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Technical Any glass cutters here?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Los_Control, Mar 30, 2017.

  1. Los_Control
    Joined: Oct 7, 2016
    Posts: 615

    Los_Control
    Member
    from TX

    Just curious what someone that has done it before thinks.
    I need all new glass in my 49 dodge pickup, and it is all flat safety glass.
    This glass is not that costly to replace, think e-bay list it for $260 + shipping, then figure out how much gets broke.
    Maybe it would be cheaper to just go to a local glass shop.
    That is my plan so far, just go to local shop.

    But I have a 51 plymouth suburban that need to part out, and has some pretty decent glass.
    Would anyone that has done this before, suggest I take the good flat safety glass from the suburban, and try to cut it myself to fit the 49 pickup?

    I have read and watched youtube articles on cutting this glass, just wonder what the success rate is for others that have tried it.
    Would you do it again?
     
  2. Cutting old glass can be iffy,go to your local glass shop. HRP
     
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  3. Hombre
    Joined: Aug 22, 2008
    Posts: 1,017

    Hombre
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    You would be much better off with all new laminated glass ( safety glass) from your local glass guy. Now with that said what do you have to loose by trying to cut what you have? I mean if you mess it up you are no worse off than before you started, and you might just learn something.
     
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  4. Jalopy Joker
    Joined: Sep 3, 2006
    Posts: 24,597

    Jalopy Joker
    Member

    shop around for a shop that has done this type of work before, with positive results - I learned the hard way about shops saying that they know how to cut automotive glass - using correct measurements/patterns
     
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  5. Sheep Dip
    Joined: Dec 29, 2010
    Posts: 1,572

    Sheep Dip
    Member
    from Central Ca

    Ordered my glass (40 Ford Coupe) from Autoglassics.
    Well packaged and fit like it was made for it......no problems.
     
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  6. clem
    Joined: Dec 20, 2006
    Posts: 2,752

    clem
    Member

    If you are shipping from a supplier,
    Chances are that they have shipped glass before and will know how to package it correctly.
    Breakages are their responsiblity ?

    I think it Depends on the type/treatment of glass as to whether it is able to be cut.
     
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  7. bct
    Joined: Apr 4, 2005
    Posts: 3,083

    bct
    Member

    I cut my own fir a 51 dodge. Just bought the rough sizes. It was a fun learning experience but it was difficult , i am lucky to have belt sanders. It was 30 bucks a side for w/s. Probably only saved 30 orc40 dollars doing it myself.
     
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  8. Gman0046
    Joined: Jul 24, 2005
    Posts: 5,976

    Gman0046
    Member

    I've only had one chopped car a 35 Chevy Standard on which the glass wasn't an issue as it was pretty straight forward 2" chop. One thing I've always thought about was that after doing all the work on an intricate chop what would you do if you couldn't get the glass right or couldn't get the glass at all. Could be a lot of wasted metal work.

    Gary
     
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  9. Los_Control
    Joined: Oct 7, 2016
    Posts: 615

    Los_Control
    Member
    from TX

    I appreciate all your answers. I think what I walk away with.
    I will try to save what flat glass I can from the parts car, but not get carried away with hours of time trying to save it.
    If it comes out easy, fine I will set it aside.
    Then when am bored, I can try cutting some and see how it goes.
    Would be the satisfaction of learning something new while re-using something you have.
     
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  10. Flat glass is easy job for any experienced cutter. You can make templates and fit them. Take those to the glass shop and in a few days you'll have your windows. You can drag the car to a shop that does the old work and they will do it exactly the same way. It's pretty straight forward and hasn't changed much throughout the years. If you want tempered glass it's the same until they send it out for tempering.

    There's conflicting opinion on using safety glass or tempered for side windows. Pretty much everyone agrees that regular plate glass is a bad idea.

    Curved glass is another animal all together. Not sure exactly how they pull that off. I do know some shops can though. I see a lot with lexan front and rear with no sides. All of the hidden details on a chop are where the majority of the work is.

