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Projects 1960 Humber Hawk

Discussion in 'Traditional Customs' started by matt-miles, May 24, 2016.

  1. Nice car. There was a very nice chopped one in one of my 1980's Streetmachine magazines which was very cool.
    Very rare car in Holland, but there is one close to my home.

    Hennie
     
  2. matt-miles
    Joined: Aug 31, 2012
    Posts: 67

    matt-miles
    Member

    Hey james, I did think of that a while ago - but didn't follow it up... Will look into that idea for sure. Thanks!
     
  3. matt-miles
    Joined: Aug 31, 2012
    Posts: 67

    matt-miles
    Member

    Both of your points make a lot of sense 'Squablow' - I'm definitely going to aim to attach closer to the arch itself now, whether I do what you suggest, or try to radius the new tub section is the next question... I did a little research earlier today and found this by Lazze:



    As I've got the old part more or less out in one piece, I reckon I can use that as a good enough guide - even if I don't get the radius quite as deep... I don't however, have access to an English Wheel, so it may look a little 'rough and ready' - but as long as it does the job eh?!
     
    Squablow likes this.
  4. vetteguy402
    Joined: Oct 27, 2009
    Posts: 148

    vetteguy402
    Member
    from omaha, ne

  5. Last edited: May 25, 2017
    matt-miles likes this.
  6. Bearcat_V8
    Joined: Sep 21, 2011
    Posts: 373

    Bearcat_V8
    Member
    from Dexter, MI

    I don't think you need to buy anything , except maybe some plywood to make some hammer forms. The threads below show some nice simple hammer form work. You might need to make your inner wheel houses out of two or three hammer formed pieces but I am pretty sure you now possess the skills to pull it off.

    http://www.2wings.com/m12/log/05-2/05-2.htm
    the thread below shows a HAMBer hammerforming a firewall.
    https://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/threads/tech-amateur-firewall-fabrication.378752/
    A VW rear valance panel
    https://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=609099
    050517ReadyToFormFwdPanel.jpg
     
  7. matt-miles
    Joined: Aug 31, 2012
    Posts: 67

    matt-miles
    Member

    Hi guys, thanks for all the awesome advice...

    James D, I thought about those too, but the price puts me off (but as a last resort, they may get another look - thanks again!)

    So, I've spent a lot of time scratching my head... Drinking tea... Scratching my head some more... Then I thought, screw it, and got cracking... I decided to make the half wheel-tub out of 2 pieces; a 'wall' that meets the wheel arch repair panel, and a thin strip that forms the radius, which I'd weld to the existing flange.

    Tried to make a cardboard template of the 'wall', but it just wasn't working out.
    IMG_6947.jpg

    Ignore the sketch on the card - that was the template for the dropped axle for my lad's tot-rod wagon (in my profile pic)

    IMG_6948.jpg

    As I said, that wasn't working out - so I thought if I tackled it from the other side (the radius, part) I could shrink/stretch a strip of metal to match the radius of the existing wheel-tub flange, then use that as a template to make the 'wall' from.

    So I started by bending a 90 degree flange in the metal by hammering it over an offcut of kitchen worktop. Then I hammered a much softer radius along the opposite edge in my wooden stump. No special tools so far, just a ball pein hammer with a high crown. Then, off to the shrinker/stretcher I've borrowed from a friend.

    IMG_6953.jpg

    IMG_6950.jpg

    I started by shrinking what would be the inside of the curve a little, then stretched the flange side. I'd never really used this tool before, so it took a little bit of learning to work out the feel of what I was doing. I did however quickly find out that if you over-stretch an area (which I did a few times as can be seen in the next few pics) you can always un-do it by hitting that same area with the shrinker jaws.

    IMG_6952.jpg IMG_6954.jpg

    The curve starting to take shape. I needed to catch up with the stretching at this point

    IMG_6958.jpg
    Here, you can see where I'd over stretched the flange side, and created a bit of a peak to the radius. Some careful work with the shrinker on the flange-side, and some stretching on the inside of the curve helped to even this out a little.

    IMG_6959.jpg
    I was also worried about losing the nice, soft curve on the opposite side to the flange, but going back over it with the hammer kept it in shape

    IMG_6962.jpg
    A little test-fit at the end of the night, and I'm pleased to report that I think it's gonna work! My only problem is working out how to weld to what's left of the existing flange. Access is going to be tough for clean up of the metal for plug welding, so I might have to cut the existing flange off and re-create that. But I'm more confident now than before, so if that's what it takes, that's what it takes.

