no shortage of eye-catching items worth investigating. Start with the figurine of two mini-rats—one black, one white— engaged in hand-to-hand combat. While immediately familiar as pop culture kitsch, they also offer hints of Bruce’s interest in the intersection of art, politics and satire. In fact, the roiled rodents represent a slice of classic Cold War humor—MAD Magazine’s “Spy vs Spy” cartoons—the creation of Antonio Prohias, a Cuban artist and political activist. Prohias became a contributor to MAD after fleeing Cuba in 1960, when his caustic cartoons critical of the Castro regime raised hackles with the new dictator, who accused him of spying for the CIA. These figurines reflect both Bruce’s dry, dark sense of humor and his longtime interest in geopolitical affairs, something he cultivated from his earliest days as a child of the military.

    A Man of the World
    Bruce was born in China in the 1940s to a family headed by a former Marine Corps colonel (Bruce Lancaster Sr.), who worked as a Foreign Service officer stationed at the American Embassy in Nanking. After many years of serving the United States at diplomatic outposts around the globe (England, Germany and Hungary among them), the elder Lancaster rose to the rank of deputy assistant secretary of state under President Lyndon Johnson. As a result of his father’s service and having lived in Asia, South America and Europe, Bruce has long had a front-row seat for world affairs.

    Arriving at Drew in the early 1970s, Bruce started as a student in the Theological School prior to joining the library staff. Over the years, his talents have been utilized across various departments, but ultimately Bruce found his niche within the reference area. His institutional knowledge is second to none, and he’s a go-to source for most things library related. For a hint about Bruce’s history here, consider a small wooden device known as a Gaylord Fine Computer, which he fondly refers to as the library’s first computer. While looking eerily similar to a golf tee pegboard game that one might play at a family restaurant, the Gaylord is more likely a distant cousin of the abacus. Its sole function: calculating overdue fines for library users. Bruce discovered the device as a student employee around 1972, finding it tucked into a drawer deep in the Circulation Department. Immediately intrigued, he saved the device after it had become obsolete for his own burgeoning collection, where it remains today.
    A small, manila-colored card entitled How to Teach reveals a clue to how an unconventional reference professional like Bruce might have developed his instruction skills. Look closely and you’ll notice a step-by-step list of tips for individuals who are new to the role of teacher. Produced by the U.S. War Instruction Board during WWII, it was distributed to American manufacturers charged with training unskilled labor, those people replacing regular employees who’d become involved in fighting the war itself. Bruce found this government relic during one of his favorite idylls: trolling New Jersey’s ubiquitous flea markets. He was intrigued by its no-nonsense tips, as well as the plight of U.S. companies teaching nontraditional workers the skills needed to stoke America’s war effort at home.

    Alongside all the cool tchotchkes lining Lancaster’s shelves, you’ll also find actual books—a slew of them, many offering their own insight into his life and work at Drew. Before judging them by their covers, though, take time to chat with Bruce. You’ll come away with some great stories about the library, its history and its most colorful staffer.

    This story originally appeared in Visions, The Library Newsletter, Spring 2017
     
  13. -Brent-
    Joined: Nov 20, 2006
    Posts: 6,020

    -Brent-
    Member

    @SUHRsc well said, Zach.

    On the opposite side of the spectrum, there's me. I'm not into flatheads but I like early Fords and I've messed with them a little. I'm not particularly knowledgeable about them but I do my best to search. We all know that with the Internet, there's 99 emotionally spirited wrong answers for ever 1 spot-on correct answer and to find that correct answer I've learned TWO THINGS: 1) you have to dig pretty deep and then have knowledge already to know if it's right or wrong or 2) you have to read what Bruce wrote on the topic.

    Bruce had been kind enough to help me with all sorts of things over the years and I certainly appreciate that. He will be missed.
     
  14. sdluck
    Joined: Sep 19, 2006
    Posts: 2,704

    sdluck
    Member

    I discovered the HAMB years ago and followed it for a long time without posting,esp reading Bruce's post,.I didn't think I could contribute much.I learned over the years that I did know a little,but always learned more reading Bruce's post. Never met the Man but Thank god for the HAMB so he could share his wisdom.
     
