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History Auto racing 1894-1944

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by kurtis, Jul 18, 2009.

  1. WillyNilly
    Joined: Apr 7, 2013
    Posts: 226

    WillyNilly
    Member
    from NorCal

    Racing is dangerous.

     
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  2. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 5,370

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    20246353_10214113209492543_1519712911885771012_n.jpg Major Oats after his 1921 victory at Brooklands aboard his 11.9 H.P. Lagonda.
     
  3. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 5,370

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    20622049_1849246465404267_4900451841184808789_n.jpg 1922 Ries race Graz. "SASHA" by Ferdinand Porsche. F.R. pic
     
  4. saacha
    Joined: Mar 20, 2011
    Posts: 143

    saacha
    Member
    from cloud 9

    Ref. the SASCHA, Alfred Neubauer also raced a similar car , different number plate
     

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  5. ehdubya
    Joined: Aug 27, 2008
    Posts: 2,304

    ehdubya
    Member

  6. The 2017 Race Season has ended for us..We were plagued by intermittent valve train problems; but we avoided a DNS and a DNF at Monterey. After a visit to the pits at this, the last of the season, I rejoined to finish second from last. Unfortunately at Monterey, during the week's practices the car was running with the top five of the PreWar Groups! We've redone the whole valvetrain for next year!

    \ monterey2016(2).jpg
     
  7. THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER
    Joined: Jun 6, 2007
    Posts: 2,165

    THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER
    Member
    from FRENCHTOWN

    Old Dawg,
    Can you tell us a little bit about what you mean when you say "...running with the top five..."? Do you guys run qualifying laps, or just nerf it up in practice? I hope to join the vintage crowd some time and would like to know more about the degree of competitiveness on the track.

    Beautiful picture btw. Is that a rock face or cloud bank in the background?
     
  8. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 22,530

    The37Kid
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    ^^^^^^^^^^^^ My guess is the "Top Five" are GP Alfa Romeos and Bugattis, Peter Giddings being one of the drivers. Bob
     
  9. Good guess, Bob...Until this engine I would say: "I beat the Bugatti's and worry the Alfa's (including my friend Peter).. Up until the latter part of this season I could say that I would "beat the Alfa's (except the 35C's), the Bugatti's; and worry the ERA's.
     
  10. Depending on the sanctioning body, our starting grid for our Qualifying Race are set by our best lap times during practice. In our PreWar classes out on the West Coast there are just a few of us (Peter Giddings, of course, being one) that are driving our cars to near their (the car's) limits. We give extreme deference to those that are out on the track motoring around. Some of these machines are valued in the millions of dollars. The top finisher is not necessarily given the awards. At events like Monterey the cups go to those that put on the best all around show (including in the Paddock area).

    The photo was at Laguna Seca Raceway on the short chute between Turns Two and Three. What you seen in the background is an earth embankment!
    This award I won in 2015

    RMMR2015-2.jpg
     
  11. THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER
    Joined: Jun 6, 2007
    Posts: 2,165

    THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER
    Member
    from FRENCHTOWN

    Thanks.

    BTW - love the bow tie.
     
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  12. This is YouTube where you can see the whole Monterey racing weekend. I had to start last in Group 2A. because I had drop out of the qualifying race. Unfortunately they concentrated on the leaders.
     
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  13. noboD
    Joined: Jan 29, 2004
    Posts: 6,193

    noboD
    Member

    I am asking this question because I am confused, happens a lot. In the the newest SOSS magazine there is a very good article on the 1931 Indy race. On page 30 there is a phantom view of a rocker assembly that Fred Duesenburg designed. It shows two rollers on the rocker arm that contact the cam, one to open the valve the other to close. This would be similar to desmodromic valves, but is on the rocker instead of valve itself. Now my confusion. Say if the base circle is 1.000 the inside contact of the rollers on the cam would also be 1.000. When the opening roller hits the cam lobe wouldn't there have to be an opposing recess for the closing roller to go into? If the lift is .500 wouldn't there have to an opposing .500 recess with the same duration? Or am I not seeing something? Does anyone have any better pictures or diagrams of this setup? Thanks in advance.
     
  14. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 22,530

    The37Kid
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Brave man asking that question on a Flathead site. Bob
     
  15. ago
    Joined: Oct 12, 2005
    Posts: 2,139

    ago
    Member
    from pgh. pa.