    With Some chops it's as simple as not rolling the windows up as far on flat glass with straight posts The top of the pane still goes to the new top but the bottom stays deeper in the door.
     
  11. j3harleys
    Joined: May 12, 2010
    Posts: 793

    j3harleys
    Member
    from colorado

    I was a union glazier many years ago and it is easy if you know what you are doing as with anything. If you decide to do it your self be prepared to break some. I have not cut any in years , I go to local shop to get mine. It can get expensive if you mess up a couple times. And not only Is plate glass a bad idea its Very dangerous and illegal. Good luck.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2017
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  12. bct
    Joined: Apr 4, 2005
    Posts: 3,083

    bct
    Member

    The best tip I learned was to use chunks of tape measure for cutting the plastic between the layers.
     
  13. hemiboy
    Joined: Apr 21, 2005
    Posts: 249

    hemiboy
    Member

    There is a good glass guy in Kennewick, Brian Jensen. He makes medical Isotopes now but was a glass guy for 20 years. 509 845 3078. He has cut some for me and has done a great job every time. Tell him Jeff in Pasco sent you.
     
  14. Hombre
    Joined: Aug 22, 2008
    Posts: 1,017

    Hombre
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    laminated glass is mandatory or required for all Windshields today. That is the one place you can not use tempered glass. If the added expense of tempered ( and it can be an expensive addition) doesn't bother you then you can use it everywhere else Other than the windshield. Both "Tempered" and "Laminated" are safety glass, they just work in different ways. The reason Laminated is required for windshields is the fact that once it breaks you can still see through it to some extent, and unless it is a really bad break like a girder going through it something, it stays in place.

    Tempered when it breaks, breaks into thousands of little bity pieces, I am sure most everyone has seen this. Tempered can still cut you, but those little tiny pieces are less prone to cut your throat or get deep enough to sever an artery or something like that.
     
  15. KRB52
    Joined: Jul 9, 2011
    Posts: 1,004

    KRB52
    Member
    from Conneticut

    Just remember that you CAN NOT cut tempered glass. I've had to clean up a couple of messes at the hardware store I used to work in from someone bringing in a piece of glass they had at home and wanted cut down. Didn't know it was tempered until it shattered. Worst one was a piece that weighed about 20 pounds that the boss did on the work bench. He walked away, left it for me to sweep up. Thanks.
     
  16. weps
    Joined: Aug 1, 2008
    Posts: 520

    weps
    Member
    from auburn,IN

    And, believe it or not, there is a "maximum size" that the broken pieces can be. The QC people had to sample break a piece every so often, and document this (From when I worked in a glass plant)

    (cannot "cut" Glass that is already tempered)
     
  17. Years ago, I would cut laminated glass almost everyday. I did glass for UPS trucks, Case tractors, construction equipment, semi trucks, hot rods, storefront doors...etc.
    Tips on cutting laminated is have a good self oiling cutter. You want a clean cut, little oil helps for a smooth score.
    When you cut, should be continuous motion. No stopping or repositioning, so plan your cut before cutting.
    On cutting laminated, you cut one side and run (break) from the edge at the beginning of the cut. Use both hands and use a little pressure to get the glass to run. Keep the pressure on until the run goes al the way to the other edge.
    Now flip the glass over and cut as close to exactly over the cut on the other side. This is where experience takes over, cutting or tracing over the first cut precisely makes a clean break and no chips from an uneven break will fly out. Your mission is having chip free glass. Chips at edge will weaken glass and eventually break.
    After breaking both sides, conservatively pour denatured alcohol on one side of the glass and light it on fire. The alcohol and heat will soften the laminated core. Slightly bend glass downward and cut off softened core with a razor blade.
    Have fun if you want to give it a go and don't set your place on fire.
     
  18. Chuck Craig
    Joined: Jun 11, 2016
    Posts: 244

    Chuck Craig

    I would add that if you are in a radius you be very careful when bending the glass that is the cut piece as it will chip the edge of the glass where it was cut. A pair of wide bill pliers helps with this as you can pull the cut off piece out away from the good piece when it is still pliable from the heat.
     

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