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235's and Powerglides

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by WasteGate, May 5, 2008.

  1. WasteGate
    Joined: Apr 1, 2007
    Posts: 21

    WasteGate
    Member
    from Houston

    I want to mount a Powerglide to my 57 chevy truck. In the 50's this was an option on most cars from what I understand. I currently own a powerglide and I know there are adapters out there but I wanted to ask a question before I spend any money.
    So the question is:
    Was an adapter plate used or was there a special transmission that mounted to the 235 that was called a Powerglide.

    As always, thanks for the insight!

    Preston
     
  2. FastLivin
    Joined: Sep 26, 2007
    Posts: 44

    FastLivin
    Member

    There was more than one version of the powerglide. The old version will bolt to the 235.
    [​IMG]
     
  3. magnet
    Joined: Jul 15, 2002
    Posts: 852

    magnet
    Member

    Yup .. old cast iron ones will bolt up.. I have a '62 powerglide and 235 combo in my partspile.
     
  4. 53sled
    Joined: Jul 5, 2005
    Posts: 5,820

    53sled
    Member
    from KCMO

    the old ones are not the same, and are HEAVY. if you are going to buy a $350 adapter, you might as well get an od automatic so you can DRIVE the truck. .02
     
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  5. Snarl
    Joined: Feb 16, 2007
    Posts: 1,640

    Snarl
    Member

    You will need to use an iron powerglide from a '50-62 235. The 53-up are better. All iron 'glides had what you could call an adapter ring from the factory (both L6 and V8), but iron 'glides from a V8 will NOT work behind a 235.
    When they started making them in aluminum, they incorporated the V8 bellhousing pattern into the tranny, rather than use an adapter ring. These don't work with a 216/235/261 engine without an aftermarket adapter ($350)designed to use the later trannies with the 235 engine, in which case you would be better off going with a 700-R4, especially if you are still using the stock 3:90 rearend.
     
  6. 1951bomber
    Joined: Jun 4, 2007
    Posts: 276

    1951bomber
    Member
    from atwater Ca

    get rid of that crapy powerglide go with a 350 automatic or a 3 speed
     
  7. WasteGate
    Joined: Apr 1, 2007
    Posts: 21

    WasteGate
    Member
    from Houston

    I have the orig 3 speed in the truck now with 3.38:1 gear in it right now and can cruise at 70 no problem. Couple reasons for the change are:
    Shifting in Houston Traffic SUX
    SWMBO is wanting to drive it more.
    I was wanting to swap to something period correct.
    Thanks
    Preston
     
  8. 325w
    Joined: Feb 18, 2008
    Posts: 5,177

    325w
    Member
    from texas

    You better listen to the guys. They speak the truth. Use a more modern trans. You know later they will say " I told you so". I had a perfectly good pglide and sent it to the junk yard.
     
  9. 53sled
    Joined: Jul 5, 2005
    Posts: 5,820

    53sled
    Member
    from KCMO

    My t5 may not be period correct, but I can go fast.
     
  10. heavymetal01
    Joined: Jun 12, 2013
    Posts: 3

    heavymetal01
    Member
    from wichita,ks

    I have a 53 chevy 3100 and wanna change my standard 235 to an automatic. I just picked up a 50-62 cast iron pwr glide but it does not appear like it will bolt up? I thought there was only one pwr glide made for that inline 6?( objective was to keep as stock as possible) I want to keep cost dwn if I need an adapter, will a 700-R4 bolt up to that 235. willing to even go with a late 350 tranny if adapter is made for them? thax!
     
  11. HEATHEN
    Joined: Nov 22, 2005
    Posts: 7,592

    HEATHEN
    Member
    from SIDNEY, NY

    I don't know what year 'glide you bought, but your truck should (if still stock) have an enclosed driveline, meaning that only a PG from '50-'54 would have a chance at working.
     
  12. I've got a 56 210 with a 235 and a 'glide and I drive it Houston Traffic. It works but you just need to plan ahead for acceleration space to merge with traffic. I've been driving it in Houston for 19 years with no problems.

    Now, were I faced with a trans swap opportunity like yours, meaning swapping from 3 on the tree to an auto, I would definitely consider a 200-4R for the added ratios, deeper 1st gear and OD.

    But, if you're trying to stay period correct and want to know if driving a 235 in with a 'glide in Houston works, the answer is absolutely.

    Mine has 6.70x15's which are 27.4" tall and stock 3.55 gears in the diff, just so you know.

    PM me and I'll let you drive the car so you can experience what I am talking about. I live near the Galleria and am happy to be part of your "research" as it were.
     
  13. Zeke
    Joined: Mar 4, 2001
    Posts: 1,716

    Zeke
    Member

    Not understanding this logic at all. Swapping to a Iron powerglide makes no sense at all even if it's a daily driver. Do a modern auto swap and be happier. because honestly Ironglides suck.
     
