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Customs 283 ENGINE

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Mister E., Feb 27, 2020.

  1. Blues4U
    Joined: Oct 1, 2015
    Posts: 4,750

    Blues4U
    Member
    from So Cal

    This is what I would do too, though I might up the diameter of the pipes to 2 1/4" to the muffler, 2" from the mufflers back to the bumper. Taking it all the way to the bumper is really key to avoid droning inside. This would give a very nice mellow tone, not loud, but free flowing, avoiding that "whoooooosh" sound of a stock heavily muffled car, but not annoying or obnoxious. You would still enjoy quiet country roads and not scare animals, unless you were putting your foot into it and hauling ass, but just cruising along it would be mellow and sound great, you'd hardly hear it inside.
     
  2. Mister E.
    Joined: May 4, 2018
    Posts: 474

    Mister E.
    Member
    from USA

    That sounds good. As it is right now I keep having to adjust the manifold studs in the block of the I6 nous they keep loosening for some reason. I've even double nutted the flange to control that part, but now the manifold is leaking by. (Sucks!)
     
  3. Mister E.
    Joined: May 4, 2018
    Posts: 474

    Mister E.
    Member
    from USA

    Good to know, thank you.
    Now to figure out what I will need for a Y pipe
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2020
  4. Mimilan
    Joined: Jun 13, 2019
    Posts: 593

    Mimilan
    Member

    Sorry I deleted that post as it was replying to the wrong post.
    On a stock 57 Chevy the RH pipe runs around the front of the engine and the LH side tees into it.

    It is a terrible system. seen here.
    upload_2020-6-3_15-28-53.png

    On our car we set it up like dual exhausts at the front. The R/H pipe crossed over between the bellhousing and the transmission . this gives adequate ground clearance .


    Where the 2 pipes merge we used a 90 deg bend and spliced it in smoothly to the L/H pipe.
    If you want to save $$$ [as We all overspend] Use your existing exhaust from the muffler back.

    A screaming 235 would probably push more air down the exhaust than a higher geared 283
     
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  5. Mister E.
    Joined: May 4, 2018
    Posts: 474

    Mister E.
    Member
    from USA

    Makes sense being 235 has to rev higher than a 283 to do anything.

    As far as exhaust, are there any Y pipes ready made, like I know they have for 350 and 400, or would I need to have a Y pipe fabricated?

    Also, I noticed you mentioned thats for a 57 chev, and I know for some parts even a year off makes a difference. Since mine is a 58 I'm wondering about that.
     
  6. Mister E.
    Joined: May 4, 2018
    Posts: 474

    Mister E.
    Member
    from USA


    I saw one of those online for sale, was wondering about that and if I should go for it or steer clear of it.
    Anyway, I have a single straight pipe here trying to match it up to 1 of the manifolds and have been thinking of getting another one and starting the exhaust with 2 straight pipes and merge them into one behind the engine/trans.
    I don't have a diagram to show what I mean, but merge the 2 pipes at the cross member for the trans and then run a single straight pipe to the existing pipe that I already have setup with brand new muffler that I recently put on going all the way out the back to bumper.

    Btw, Good morning everybody.
     
  7. Mister E.
    Joined: May 4, 2018
    Posts: 474

    Mister E.
    Member
    from USA

    Well, here we go... Not to go off topic much but, I decided today that the whole dually thing just isn't working. So I went to salvage yard and got a couple 16" singles put on and now it's got a bit of bounce to her ass end.
    Is this normal?
    Just wondering, as I am also looking at a long-bed, and the dually setup just won't work.
    Plus, I think I like it better as a single wheeler, easier on rubber as well as fuel cost.
    Just not 100% about it yet.

    Any questions, comments, input welcome.
    Thanks
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2020
  8. Mister E.
    Joined: May 4, 2018
    Posts: 474

    Mister E.
    Member
    from USA

    **UPDATE** Just got back from machine shop, the engine kit arrived, now the guy said he is waiting on the "springs" to match up with the cam.

    I would think they'd be in the kit, unless they're sold separately. (To me that doesn't make sense), but what do I know?
    Anyway, should be done pretty soon I should hope!
    Also, he did as I suggested an only bored .30 over, said it cleaned up real nice.
     