    IMG_6963.jpg
    Fit is pretty good along the length (sorry for the crap photos, it was getting late)

    IMG_6964.jpg
    Anyway, thanks for watching... Itching to get back on it again later this week...
     

    Attached Files:

  8. Peanut 1959
    Joined: Oct 11, 2008
    Posts: 1,964

    Peanut 1959
    Member

    Fantastic work, mate! Keep at it!
     
  9. inthweedz
    Joined: Mar 29, 2011
    Posts: 410

    inthweedz
    Member

    All that hard work has the ol' girl looking good.. Humber Hawks were sold down here in New Zealand, and there are still a few around..
    There was one I passed going to and from work regularly, (lived just around the corner for a while) had a Nissan V8 and manual box in it running on LPG..
    Unfortunately it was in a headon collision about 8 months ago and was severely damaged, haven't seen it since, pity..
     
  10. Stueeee
    Joined: Oct 21, 2015
    Posts: 239

    Stueeee
    Member
    from Kent, UK

    Matt, that's really excellent work on the Humber so far. I think you're approach of doing one part of the car and then moving on to the next is the best approach too.

    I've seen so many people cut out all the rust everywhere in one go on some old bodyshell and then been completely overwhelmed by the magnitude of the job ahead, with the result that the project stalls and the car usually ends up being scrapped.

    BTW, If you are thinking of using that P6 Rover V8 motor. They can be quite expensive to rebuild if that's what it needs. The P6 short water pump and other distributor etc. external bits will bolt up to to the later Discovery/ Range Rover 3.9 or 4.6 V8s and deliver a lot more power than the 3.5
     
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  11. matt-miles
    Joined: Aug 31, 2012
    Posts: 67

    matt-miles
    Member

    Managed to grab a couple of hours on this tonight...

    Decided to remove the flange from the existing half of the wheeltub as it was just too rusty to weld anything to...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  12. Paul Smith
    Joined: Jun 8, 2017
    Posts: 4

    Paul Smith
    Member

  13. matt-miles
    Joined: Aug 31, 2012
    Posts: 67

    matt-miles
    Member

    Really small update on the ol' girl...

    IMG_0285.jpg
    Melted off some more of the lead from the dented rear quarter - just to see what's what...

    IMG_0282.jpg Also managed to 'proper-weld' in the first half of the tub repair... Upgraded my welder just before tackling this, so it took a lot more time and a lot of blow-through's (not to mention a few choice words!) to finish.

    IMG_0287.jpg
    I didn't plan on it, but I think the easiest thing to do here is going to be to cut this section out and weld the new repair section to a fresh, straight bit of steel... I'm going to have to add a fair amount of filler/lead to this part anyway, just to match the profile of the rest of it, so it should be alright...

    IMG_0284.jpg
    Here you can see the nice new straight flange to weld the other half of the wheel tub to, as well as the extent of the dent.

    Thanks again for all the encouraging words guys!

    Matt
     
  14. Paul Smith
    Joined: Jun 8, 2017
    Posts: 4

    Paul Smith
    Member

    That wheel arch is looking great Matt!
     
    vetteguy402 likes this.
  15. vetteguy402
    Joined: Oct 27, 2009
    Posts: 148

    vetteguy402
    Member
    from omaha, ne

    Great job with those repairs. You'll have it back on the road in no time.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  16. I always dug the Humbers, they had a nice look to them. I'm enjoying the great metal work.
     
    vetteguy402 likes this.
  17. matt-miles
    Joined: Aug 31, 2012
    Posts: 67

    matt-miles
    Member

    Took a day away from the computer today to play on the Humber... kind of a therapy I guess...

    [​IMG]
    Nice to be working in the daylight with the doors all open
    [​IMG]
    My shop dawg... looking all mean!
    [​IMG]
    Cardboard template to get a rough idea of the size of the outer 'return' panel
    [​IMG][​IMG]
    The same thing in steel
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    I now have to work out the best way of forming that return panel out to meet the lip of the wheel arch repair panel. Starting to wish I had an English wheel for this job! But a stump and mallet will have to do I guess.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Hopefully more to come soon!

    Thanks for watching,

    Matt


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  18. Squablow
    Joined: Apr 26, 2005
    Posts: 14,628

    Squablow
    Member

    The way you're doing it is what I was thinking of when you first showed what had to be done, I think it's going to work out good. Just have to make sure you have ample coating and drain holes between those panels so they don't get full of dirt and moisture again. Looking forward to updates.
     