  14. terryble
    Joined: Sep 25, 2008
    Posts: 541

    terryble
    Member
    from canada

    In answer to your original question that seems to have gotten lost in these answers yes to both. The six cylinder PGs are externally different and require a unique adaptor to mount them to the 235.
     
  15. I could be wrong, but I thought the 56-57 Chevy trucks were running Hydramatics. Seems to me this was one of the tricks that allowed the old Junior Stock class sedan deliveries like John Diannas, to run the hydramatic in the 60's.
    Having had a 66 Chevy truck with a powerglide, the only way I'd put one in my truck would be to take it to a scrapyard. Any 3 or more speed trans will make a better driver, especially with a six.
     
  16. HEATHEN
    Joined: Nov 22, 2005
    Posts: 7,592

    HEATHEN
    Member
    from SIDNEY, NY

    Hydramatics were available in Chevy trucks from 1954-59, for both sixes and V8s. GMC got them a year earlier in '53.
     
  17. Zeke
    Joined: Mar 4, 2001
    Posts: 1,716

    Zeke
    Member

    Since when? :confused: You do mean the Cast iron PG because the aluminum SBC pattern PG need the adapter like a any other modern Chevy trans, not the 1950-1963 Iron PG
     
  18. Hnstray
    Joined: Aug 23, 2009
    Posts: 10,744

    Hnstray
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Quincy, IL

    Boys!!! stop arguing.....!!! some correct and some incorrect info in these prior replies.

    Starting with the use of the word "adapter"......some people use that term to describe ANY "plate" or intermediate part used (even by the "factory) when attaching a trans to an engine. As was mentioned in at least one post, '50 thru '62 cast iron PG's, 6 & V8 models alike, had a cast iron plate, about 1 1/2" thick, that attached to the engine block and to which the transmission case then bolted.

    Yes, the '54 thru '59 Chevy trucks had Hydramatics as an option. No matter. For the OP's purposes, that is even more useless than the iron PG, IMO.

    Chevy pickups from the 1st design '55 and up have open driveline, so.....even if wanting to use an iron PG, the '55 up passenger car trans would be best suited. And, depending on the desired mount setup for the engine trans, it may be that the '58 thru '62 trans would be best. That model range has a trans mount provision on the tailhousing not present on earlier versions, to the best of my knowledge.

    Finally, I do agree with several posters that a later model transmission would be most suitable from a driving performance perspective. At minmum, a TH350. Next up the ladder, I would choose a 2004R and lastly a 700R4. Any of these transmissions would require an "adapter"...which in this case means...an aftermarket supplied plate, not a GM factory part, with which to mate the 235 and the later trans of choice.

    Ray
     
  19. Zeke
    Joined: Mar 4, 2001
    Posts: 1,716

    Zeke
    Member

    Hnstray, Spot on!
     
  20. terryble
    Joined: Sep 25, 2008
    Posts: 541

    terryble
    Member
    from canada

    The question was not what is everybodies opinion on "what should I use" it is clearly stated above, I certainly was not trying to argue with the experts, I was trying to answer the question that was asked to the best of my ability. There is way to many too much opinion and unasked for advise and not enough trying to just answer honest legit questions here lately
     
  21. Hnstray
    Joined: Aug 23, 2009
    Posts: 10,744

    Hnstray
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Quincy, IL


    Okay.......let's try this again. Just facts...no opinions.

    Yes, Powerglides (defined as 2 speed automatic offered by Chevrolet from 1950 onward through the early '70s) were optional in Chevy passenger cars from 1950 onward and in Chevy pickups from 1960 onward until superseded by the TH350 and TH400 transmissions in the late '60s/early'70s.


    However, there are two distinctly different versions of transmissions named "Powerglide". From 1950 through 1962, in most applications, they were cast iron case models. From 1950 through 1954 passenger car production they were fitted with torque tube drivelines. From 1955 models Powerglides were open driveline. Through 1962 full size cars and pickups used the 235 six cylinder engine as standard equipment with V8 options beginning in 1955 models

    Beginning in 1962 model year production a new Powerglide was introduced on the Chevy II (with the new 194/230 six cyl) and full size Chevy cars equipped with 327 V8 engines. The new PG was adopted across all models in 1963 models, as was the new design six cylinder.

    So, depending on which Powerglide you have in your possession, it may bolt up to your 235 six with all stock factory pieces. That is, if it's the earlier cast iron case version and is from a 235 six cylinder vehicle.

    If you have the later aluminum case Powerglide, if you wish to use that behind the 235, you will need an aftermarket adapter to accomplish that.


    Ray
     
  22. 1953naegle
    Joined: Nov 18, 2013
    Posts: 212

    1953naegle
    Member

    IMHO for daily drivers, if you're going to be on the highway more often... the newer trannys are probably the way to go.
    Now if you're just cruzzin around surface streets under 55mph, iron powerglides work fine. I drove my 53' around our small town with the original powerglide and had no complaints(till the driveline burst, but that's another story^^)
     

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