  9. jimmy six
    Joined: Mar 21, 2006
    Posts: 6,675

    jimmy six
    Member

    If your going to tow I’d install the cam with at least a 6* advance. You can still buy a button kit to do when you install the gears and chain. I’ve put a 6 in most cams I’ve installed for the street and been very lucky when checking them most were within 1/2 degree when ground.
     
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  10. Ericnova72
    Joined: May 1, 2007
    Posts: 401

    Ericnova72
    Member

    Valvesprings don't typically come in any engine rebuild "kit". Other than valvestem seals and valvecover gaskets most everything in a "full rebuild kit" is for the short block.

    Valvesprings get matched to cam choice, so the correct spring is nearly impossible to spec for a standardized rebuild"kit".

    Cams typically get ordered separately for the same reason.
     
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  11. Mister E.
    Joined: May 4, 2018
    Posts: 474

    Mister E.
    Member
    from USA

    Ok. Thanks. See I learned something new already.
     
  12. Mister E.
    Joined: May 4, 2018
    Posts: 474

    Mister E.
    Member
    from USA


    What is a button kit?

    And is it possible to set the advance after it's installed?
    I'm not the one doing the rebuild, as I am paying the machine shop for that.

    I would assume he would know this stuff already. Especially since I have told him repeatedly that I need torque for towing and speed when not towing.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2020
  13. Mimilan
    Joined: Jun 13, 2019
    Posts: 593

    Mimilan
    Member

    A button kit is offset buttons that locate over the camshaft dowel to set the cam.
    For a street car use a multiple keyway timing gear set [Cloyes]

    But personally , just install the cam "straight-up". The cam grinders have already done that for you.
    I have only ever needed to advance the cam on one race engine
     
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  14. Mister E.
    Joined: May 4, 2018
    Posts: 474

    Mister E.
    Member
    from USA


    Ok. Thank you.
     
  15. Ericnova72
    Joined: May 1, 2007
    Posts: 401

    Ericnova72
    Member

    Camshaft timing Degree Bushing kit, not button kit....a cam button is a different thing. It is fitted between the end of the cam and the timing cover to limit forward movement of the camshaft.
     
  16. Mimilan
    Joined: Jun 13, 2019
    Posts: 593

    Mimilan
    Member

    I know that! I was just referring to the dialogue and questions previously posted [assuming it was local jargon] . I've known them to be called an "offset dowel kit"
    A cam button [the real ones] are only needed on roller lifter cams
     
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  17. lippy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2006
    Posts: 4,768

    lippy
    Member
    from Ks

    Wrong they are a worthwhile thing to have on a flat tappet also. But you must weld a tab on the timing cover for the button, which has a bearing in it. It rides against the timing cover. The flat piece welded in the timing cover is to keep the button from wearing through the cover. But I knew you knew that. But he didn't. lol. Lippy
     
  18. Mimilan
    Joined: Jun 13, 2019
    Posts: 593

    Mimilan
    Member

    On a street SBC ??? I doubt it. [unless a cam grinder F***s it up totally]
    Millions of Chevy engines don't have them.
    The cam lobes are ground on a slight taper to help spin the lifters, and they also thrust the cam rearward so the cam timing gear is against the block face.

    Using a timing light with a flat tappet cam engine is easy, but with a roller cam you can get slight cam walk which shows on the timing marks.[We've been there, we usually give the throttle a quick rap! to time it]

    For the OP with a basic bolt together street engine, he doesn't need to use dowels to degree the cam or use thrust buttons.


    Although there can be exceptions to the norm, every single aftermarket cam we've degree'd was exactly as the manufacturer/grinder claimed.[A first time builder could simply bolt it in]
    we've only ever advanced a cam, to alter the working range of the engine. If the OP buys the correct cam for his intended usage, he won't need to advance it at all.
     
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  19. Mister E.
    Joined: May 4, 2018
    Posts: 474

    Mister E.
    Member
    from USA

    Thank you everybody. As stated in earlier post I am not putting it together. I began this as a self rebuild, but when I discovered a couple things that I could not quite fix myself I decided to let a machine shop have at it to clean it up and check it over.
    They said that it looked good as far as I got, and could understand as being a first timer to want it checked.

    I decided to let them bore it, clean it up and rebuild it to save time and just wait patiently to have a completely running correctly timed fully assembled engine that is drop in turn-key ready.

