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Technical 3D printing has a place in hot rodding...

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by SDS, Oct 27, 2021.

  1. SDS
    Joined: Apr 28, 2011
    Posts: 419

    SDS
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    PXL_20211027_171920176.jpg PXL_20211027_171931148~2.jpg PXL_20211027_180930984.jpg PXL_20211027_180800490.jpg In thinking about and seeing all of the different ways guys have on here to set up their steering columns (anywhere from hanging the column on nylon tie down straps, to wire shirt hangers), I figured I'd come up with an easier and more precise way to do it.
    I have a 3D printer at home and figured I could utilize that. I started by measuring the thickness of the flange under my dash (0.75 in) and the angle of the dangle (approximately 82°) then used SolidWorks CAD software to create a solid model and convert it to an STL. It's now 3D printing while I'm doing something else on the car (I have to take the firewall out anyways to mock up the column).
    Keep in mind that this is not a facsimile of my actual column drop - I intend to use one from Limeworks. This is only a fixture that I can clamp to the bottom of the firewall and stick my steering column through to determine if a 5-inch drop is what I want. T
    he large triangular shaped hole is so that the wiring harness can pass through.
    More pictures to follow when it's finished printing (19 hours)
    View attachment 5213695 View attachment 5213696
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2021
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  2. bill gruendeman
    Joined: Jun 18, 2019
    Posts: 619

    bill gruendeman
    Member

    What’s a whole lot better than my CAD program (cardboard aided design), I say if you have the tools use them to make life easier.
     
  3. KevKo
    Joined: Jun 25, 2009
    Posts: 786

    KevKo
    Member
    from Motown

    I believe Welder Series has some 3D printed stuff. Knobs, lenses, etc.
     
  4. SDS
    Joined: Apr 28, 2011
    Posts: 419

    SDS
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I'm happy to share the STL file with anyone that is interested in printing one themselves... If you wanted to try a four-inch drop, all you have to do is put a spacer in there - I'll probably create a model to 3D print that as well.
     

  5. 5window
    Joined: Jan 29, 2005
    Posts: 8,812

    5window
    Member

    I like it, but I also find it strange that the HAMB which has traditionally scorned anything made from "billet" can now embrace 3D printing. Times sure change, :)
     
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  6. raaf
    Joined: Aug 27, 2002
    Posts: 676

    raaf
    Member

    I'm sure everyone has an opinion (and no one asked for mine)...but I think it's all about the outcome. Billet looks like crap. Bad outcome.

    Behind the scenes there is a lot of modern technology in play on the HAMB. There are some very talented CAD/Solidworks folks on this site. I see these new tools as just another dimension to resourcefulness and doing whatever it takes to keep our cars on the road, or building your vision of what your car should be.

    Also, 3D prints can make for excellent casting forms. I imagine at some point we'll start seeing models for obsolete parts trade hands.

    But again it's about the balance of having one foot in the now and the other in the past.
     
  7. CJ101
    Joined: Apr 20, 2021
    Posts: 39

    CJ101
    Member

    I found the 3D printer quite handy for mocking up too. The most recent one was pie cuts for an exhaust downpipe on a tight fit in my 51 Ford shoebox. I glued them together with crazy glue and it worked great. I just then copied the pie cuts in the aluminized steel. Like Bill above, I do use the cardboard a lot too! On the exhaust project I bought cardboard mailing tubes at Staples and old amazon boxes to mock up an exhaust and muffler setup (along with the 3D pie cuts). That way I ordered the minimum parts from Lyell's. Also I have made a few 3D printed floor grommets with TPU that I'm real happy with.

    upload_2021-10-27_19-0-54.png
     
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  8. glrbird
    Joined: Dec 20, 2010
    Posts: 581

    glrbird
    Member

    Some where on here, a guy made a waterfall dash trim for his car from a 3D printer, and had it chromed over the plastic. Looked great and he was thinking of making them for sale.
     
