Register now to get rid of these ads!

Projects Almost Funny - AWB Barracuda Funny Car Build

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by squirrel, Nov 27, 2017.

  1. dirty old man
    Joined: Feb 2, 2008
    Posts: 7,329

    dirty old man
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Jim, you can bet that when I got enough seniority to bid to a job off that spot weld job and into something better there, I did so.
    After 8 years of working there and enduring strikes, layoffs, short time, etc. they shut the second shift down for an extended layoff and I went to school to learn the machinist trade and never went back there. Best thing that ever happened to me!
     
    squirrel likes this.
  2. Fabber McGee
    Joined: Nov 22, 2013
    Posts: 507

    Fabber McGee
    Member

    You are probably already aware of this, but other guys may not be. My brother was shop foreman at a good sized sheet metal shop for 25 years and did all the machinery maintenance too. He told me that the most important thing for getting a good spot weld is to have good clamping pressure at the tips. More is better and all you can get it just barely good enough. Of course, all of his metal was new and clean, so he didn't mention cleanliness problems that we have.

    I proved his advise when I was working maintenance at the local power plant. We had an old hand held spot welder that nobody would use. Lots of comments about "POS" and "It just burns holes in anything it touches."
    Never one to take anybody else's word for things that don't work right, I gave it a try and found that it arced almost as soon as the tips hit the metal. A quick little switch adjustment so that you had to squeeze hell out of the handles before the switch energized the tips and all of a sudden it was a great tool. It was soon a favorite tool with the maintenance crew and was getting used a lot.
     
  3. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 39,482

    squirrel
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I'm making sure to shine up the metal first, and I play with the clamp adjustment to get it as tight as it needs to be. You can quickly get a feel for how it's working, by how it behaves when you first push the button....if it's loose it will spark right away, if it's right it will just hum and the orange spot will grow
     
    loudbang likes this.
  4. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 39,482

    squirrel
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Have you watched videos of the old cars being assembled? neat stuff.

    There are spot welders like that, they cost serious money, though.

    one side done.

    build07.jpg
     
    mgtstumpy, Stogy, norms30a and 5 others like this.
  5. Fabber McGee
    Joined: Nov 22, 2013
    Posts: 507

    Fabber McGee
    Member

    31Vic,
    Make your own out of one of these. Might be able to use most of the high leverage clamp. Trouble with long rods is getting good clamping pressure. Might make most of the arms from box tube and put the copper rods on the end. Depending on how long you want them, you might need to make your own high leverage clamp. Or, use a big C clamp, but that would be slow.
     
    loudbang likes this.
  6. dirty old man
    Joined: Feb 2, 2008
    Posts: 7,329

    dirty old man
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    The ones we operated on the line were air operated and water cooled, on DC current, pull the trigger and blam! verypowerful and sparks flew everywhere! Far as I know they're still used, were still in use when I returned to the car plants at Ford as a toolmaker for awhile in '77-'79 before going to airline and into jet engine and airframe parts machining.
    But I haven't forgotten how those damn sparks burned up your skin and your clothes.
     
    Floater03 likes this.
  7. DDDenny
    Joined: Feb 6, 2015
    Posts: 9,053

    DDDenny
    Member
    from oregon

    I have an import version of that deep reach clamp but with the finger end style, normally I don't use a good clamp for close welding, this one I will, what a POS.
    Now, the Vise Grip brand my friend has, they are worth the extra money.
     
  8. flatford39
    Joined: Dec 3, 2006
    Posts: 1,891

    flatford39
    Member

    I hear you. If there was a hand held spot welder with a 24" or 30" throat I would buy it. Anyone have knowledge of one???
     
  9. oldsroller
    Joined: Jan 3, 2007
    Posts: 117

    oldsroller
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from PA

    Miller sells them up to 18”, pricey though. Had a harbor freight spot welder, stepped up and bought a Miller 110 volt- I don’t regret it.
     
  10. dirty old man
    Joined: Feb 2, 2008
    Posts: 7,329

    dirty old man
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    With all the car plants that have closed up in the USA, ought to be a damn big pile of spot welders somewhere.
     
    belair likes this.
  11. ceege
    Joined: Jul 4, 2017
    Posts: 204

    ceege
    Member
    from NW MT

    loudbang likes this.
  12. blowby
    Joined: Dec 27, 2012
    Posts: 4,790

    blowby
    Member
    from Nicasio Ca


    Here's the one at my school.

