Register now to get rid of these ads!

Technical 1939 Mercury Build

Discussion in 'Traditional Customs' started by swissmike, Jun 28, 2015.

  1. Black Clover Custom
    Joined: Dec 20, 2014
    Posts: 499

    Black Clover Custom
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Nice work, but don't you have to weld the floor and rockers yet?
    I do wish i was at primer stage though...
     
    swissmike likes this.
  2. swissmike
    Joined: Oct 22, 2003
    Posts: 1,269

    swissmike
    Member

    Correct. That will be the next thing so the body gets its structural strength back. It was easier stripping and priming the shell without the innards. Much of the primer will come off again during the chop and final body work, but I can't let it turn into a rust heap in the meantime. I'll probably do the chassis next, so I can do the chop with the body on the frame.


    Sent from my iPad using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  3. bigbore
    Joined: Oct 25, 2006
    Posts: 140

    bigbore
    Member

  4. 1-SHOT
    Joined: Sep 23, 2014
    Posts: 1,530

    1-SHOT
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I did the same repair on the doors for my 39 Mercury Convertable and they came out great. The only problem I had was the body shop where I worked saw it and that's what they wanted me to do on customer cars. I told them they could not afforde my labor rate to do insurance repairs like that. I wound up quitting a getting a job down the street.
    There is a big difference between collision repair and restoration work. I beat on sheet metal for over 60 years, you are a true Craftsman body man not a technition. Frank
     
  5. swissmike
    Joined: Oct 22, 2003
    Posts: 1,269

    swissmike
    Member

    Thanks, Frank!

    Sorry for the slow pace, but between the hurricane, work, house, and a lack of motivation, I haven’t really made much progress.

    Before welding the subrails and floors I wanted to check the door fit and noticed that there was quite a bit of misalignment on the front and back edge. This was the side where I replaced the entire door bottom and also the bottom of the a-pillar. The difficulty was that both repairs had to be done separately, but the fit could really only be checked with the doors installed, which I had not done previously.

    The bottom of the door was a bad fit, but was relatively easy to fix by adjusting the cross brace

    [​IMG]

    Cutting out the brace

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Finished: I wanted to have the bottom very slightly tucked in, to make sure there is some light contact with the rubber bumper.

    [​IMG]


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  6. swissmike
    Joined: Oct 22, 2003
    Posts: 1,269

    swissmike
    Member

    Here is front edge. The misalignment is in both directions.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    To correct the gap in the first direction, I cut and bent the door jamb backwards to even the gap.

    [​IMG]

    Then cut out the outer skin from the a-pillar and made a template to give me the contour of the door edge with the door removed.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Metal replaced....

    [​IMG]

    Still not perfect. The door is just a hair proud of the a-pillar, but I will blend it in with lead or filler.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Now on to the other side. Should be better fit as I did not replace the entire door bottom.



    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  7. Black Clover Custom
    Joined: Dec 20, 2014
    Posts: 499

    Black Clover Custom
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Nice work! I did alot of the same , but less with my doors and body recently. I cut the lower hinge and welded it back together with the amount i needed inward. Lined it up great that way without changing the top or rear edges. Just sucked the front lower in a bit.
     
    swissmike likes this.
  8. swissmike
    Joined: Oct 22, 2003
    Posts: 1,269

    swissmike
    Member

    I’m back! Had some other projects get in the way of the Merc, but hoping to stick with it for a while.

    Anyway, last weekend I had to correct the bottom of the a-pillar after hanging the door, but it was not quite as bad as the first one.

    I finally welded in all the caged nuts which were rotted or which were in sheet metal spots I replaced. This car uses 5/16-24 throughout for fenders, running boards etc. The restoration places usually want to charge $2/ea, but I found them at McMaster Carr for about $1/ea.

    [​IMG]

    They are oily so I cleaned them with solvent and sprayed the bottom side with weld through primer, then used the pneumatic punch to add the 3/16” holes for plug welding them in place. The underside has a lip which centers them in a 1/2” hole.
    I trial fit them and marked the hole location, then used the Dremel to grind the primer off where the weld will be applied.

