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Technical 57 ford 9inch rear

Discussion in 'Traditional Hot Rods' started by old chevy nut, Jun 19, 2017.

  1. old chevy nut
    Joined: Nov 22, 2010
    Posts: 112

    old chevy nut
    Member
    from va

    can someone tell me whats the difference in a 57 ford 9in and a 59 ford 9in or are they the same?
     
  2. Roger O'Dell
    Joined: Jan 21, 2008
    Posts: 851

    Roger O'Dell
    Member

    When I was into 32 roadsters the 57 center appeared as a globe or ball cut in half , nice round smooth looking. Later years had shapes formed, also the 57 ranchero ha a larger piñon bearing. Don't know anything about the 59.
     
  3. If they're both out of full size cars, (not wagons or Rancheros) nothing dimension wise, the 57's had the smooth housing, (no dimples) and are the ones most everyone wants.
     
  4. gimpyshotrods
    Joined: May 20, 2009
    Posts: 13,596

    gimpyshotrods
    Member

    '58-'59 had two dimples, and a flat strip over the ring gear.

    The first few years were not quite 9", so they are ever so slightly weaker than later ones. I cannot remember when this ended.
     
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  5. oj
    Joined: Jul 27, 2008
    Posts: 5,456

    oj
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Good to know that Gimpy. Is the bolt pattern the same as 9" and enough room to put regular 9" stuff in it or do you need to replace the carrier?
     
  6. gimpyshotrods
    Joined: May 20, 2009
    Posts: 13,596

    gimpyshotrods
    Member

    I believe that it all fits, so long as the ring and pinion match.
     
    oj likes this.
  7. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 37,417

    squirrel
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    there are small and large bearing end versions. I had both, sold the small one, the large one is in my Chevy II. works ok, but it did crack after a while...I added a strap across the back....probably not a problem if you have a more normal engine than mine.
     
  8. partsdawg
    Joined: Feb 12, 2006
    Posts: 1,733

    partsdawg
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Minnesota

    IIRC the main issue was a lack of brake shoe area. 2" or so.The remedy was to use '63-'64 shoes which were wider.....
    2 +1/2.I also heard it was tough to get a parts kit for them.Pins,springs and such. That was years ago when I was selling every one I could find. Maybe it's gotten better so correct me if I'm wrong.
     
  9. old chevy nut
    Joined: Nov 22, 2010
    Posts: 112

    old chevy nut
    Member
    from va

    thanks guys i have a 59 9in im thinking of using in my 33 ford pickup
     
  10. Atwater Mike
    Joined: May 31, 2002
    Posts: 7,605

    Atwater Mike
    Member

    Mainly depends on width of housing, as 9" are all quite sturdy. Jim Forbes' ('Squirrel') Chevy ll is an extreme example.
    I cracked one in '62, in my '46 with the old Joe Reath 331 Chrysler. 1:1 ratio 6-71, but I drove it like a gorilla.
    My '60 F100 rear has been in my '55 F100 for 40 years, (big bearing) never a problem pulling boats, hauling 2 Hemis at a time, my tool box, (!) and various other shop 'chores'.
    Did a 13.60 run at Baylands in '82, thru mufflers and street tires. So, it ran 'good', too.
    Love my 9"...er, 'axle'.
     
  11. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 37,417

    squirrel
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    The brakes can be fun...the wagon rears with the large bearings also have slightly wider brakes, but I think they're 2" instead of 1.75? I put Chevy drums on mine, with custom aftermarket axles.
     