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  9. glrbird
    Joined: Dec 20, 2010
    Posts: 581

    glrbird
    Member

    Search “35 Ford waterfall” it looks great.
     
    raven likes this.
  10. CJ101
    Joined: Apr 20, 2021
    Posts: 39

    CJ101
    Member

    upload_2021-10-27_19-22-59.png
     
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  11. Kevin Pharis
    Joined: Aug 22, 2020
    Posts: 305

    Kevin Pharis

    Here is a banger intake manifold from a 3D printed sand mold. It’s not age that makes old car parts look old... it’s the style! Style the part correctly, and don’t tell em how it was made;)

    0A1EF45B-B0EF-4DA9-9432-8AD6D0645C21.jpeg 5ED7A12D-5D61-42DA-A86A-569E7AE5E94E.jpeg EF5056D1-AF61-426A-8F37-3B2F6D049FEA.jpeg 1F72D83C-1E99-4021-B85D-AEB629AE2721.jpeg
     
  12. SEAAIRE354
    Joined: Sep 7, 2015
    Posts: 430

    SEAAIRE354
    Member

    Correct me if I’m wrong but if we’re supposed to be traditional in building these cars wouldn’t mig welders,plasma cutters , base clear paint and so on be off topic? I love the idea. One of these days I’m gonna have to teach myself solid works and try the whole 3D printer thing.
     
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  13. SDS
    Joined: Apr 28, 2011
    Posts: 419

    SDS
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Keep in mind - It's a fixture that's going to end up in the garbage can, Not an actual part that's going to live on my car
     
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  14. SDS
    Joined: Apr 28, 2011
    Posts: 419

    SDS
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    That's awesome... There's also 3D printers now that print wax patterns for investment casting... I've seen some pretty cool parts come out of that process and they can look very vintage. I think Jay Leno does that often when he restores some of his obsolete cars
     
    continentaljohn likes this.
  15. I used mine a while back to create bead roller profiles. It was a proof of concept that turned pretty well. It also forced me to learn some new stuff, which was pretty cool, even if a it tedious at times.


    [​IMG]
     
  16. Kevin Pharis
    Joined: Aug 22, 2020
    Posts: 305

    Kevin Pharis

    Some kinds of PLA can be 3D printed for investment casting, as an alternative to the wax. The wax is fairly unstable and does not provide good results for large unsupported designs. The PLA is better... but apparently doesn’t burn out of the mold as clean. The printed sand turned out awesome! Hardest part was finding someone to do it...:eek:
     
  17. PotvinV8
    Joined: Mar 30, 2009
    Posts: 229

    PotvinV8
    Member

    That Banger intake is amazing!

    I too use 3D printing technology to suss out ideas, etc. that would normally be cost prohibitive to model and machine out of aluminum for R&D purposes. One case in point is the pitman arm for a Schroeder steering box setup. I want to make sure we get the geometry correct before making any chips and the 3D printer allows us to make a mock-up part and check bump steer, steering ratio, clearance, and aesthetics before the actual part is made from aluminum. Changes can be made on the fly and a new part printed up in a couple hours until we're happy with the design, then the file is sent off to the CNC.

    The term "billet aluminum" is technically incorrect, at least in the way it's been used in the "aftermarket". In layman's terms, it refers to a solid chunk of aluminum, hence the "billet" term when a block of aluminum was placed in a CNC mill and machined down to a rear view mirror, for example. Simply put, it's a part made from a solid chunk of aluminum. I've machined many aluminum parts that wouldn't be considered "billet", but technically are. If you've ever machined something from a piece of aluminum round stock in a lathe, you've crafted a "billet aluminum" part.
     

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  18. rpm56
    Joined: Nov 29, 2013
    Posts: 89

    rpm56
    Member

    Mig and tig go back to the 1940's.
     