    Thor1 likes this.
  15. Saxon
    Joined: Aug 9, 2008
    Posts: 2,157

    Saxon
    Member
    from MN

    In the early days here, it wasn't always easy to ask newbie questions (lot has changed). You could always count on Bruce to not only answer them but, he would take a small interest on seeing it through. Including pms with one on one help. I know I wasn't the only one, he helped thousands. Thank you Bruce!!
     
    Thor1, OG lil E, Slick Willy and 3 others like this.
  16. Tim
    Joined: Mar 2, 2001
    Posts: 12,273

    Tim
    Member
    from KCMO

    Fuck.
     
    jim snow likes this.
  17. LOU WELLS
    Joined: Jan 24, 2010
    Posts: 2,051

    LOU WELLS
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from IDAHO

    Just A Great Guy...R.I.P.
     
  18. bct
    Joined: Apr 4, 2005
    Posts: 3,097

    bct
    Member

    Goodbye bruce. Thanks for everything.
     
  19. Mr48chev
    Joined: Dec 28, 2007
    Posts: 28,839

    Mr48chev
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    That just isn't news you wanted to see. May he rest in peace.
     
  20. Petejoe
    Joined: Nov 27, 2002
    Posts: 10,850

    Petejoe
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Zoar, Ohio

  21. Zach, that was a very fitting and heartfelt tribute to a man I always admired and listened intently to whatever he had to say, his knowledge had now boundaries, he was a wealth of information and he was free with sharing it, I remember talking with him after he lost his first wife and how devastated he was, and then he met Barbara, he started to enjoy life again.

    Bruce always responded to any question I ever set him in PM and he had the answer every single time.

    Zach, I am so sorry for you as you had the privilege to say that you were close to Bruce, regretfully I can't say that, He was my friend like so many people here that I have gotten to know through our love of old cars, and these friendships are based on mutual respect.

    I read another members post about Bruce and something he pointed out was Bruce was never condescending, I noticed that years ago and I have tried to do as the master has taught, respect goes a long way.

    Goodbye to my favorite librarian, until I see you again.HRP
     
    OG lil E and arkiehotrods like this.
  22. Jeff Norwell
    Joined: Aug 20, 2003
    Posts: 13,243

    Jeff Norwell
    MODERATOR
    Staff Member

    This board and the world has just lost an immense mountain of knowledge.When he spoke.. his words were pure wisdom.This really sucks.
    Bruce was the man.
     
    Stogy, OG lil E, Slick Willy and 7 others like this.
  23. 41rodderz
    Joined: Sep 27, 2010
    Posts: 5,390

    41rodderz
    Member
    from Oregon

    Condolences to the family .May the Good Lord bless his family with hope and strength . Amen .
     
    1Nimrod likes this.
  24. 26Troadster
    Joined: Nov 20, 2010
    Posts: 607

    26Troadster
    Member
    from Texas

    RIP Bruce, god speed
     
  25. mikew
    Joined: Oct 29, 2002
    Posts: 194

    mikew
    Member

    Well said Zach ... wish I could have met him. I learned a lot about flatheads from his writings as well.
     
  26. 100% Matt
    Joined: Aug 7, 2006
    Posts: 2,598

    100% Matt
    Member

    I am so saddened to hear of Bruce’s passing. Many times over the years he’s immense knowledge of early fords has helped me out. Godspeed Mr Lancaster!


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  27. Damn that's such a huge bummer. Bruce looked like a librarian who got lost at a car meet (for good reason) but if you asked him a question the solid knowledge that poured out left you in awe. Many times there would be a heated argument on the HAMB and then as soon as Bruce weighed in with his low key, confident writing tone everyone knew that the truth was there for them to take to the bank. As I wrote that I thought...Bruce is the perfect example for the opposite of fake news! No BS just the facts. The world is a better place for all that you learned in life and graciously passed on so willingly Bruce. Rest in eternal peace....and now you can help St. Peter out with his flathead........
     
  28. All H.A.M.B. hearts are weeping tonight.:(
     
    hotrodA, OG lil E, scarylarry and 8 others like this.

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