    Can you post a photo?
     
  16. drtrcrV-8
    Joined: Jan 6, 2013
    Posts: 736

    drtrcrV-8
    Member

    And WHO made the rule that this is just "a flathead site"??? Are overhead valve/cam motors suddenly "outlawed", &, more importantly WHEN did this happen, ESPECIALLY on this site??
     
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  17. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 22,530

    The37Kid
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Sarcastic remarks are posted among friends, because most people get a kick out of them.:)(Note funny face) [​IMG]

    Bob
     
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  18. Bob may have had "A Brain Fart"! He probably thought he was on the Bangers Meet thread! LOL
     
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  19. Yeah! A lot of us don't subscribe to Yapp's SOSS. No photos, Roger Huntington in his "Design & Development of the Indy Car" tells of Fred Duesenberg developeing a cylinder head for the 260 C.I.D. Duesenberg Model A passenger car engine. The cam had special lobes that operated dual finger rockers that opened and closed the valves (like desmodromic). The standard engine could make 4000 r.p.m.. A de-stroked 240 C.I.D. engine made 4,400 r.p.m.. According to Huntington, both engines made about 140 H.P.
     
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  20. noboD
    Joined: Jan 29, 2004
    Posts: 6,193

    noboD
    Member

    '37 certainly has the right to bust my balls. After all I rode him at Hershey for half a day. I will post the drawing later tonight, I need to mow grass while the sun is still shining.
     
  21. noboD
    Joined: Jan 29, 2004
    Posts: 6,193

    noboD
    Member

    Ok, the battery was dead on the mower so I killed some stuff with the backhoe. Hopefully the picture will show. Thanks again for looking.
     

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  22. Michael Ferner
    Joined: Nov 12, 2009
    Posts: 711

    Michael Ferner
    Member

    I think I know the drawing; it's probably from a 1931 article in The Motor. If it is, then you go wrong in assuming that one roller is there to open the valve, and another to close it. In fact, the second roller is for the exhaust valve rocker, and just "shining through" in the drawing. It's drawn with a dotted line to merely show its position, while the relevant parts of the inlet rocker are in gray. The closing assist is done by a "finger" (the 1931 caption calls it a "shoe") on the underside of the rocker that looks a bit like a trigger for a gun.
     
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  23. Michael Ferner
    Joined: Nov 12, 2009
    Posts: 711

    Michael Ferner
    Member

    Well, yes, that's the same drawing. It's actually the same article, copied in a 2017 magazine??? Strange world... :rolleyes:
     
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  24. ago
    Joined: Oct 12, 2005
    Posts: 2,139

    ago
    Member
    from pgh. pa.

    It looks like the rocker arm is captured by the valve. The caption mentions a finger to help close the valve. Similar to a Desmo!
     
  25. noboD
    Joined: Jan 29, 2004
    Posts: 6,193

    noboD
    Member

    OK. so the roller on the right is not attached to the left one? That makes more sense. Thanks.
     
  26. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 22,530

    The37Kid
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    While we're on the same page is the MILLER 16 in the top photo a sister engine to the Frank Lockhart LSR Stutz Black Hawk engine?

    Bob
     
  27. Now don't go there, Old Dawg- all of my 'Bangers are OHV from the factory, and a couple (Crosley/Homelite) are OHC!!! :D
     
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  28. Michael Ferner
    Joined: Nov 12, 2009
    Posts: 711

    Michael Ferner
    Member

    Sister engine, yes, but different. The Sampson actually had two engines side by side, geared together to drive a central shaft to the flywheel/clutch assembly, while the Lockhart engine had two blocks (actually, two times two blocks) on a common crankcase with two crankshafts and a central drive shaft (A "U16" configuration). The principle is the same, but the execution different.
     
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  29. Bigcheese327
    Joined: Sep 16, 2001
    Posts: 6,512

    Bigcheese327
    Member

    Apologies if this has been asked before. I looked quickly but didn't see anything.



    Anyone know anything about the roadster shown at 1:56 in this video of the 1937 Pikes Peak Hill Climb? It's a remarkable sight among all the sprint cars.
     
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  30. Six Ball
    Joined: Oct 8, 2007
    Posts: 1,951

    Six Ball
    Member
    from Nevada

    Thank you! Whats with all the traffic he had to dodge?
     

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