    A bolt and washer from the outside holds the nut in place. I slightly bend the tabs downward so when I tighten the bolt the tabs will make contact with the body without leaving a gap. For the plug welds I just up the setting one click (from 18 Ga to 16 Ga), to get good and immediate melt puddle.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    All in all I welded in about 25 nuts. Tomorrow I will weld in the subrails permanently.



    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
  9. Glad you're back. That would have taken some time...all 25.
     
    swissmike likes this.
  10. Great find
    Gotta love McMaster Carr
     
    swissmike likes this.
  11. The 39 guy
    Joined: Nov 5, 2010
    Posts: 2,660

    The 39 guy
    Member

    It's good to see you back working on your project! I have missed reading your posts.
     
    swissmike likes this.
  12. swissmike
    Joined: Oct 22, 2003
    Posts: 1,269

    swissmike
    Member

    As promised, the subrails went in today. Final adjustments with the doors in place, then removing the subrails again to drill and punch all the weld holes. Replace the subrails and mark all hole locations, remove subrails again to grind all marked hole locations free of primer, reinstall subrails and weld in place.

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    The driver side door is still a poor fit, I will have to cut the diagonal brace in order to let the lower rear corner of the door come out slightly. The bottom of the a-pillar still needs to be built up with lead to match the door contour, but I should probably wait until the body is finally in the frame and properly shimmed.
    At this point I’m satisfied the doors fit in the openings and I can weld in the floor pieces. I can weld the trunk floor in with the body on the cart, but then need to modify how it sits on the cart to weld in the rear seat pan and the main floor.


    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
  13. Lookin’ good! Glad to see an update on this thread!
     
    swissmike likes this.
  14. Shiiiiiit, y’all might as well restore this back to factory
    You’re more than halfway there.


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  15. swissmike
    Joined: Oct 22, 2003
    Posts: 1,269

    swissmike
    Member

    Installed and welded in the trunk floor and the rear seat riser piece.
    Lots of fitting, taking out, adjusting, reinstalling before finally welding in place. I placed the 3/16” holes every 1.5” or so in the floor pans so most of the welding had to be done from underneath the car.

    IMG_8616.JPG
    IMG_8626.JPG
    IMG_8625.JPG
    IMG_8624.JPG

    Only the seam between the two panels is welded solid. Everything else will stay spot welded only like from the factory. I will seal all the seams after cleanup and priming.

    IMG_8622.JPG

    Doesn’t look like it but this was 15 hours of work. Next will be installing of the main floor piece. I already took the body off the dolly to have access for installing the seat riser piece. I’ll put it back once the floors are in.



    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
  16. Thanks for the update Mike.
    Looking great
     
    swissmike likes this.
  17. swissmike
    Joined: Oct 22, 2003
    Posts: 1,269

    swissmike
    Member

    Instead of marking the hole locations for the spot welds, I switched to using the Dremel tool with a round 1/8" carbide burr to remove the primer with both pieces clamped together before plug welding. It's important to get an immediate weld puddle started on the base metal rather than on the piece with the hole to get good penetration.


    Sent from my iPad using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  18. Floor looks good! Really like your attention to detail - it shows in the end result.
     
    swissmike likes this.
  19. CURSED GEARS
    Joined: Jul 21, 2016
    Posts: 146

    CURSED GEARS
    Member

    Still watching. Good stuff.
     
    swissmike likes this.
  20. Just checking in on the progress looks awesome.
     
    swissmike likes this.
  21. swissmike
    Joined: Oct 22, 2003
    Posts: 1,269

    swissmike
    Member

    I ground the weld spots flush where there is only little clearance with the frame, then primered all bare spots including the caged nuts. View attachment 4036002



    Some of you might remember when I fabricated the floor pan two years ago...
    Anyway it’s finally time to weld it in place. I first drilled 1/4” holes in the subrails and 3/16” holes in the pan where it meets the seat riser.
    IMG_8647.JPG
    IMG_8656.JPG

    I absolutely love this HF step drill which goes from 3/16” to 1/2”. I can lean on it without fear of breaking and had held up great.