    I appreciate everybody's knowledge and input. You have all been great help to me.
    There is a lot that I do not know (yet) and I will learn as I continue to go.
    I know I still have a ways to go, once it is finished I still have to install it and wire it up. Also I need a clutch assembly.

    Someone said before in earlier post that the clutch on my 235 (currently in the truck) will swap out and work.
    I am not sure about this, so if anyone has knowledge of this with proven facts would be very appreciated.
    Otherwise I need to know what to look for for a clutch, flywheel etc.
    Thanks again everybody.

    ~Eric
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2020
  20. jimmy six
    Joined: Mar 21, 2006
    Posts: 6,675

    jimmy six
    Member

    Miss spoke as politicians say. Your correct. I’ve done it in the vehicle after the cam was installed straight up and the performance lagged a bit off the line in a pickup my son had. It was easier to change/drill the cam sprocket than remove the crank gear.
     
  21. Mister E.
    Joined: May 4, 2018
    Posts: 474

    Mister E.
    Member
    from USA

    **UPDATE**

    Just spoke to the machine shop, the guy said my 283 will be ready next week.

    They primed it already and going to paint it black.

    He said they already got the camshaft bearings and frost plugs in, now working on crank, pistons/and rods, as well as pushrods and all the other stuff.
    I'm not going to itemize it all.

    Anyway, so I should get it back next week he said and then I'll be able to start the install process. Woohoo!
     
  22. lippy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2006
    Posts: 4,768

    lippy
    Member
    from Ks

    Crap, I was wrong again. Lippy
     
  23. Mister E.
    Joined: May 4, 2018
    Posts: 474

    Mister E.
    Member
    from USA

    ??
     
  24. redo32
    Joined: Jul 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,673

    redo32
    Member

    Chevy engines are supposed to be painted Chevrolet Orange. Especially 283's !!
     
  25. Mister E.
    Joined: May 4, 2018
    Posts: 474

    Mister E.
    Member
    from USA

    Hmm, ok.
     
  26. Mimilan
    Joined: Jun 13, 2019
    Posts: 593

    Mimilan
    Member

    58 passenger car 283 orange
    58 light duty truck 283 grey or green
    Grey would be most correct for his [as a matching numbers restoration]

    The radial tyres wouldn't be correct either, but who cares
     
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  27. Mister E.
    Joined: May 4, 2018
    Posts: 474

    Mister E.
    Member
    from USA

    Exactly, "who cares?" it's not like the engine is going to be a show piece 24/7.

    Since it's a rebuilt motor, I would think black (or any color I like) would look sharper than truck grey or car orange..
    Since it's a TRUCK I don't want orange!

    That's my opinion, and in the end that's what matters is what I think and how I like it!
     
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  28. Mimilan
    Joined: Jun 13, 2019
    Posts: 593

    Mimilan
    Member

    Just like our 57 Chevy.
    When we rebuilt the engine, we fitted small port 265 heads and 2 barrel intake to the 283 [I have the originals in my ceiling]
    This was the opposite thinking to the "Bigger is better" chest thumping neanderthal approach.
    The engine is a "high velocity fuel feeder" with manners like a diesel. It pulls hard just off the throttle.

    If we want to scream an engine, there is our race car for that!

    People always build an engine that satisfies there ego 10% of the time [but they pay the price the other 90% of the time]
     
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  29. Mister E.
    Joined: May 4, 2018
    Posts: 474

    Mister E.
    Member
    from USA


    That's why I explained right from the start at the machine shop of what I want and why,
    I need it built for climbing hills/ Mountains and not at a crawl. I want to cruise at highway speeds when needed and to be able to tow a camper from time to time.
    I don't need a screaming high rpm engine, I want something to enjoy driving that's nice and quiet, and also useable as a daily driver.

    So that's what I expect for the money I'm spending.
     
    Mimilan likes this.
  30. Mister E.
    Joined: May 4, 2018
    Posts: 474

    Mister E.
    Member
    from USA

    Also, my intake is the oem 2bbl.

    I'm hoping that while they have my engine that they will clean up the 2bbl carb and make sure it functions as well.

    Not sure if that's normally included in an engine rebuild or not.
    But I guess will see
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2020

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