    0205181601_resized.jpg
     
    Cirilian and loudbang like this.
  13. Dick Stevens
    Joined: Aug 7, 2012
    Posts: 2,112

    Dick Stevens
    Member

    The Vise Grips that were made in Dewitt, NE were but the POS Vise Grips made in China sure aren't!
     
    warbird1 and loudbang like this.
  14. dirty old man
    Joined: Feb 2, 2008
    Posts: 7,329

    dirty old man
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Quite true, Irwin Tools bought Vise Grip, and most if not all production has been moved to China.
     
    lowrd likes this.
  15. gene-koning
    Joined: Oct 28, 2016
    Posts: 698

    gene-koning
    Member

    I'll keep drilling or punching holes and plug welding, thanks. I've seen and rewelded way too many spot welds that have failed. Gene
     
  16. hotrod1948
    Joined: Jan 17, 2011
    Posts: 260

    hotrod1948
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Milton, WI

    All the body shops I worked at had welders that were 3 phase and some were powered by more than 220V.
     
    loudbang likes this.
  17. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 39,482

    squirrel
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    If you look at how car bodies are built, you'll see that the spot welds are done around the edges, and the parts are assembled in order such that the welding is always done around the edges. The flanges to be welded are carefully placed, so they can be got to easily.

    When we build hot rods, there are not many places that we can use a spot welder, because we make panels that are smaller, and need to be welded in hard to access areas.
     
    treb11, Stogy, loudbang and 1 other person like this.
  18. porknbeaner
    Joined: Sep 12, 2003
    Posts: 40,188

    porknbeaner
    Member

    They do I think Miller. We had one at the Star that we were able to spot weld larger panels for the presses. Instead of wrestling the panels you set them up on the platen and then just drug your leads around them.
     
    loudbang likes this.
  19. BJR
    Joined: Mar 11, 2005
    Posts: 4,294

    BJR
    Member
    from Minnesota

    When I worked at a body shop in the 70's we had a spot welder with two hand held guns. You held them against the panel about 2 or 3 inches apart and hit the button and got 2 spot welds each time. Now I have an Eastwood 110 volt clamp style spot welder. It works OK but not great. I has the extended long reach tongs also. The problem with the long reach tongs is, you can't get enough pressure on the ends of the tongs as they tend to bend.
     
    loudbang likes this.
  20. s55mercury66
    Joined: Jul 6, 2009
    Posts: 1,982

    s55mercury66
    Member
    from SW Wyoming

    The arms can be stiffened up a good bit by clamping some angle iron to them, but be careful not to add too much weight to them. I like the spot welds because they are much easier to clean and paint than plug welds, so I use them as much as possible.
     
    31Vicky with a hemi and loudbang like this.
  21. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 39,482

    squirrel
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    maybe you could find one of the old "how to build your own spot welder" threads and bring it back to life? :)
     
  22. Fabber McGee
    Joined: Nov 22, 2013
    Posts: 507

    Fabber McGee
    Member

    Getting a lot on here that doesn't really have much to do with an 8 second Cuda, but I'll add one more comment about a long arm spot welder then quit.
    The arms don't need to be non conductive, just insulated from the tips. Arms could be 1 x 2 box tube or similar with power cables inside and the contact tips, or original short arms from the portable spot welder attached to the outboard ends.
     
    loudbang likes this.
  23. Mike Colemire
    Joined: May 18, 2013
    Posts: 505

    Mike Colemire
    Member

    Jim, try Bullet cams when you get ready for a cam. I had one in my 582 BBC, right at 800 lift, went 2 seasons with the same springs, also had a 657 lift in a 434 street driven, solid roller, and it had over 11000 miles on it. I used the best Morel solid roller lifters in the 434, and Crower hippo in the dragster. They know their stuff and customer service is real good. Good luck on the build.
     
    loudbang likes this.
  24. Jim; you mentioned using Round tube on your rear wheel openings. I've done that many times. On my last job I use 1/2" X 1" .035 Rectangle tube and found it much easier to shape, hold in place and weld. It didn't want to kink or wrinkle at all while shaping and held it's shape while welding. Round tube seems to want to walk around and difficult to clamp to. Food for thought.
    The Wizzard
     
    loudbang, Doctorterry and Gammz like this.
  25. choptop40
    Joined: Dec 23, 2009
    Posts: 2,849

    choptop40
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Hey Wizzard ...thanks for the tech....
     
    Pist-n-Broke and loudbang like this.
  26. rd martin
    Joined: Nov 14, 2006
    Posts: 1,803

    rd martin
    Member
    from indiana

    nice idea on the wheel openings! how did you bend it? looks nice. i have a project that needs that.
     
  27. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 39,482

    squirrel
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    That is a neat way to do it. Not sure if it's crude enough for my build, though :)

    I have been cleaning up the rear end housing, getting ready to cut the tubes. I'm still doing the figuring to decide how wide to make it. I probably want to center the pinion. And I need to decide the driveline angle. I'm thinking about how high to mount the engine/trans.
     
  28. 1934coupe
    Joined: Feb 22, 2007
    Posts: 2,855

    1934coupe
    Member

    Remember Jim not more than 24" from cl of crank to the ground.

    Pat
     
    loudbang likes this.
  29. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 39,482

    squirrel
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    heh...yeah, I have that one in mind! I expect it will be well under 24".
     
    loudbang likes this.

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2013 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.