  19. Kevin Pharis
    Joined: Aug 22, 2020
    Posts: 305

    Kevin Pharis

    Well put! Many are unwilling to accept a “billet” part under any circumstances. “Billet” is a style of arguably ugly products from the 80’s that has tainted the world of cars forever. Parts cut from solid bar has been a staple of racing since the dawn of the automobile. Cranks, rods, and cams all cut from solid bar, none of these considered “billet”
     
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  20. Bikelessbill
    Joined: Oct 1, 2013
    Posts: 120

    Bikelessbill
    Member

    Wow. All I did was mention the wrong decade about an intake and it got my posts deleted.
     
  21. Mo rust
    Joined: Mar 11, 2012
    Posts: 587

    Mo rust
    Member

    A friend of mine made the 35 Ford waterfall after borrowing my real one. He even had it chromed and it really looks nice.
     
  22. cfmvw
    Joined: Aug 24, 2015
    Posts: 929

    cfmvw
    Member

    Starting to see 3D printed metal as well. There was a video I watched awhile back where an intake manifold was designed in Solidworks and printed with laser-sintered aluminum. Required very little machining when it was done. Probably a very expensive process, but as the technology gets better and more mainstream it will become more affordable.
     
  23. Bigmac48
    Joined: Apr 3, 2017
    Posts: 551

    Bigmac48
    Member
    from Dundalk Md

    If I had one ,new how to use it, and needed something custom or unavailable or something I couldn't find I'd use it . We are suppose to get a little wiser with age ,that's a good thing, but mainly because technology doesn't interest me I still have trouble with things like Facebook , Messenger ,phones , etc. A little behind the times . " 3D ? I thought that was those weird movies ".
     
  24. 5window
    Joined: Jan 29, 2005
    Posts: 8,812

    5window
    Member

    Glad I stirred that pot. To be clear, I am not criticizing billet or the new technology processes. There is some amazing stuff being created,especially in biomedical engineering-imagine printing out a fully compatible, functioning kidney for someone.
     
  25. indyjps
    Joined: Feb 21, 2007
    Posts: 4,913

    indyjps
    Member

    Machined aluminum parts are OK, just takes so long to prep them.
    - Grind on them to give some contour
    - radius all the edges
    - blast them to give a rough finish
    - etch them
    - heat, drip oil on them to make stains.

    Be so much easier if I could just get a cast part, the CNC guy wasted so much time making it look pretty.
     
  26. Kevin Pharis
    Joined: Aug 22, 2020
    Posts: 305

    Kevin Pharis

    As I said before... if the part was designed with the era style in mind, the part won’t need any of this prep work to look “right”... aside from the oil stains that is;)
     
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  27. PotvinV8
    Joined: Mar 30, 2009
    Posts: 229

    PotvinV8
    Member

    I think that's the ticket! In the '80s when Lil John Buttera machined the first "billet" mirror, everybody took that "blocky" design and the trend stuck. But there's absolutely no reason a part couldn't be designed and CNC machined to look more like a casting or a forging. That's exactly what I'll be doing with the pitman arm once I finalize everything. Turns out the diameter and spline count on the sector shaft is the same as a Schroeder torsion bar, so I will order a plain aluminum torsion arm from Speedway and send that along with the final CAD drawing out to be machined.
     

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  28. 57tailgater
    Joined: Nov 22, 2008
    Posts: 761

    57tailgater
    Member
    from Georgia

    I could see where this may have a good potential. Anyone have a recommendation on a printer printer and model?
     
  29. CNC-Dude
    Joined: Nov 23, 2007
    Posts: 985

    CNC-Dude
    Member

    To blow everyone's mind and create that "ah hell" moment, Kong Jackson's 2 pc. aluminum Flathead Ford heads were billet in the sense they were milled from solid blanks of aluminum plate or bar stock on a manual milling machine. They just didn't call it billet back in the 50's....
     
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  30. CNC-Dude
    Joined: Nov 23, 2007
    Posts: 985

    CNC-Dude
    Member

    Roller cams were billet back when Chet Herbert made the first one back in the 50's. Parts for engines have been made from billet in the aircraft industry since the 40's, that's where guys like Crower and Isky and many others got the idea to create some of their products once they returned from serving in the military after WWII. "Billet" goes way back, it just wasn't called that until more modern times.
     
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