    After wrestling the pan in between the subrails, I started lining it up in the rear using locating holes I had previously made. I supported the pan from below with a 2x4 and a jack while I inserted wooden blocks to push the pan against the subrails.
    IMG_8649.JPG

    I welded the plug welds after checking the alignment starting in the rear and making my way forward, alternating after 10 or so welds.

    IMG_8648.JPG

    Again, I used the Dremel and a small ball mill to clean the spot welds before welding
    IMG_8650.JPG

    Relying on the locating holes was important to assure the correct slope from the driveshaft tunnel to the subrails. After finishing the subrails, I started placing the welds along the seat riser. In order to push the edge of the pan against the lip of the riser I placed the jack with a 4x4 under the car, and clamped a square tube to the window edge to engage a vertical brace to push the two panels together.
    IMG_8652.JPG

    A piece of schedule 80 gray PVC tubing cut slightly oversized worked well instead of the wood piece. I used a hammer and a punch to assure both panel lay flat before welding.
    IMG_8657.JPG
    IMG_8658.JPG

    Finally welded in place. Doors still close, and the body gained a lot of rigidity. The welds still need to be dressed down and all bare areas primered, but for now I’m glad the floor is in!


    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2018
  22. Great milestone!
     
    swissmike likes this.
  23. Nicely done! Looks great. I’m curious, why did you drilled both pieces instead of just the top?
     
    swissmike likes this.
  24. bigbore
    Joined: Oct 25, 2006
    Posts: 140

    bigbore
    Member

    Very nice! Like it!
     
    swissmike likes this.
  25. swissmike
    Joined: Oct 22, 2003
    Posts: 1,269

    swissmike
    Member

    Only the top piece is drilled. On the subrails it’s the top of the subrail, on the back edge it is the floor pan.


    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
    rodncustomdreams and brEad like this.
  26. Okay, thanks. Thought there might be a trick you were using that I could borrow.
     
    swissmike likes this.
  27. swissmike
    Joined: Oct 22, 2003
    Posts: 1,269

    swissmike
    Member

    Some cleanup work this week: ground all the welds and cleaned the burn spots on the flip side, then sprayed some more primer to cover all bare spots

    [​IMG]

    Decided to correct the twist in the driver side door. The diagonal brace had to be cut loose, but I ended up having to cut a piece out because the plug welds were solid and I couldn’t get them apart without making a mangled mess.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    The holes are not drilled out spot welds but in preparation for plug welding a lap jointed patch
    [​IMG]

    With the brace loose, the door becomes soft and can be manually pulled into the correct shape. Once it is ok with the door closed, the brace is secured with vise grips, then welded in place. The door gaps are not perfect and some of the contours will need some filler, but much better than before. I wanted a slightly tighter fit at the bottom to end up with a little pressure against the rubber lower bumper in the jamb.
    [​IMG]

    Cleaned the spot welds in the wheel wells and applied another couple of coats of POR15.

    I plan to seal all the seams next weekend. Spraying undercoating at this stage is probably a good idea too. Thinking of using the Eastwood rubberized undercoating. Thoughts?



    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
  28. patterg2003
    Joined: Sep 21, 2014
    Posts: 527

    patterg2003

    Still following along in awe. The work is true craftsmanship and skill. Glad to see you back at the car and again sharing your methods & train of thought for each phase of the work.
     
    swissmike likes this.
  29. Modded 105E
    Joined: Jul 3, 2017
    Posts: 85

    Modded 105E

    Superb workmanship. Very impressed indeed. Please keep us fully posted in detail when you tackle the 'chop'.
     
    chryslerfan55 and swissmike like this.
  30. AKHotrod
    Joined: Aug 23, 2017
    Posts: 5

    AKHotrod

    Gives me lots of encouragement for when I start my project in a few months...

    Thanks, and excellent work... 49854.jpeg

    Sent from my SM-G920V using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2020 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.