  19. matt-miles
    Joined: Aug 31, 2012
    Posts: 67

    matt-miles
    Member

    So, I’ve just picked this back up again after focussing on another OT project for a while...

    That last piece I had been working on failed... once I tried to hammer out the return, the whole thing warped to the point that it wasn’t going to fit, so I started from scratch.

    I’m not finished yet, but this piece is already looking better, and I can still cut it about if I need to get a better fit.

    Here’s some pics from today’s progress...[​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
    nunattax, Squablow, Okie Pete and 6 others like this.
  20. Now I am impressed, you got diddled by the Bondo-n-tape crook that sold you the car, now you are transforming a pumpkin into a chariot. Reading this for the first time, I have to say that your learning curve was a flat line vertical on this project. Here on Vancouver Island, we still have the odd Humber on the road, no salt and a mild (for Canada) climate plus a lot of Prefects, Austins, Rileys, Jags etc etc sold here in the 50's and 60's however they all had rust problems. Carry on welding, you have to run out of rust at some point. Your vision is a good one.
    Cheers mate, you are an inspiration to the real roots of hot rodding.
     
  21. matt-miles
    Joined: Aug 31, 2012
    Posts: 67

    matt-miles
    Member

    Wow, thanks so much! That last line got me choked up a little!




    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
    knucklescars likes this.
  22. morac41
    Joined: Jul 23, 2011
    Posts: 532

    morac41
    Member

  23. matt-miles
    Joined: Aug 31, 2012
    Posts: 67

    matt-miles
    Member

    Hey! Its been a while!

    As usual with these things, life has got in the way a little bit... But I've still been picking away at the ol' girl when time allows it. In fact, I took a couple of days off last week to get back at it!

    I've managed to weld in the inner tub-half that I'd fabri-cobbled together, as well as the outer wing (fender) panel...
    361c5a0f-1475-4159-9cca-be9ab1e38b8c.jpg
    So I'd umm'd and ahh'd (not to mention researching on here as best I could) about whether to butt-weld the panel in, or 'joggle' the edges and plug weld it... Well, I decided to go the whole-hog and butt-weld it in. I used the technique I've seen on here (by MP&C on the 55 Chevy 210 Wagon) where you tack weld every couple of inches or so. Grind those flat and planish the welds. then repeat while overlapping the previous tacks... Although my work is no-where as clean as MP&C's - I got much less distortion than I was expecting. I was always going to have to use some filler on this car, but I'm happy that I'll be using less than I've pulled out of it at least.
    35fda4c5-4441-447f-804f-016e662c3222.jpg
    42b55e62-2f4a-45ab-a510-75e57b77e869.jpg
    b8e4ad6f-6e74-4b41-b61f-e82d3870f9c3.jpg
    1eeb5a88-3d5b-46a8-99aa-432a0b271e88.jpg
    8567e3ed-19db-4c08-ae23-18bf4fb7aa0d.jpg
    adec6935-1249-4ba9-84f9-429a0e0e75d5.jpg
    And my little shop foreman for the weekend!

    Next job is to seam-seal around all the welds underneath and add a little lead to the top-side. Then onto the front corner!

    What would people recommend for stone-chipping the wheel tub? I'm thinking about either a soft, rust-inhibiting wax or something more permanent like truck-bed liner (lizard-skin, I think its called over here). Any thoughts?

    Thanks in advance!

    M
     

    Attached Files:

    Okie Pete and Squablow like this.
  24. Doing great.
    My only suggestion would be to do rounded corners on the patches if you can...helps minimise distortion.
     
    matt-miles likes this.
  25. Okie Pete
    Joined: Oct 29, 2008
    Posts: 3,290

    Okie Pete
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    WOW amazing skills , Great work on your car . Enjoying your post Thank you for posting .
     
    matt-miles likes this.
  26. matt-miles
    Joined: Aug 31, 2012
    Posts: 67

    matt-miles
    Member

    Thanks, man! Now you mention it, that makes a lot of sense! Will do that in future...

    Looking at the patch panel a couple of days later - there is a little more distortion than I'd first thought, but I can lead it to bring it out a little. It's way better than the crap I cut out of it in any case!
     
  27. matt-miles
    Joined: Aug 31, 2012
    Posts: 67

    matt-miles
    Member

    Why thank you sir!
     
  28. knucklescars
    Joined: Nov 30, 2008
    Posts: 62

    knucklescars
    Member

    Lookin good, bud.
     
  29. Morris
    Joined: May 9, 2009
    Posts: 46

    Morris
    Member
    from UK

    Excellent work!
     

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