  12. Sweet & Low
    Joined: Feb 13, 2014
    Posts: 167

    Sweet & Low
    Member

    What does the 59 measure from drum face to drum face. I know the 57 in narrow, not sure about the 59
     
    old crank likes this.
  13. Two door and four doors used the 1.375 OD wheel bearing areas on the axle shafts. RW207CCRA bearing, 9568 seal inside the axle tube.
    Wagons and Rancheros used the 1.500 OD wheel bearing areas. 88128RA wheel bearings with 51098 seals in the axle tubes.
    If the axle shafts have slight rust pitting, torch, wear damage at the seal area, a guy can make the corresponding repair sleeve fit over the axle for a new seal surface after installing the bearing and retainer.
    The biggest oddity that I have seen on the very early '57 9" rears, is the use of an odd large OD pinion seal that I don't know the part number of. All of the stock later rearends, to the end in about 1986, use the common 7044NA pinion seal.
    As far as brake parts go on the car rearends asked about, good luck.
    I will give you a handy tip that I learned the hard way. Have your axle shafts checked for straight between centers on a lathe before you commit to using them. I have had to replace both of mine in the rearend I'm using in my A because of whatever had happened to the rearend that became the donor for my hotrod. I believe both had been twisted, because I twisted one off during an ill advised excursion.
     
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  14. fiftyv8
    Joined: Mar 11, 2007
    Posts: 3,913

    fiftyv8
    Member
    from CO & WA

    From my recollections the 1959 9" diff measures flange to flange 53 1/2" and drum to drum 58"
    The long axle is 30 (or might be 30 1/2)" long and the short is 26" long.
    The 9" diff is famous/popular for having a 3 bearing supported pinion and a wide point of contact between the crown wheel and pinion gears.
    The weakness of the 9" diff that seems to occur in general use is that they can crack around the welds where the tubes meet the center housing.
    It seems to be one of the most common issues with them.
    If the diff is a wide say F100 style this cracking can be due to hauling very heavy loads for obvious reasons.
    However, I also believe that hard driving can cause those same welds to break/crack due to heavy acceleration and the bending effect cause by the wheels making traction and wanting to bend housing at the center portion.

    It is not that the welds break but the metal cracks along side the welds generally...

    Hence what experience Squirrel had is an exaggerated version of what I have just mentioned and his solution is was to add extra support to reduce that bending effect.
    The center portion is quite strong and so the first weak spot near to the center is where the tubes are welded to the center round housing.
    It is quite common to see this type of support installed in big HP cars.
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2017
    j-jock likes this.
  15. manyolcars
    Joined: Mar 30, 2001
    Posts: 6,912

    manyolcars

    Sorry but the rear brake shoes for Ford pickups are the same from 1948 to 1966 and are 1 3/4". Maybe you thinking of passenger cars?
     
  16. DDDenny
    Joined: Feb 6, 2015
    Posts: 7,145

    DDDenny
    Member
    from oregon

    I seriously doubt you'll crack (or bend) a housing out of a 57 F-100.
    Non welded tubes with 5/16" wall thickness.

    20170326_094304.jpg
     
  17. fiftyv8
    Joined: Mar 11, 2007
    Posts: 3,913

    fiftyv8
    Member
    from CO & WA

    I owned a 9" with the welded tubes that broke, so no doubt at all...
    The wider the diff the more leverage that can be applied with a load.
    I do understand your point with the fully stamped housing, that is a slightly different scenario.
     
  18. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 37,417

    squirrel
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    this is where mine cracked. The yellow is magnaflux powder, the red outline is where it was cracked.

    [​IMG]

    and the brace I used to prevent it moving around so much. Haven't had any issues with it since, been a couple years.

    [​IMG]
     
    kadillackid likes this.
  19. 57 300
    Joined: Jan 1, 2010
    Posts: 224

    57 300
    Member
    from Mn.

    57 to 59 are the same except for bearing size.Wagons,Retractable's and Ranchero's have the preferred larger bearings.
     
    warbird1 likes this.
  20. This is a '59 rear housing. This takes the smaller axle bearing (2 3/8") since it had a 6. The V8 cars and wagons had the 2 1/2" axle bearings... or so I have read.
    41517-008.JPG
     
  21. fiftyv8
    Joined: Mar 11, 2007
    Posts: 3,913

    fiftyv8
    Member
    from CO & WA

    Jim, I had one crack in the exact same place.
    I think sometime guys grind the welds down to get a clean look, but forget that this is not really going to work strength wise.
     

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