Register now to get rid of these ads!

1936 Ford Flathead V8 build thread

Discussion in 'The Antiquated' started by Christopher Miller, Dec 26, 2019.

  1. Ziggster
    Joined: Aug 27, 2018
    Posts: 584

    Ziggster
    Member

    Awesome metal work. With some patience, ingenuity, and simple tools, many complicated shapes can be formed.
     
  2. nor6304
    Joined: Aug 23, 2009
    Posts: 217

    nor6304
    Member
    from Indiana

    Keep up the good work & Thank you for posting the build
     
    Christopher Miller likes this.
  3. fullhouse296
    Joined: Jan 30, 2009
    Posts: 387

    fullhouse296
    Member
    from Australia

    Those 4 speeds are as common as .not much good for anything accepting maybe a lathe trans .you should be able to get one at a swap meet for under a hundred .
    do you know what a crash box is , and what they are like to drive ?
     
  4. No, what’s a a crash box?


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  5. finn
    Joined: Jan 25, 2006
    Posts: 680

    finn
    Member

    Non synchronized transmission. Need to learn how to double clutch to avoid grinding the gears when shifting.

    It’s pretty much a lost art.

    The non synchronized truck transmission also has a very low first gear, making it almost unusable for normal driving. Gets a heavily loaded truck moving with only an 85 hp engine, though.
     
    Christopher Miller likes this.
  6. Here’s some photos of the generator restoration that I had done previously. The points were all cracked and the coils becoming unwrapped as the binding deteriorated. The coulda got rewrapped. Parts that were safe to be sand blasted were and cleaned up for rust stopping primer and a simple flat black meant for higher temps. Points were also replaced and wires protected with heat shrink tubing. All simple bolts and nuts also replaced after a simple trip to the local department store. IMG_3023.JPG IMG_3027.JPG IMG_3257.JPG IMG_3277.JPG IMG_3268.JPG IMG_3285.JPG IMG_3265.JPG IMG_3320.JPG IMG_3501.JPG IMG_3024.JPG


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
    Desoto291Hemi likes this.
  7. Does anyone else know where to go from here? Trying to remove the rear brake drum. I have the first 3 inch nut off but that’s all IMG_0508.JPG IMG_0508.JPG


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  8. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 15,696

    alchemy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Pull. I've only had a couple of these, but they were all taken apart before I got them. IIRC , once the big nut is off there shouldn't be any mechanical thing holding it on. Maybe a brake shoe has ground a groove into the drum and is catching the drum?
     
  9. I got it all apart after some research and trying a lot of different things
    IMG_0521.JPG IMG_0522.JPG IMG_0524.JPG IMG_0526.JPG IMG_0527.JPG Adjustments.JPG IMG_0531.JPG


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
    Desoto291Hemi likes this.
  10. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 15,696

    alchemy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    So, tell us what the hangup was.
     
    Desoto291Hemi likes this.
  11. Going to try and explain the process of taking this apart...

    When my dad had bought the vehicle many many years ago the truck had a locked up rear brake and this was my attempt at trying to figure out why.

    After propping up the truck and looking at all the mechanical rods I isolated the issue to the brakes as the mechanics like the pedal, or rods operated just fine.

    IMG_4662.JPG

    After taking the dual tires off I started out by removing the axel held in my 6 or so nuts.

    IMG_0130.JPG
    IMG_0118.JPG
    IMG_0131.JPG

    After the axel had been removed, there was a 3 inch nut behind. I removed the nut then a grease retainer behind it.

    IMG_0534.JPG
    Adjustments.JPG

    This is where I got confused. I had taken pictures so I could research that night. This is what I found

    Adjustments.JPG

    So going out that next day I cleaned up the mechanics of grease to try and find two holes to remove it by. Something like this in mind—>

    Adjustments.JPG

    Come to find out after I had cleaned it up there were no holes but rather it was another 3 inch large nut. This referred to as the “adjusting nut”. I had not recognized it being another nut because as the pictures show the nut seems so round that it’s hard to pick up that it has its own sides.

    IMG_0507.JPG

    After the second nut removal the bearing slid right out

    Adjustments.JPG
    IMG_0524.JPG

    With the bearing out the hub came off with a little help. As I got into it it seemed that the grease retainer had worn down and the gasket failed to keep grease where it needed to. Everything was overly covered in grease. The emergency brakes worked well, but the shoes pads will need replaced or glued back to the shoe as they’re wanting to come off. The normal and larger brake is what gave me problems. It did not expand as it should. I took the whole brake assembly apart and plan to clean it all quite intensively. Paint and soda blast as well. Hopefully the grease just stopped a part from flowing smoothly and that’s why the brake wasn’t working. We’ll have to see as time goes. Stay tuned!!


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2020
  12. Finally a warmer day so I can work on this some! I did my first welding job and lemme just warm you it’s so bad but it’s practice that makes you better. Working on the piece above in the front[​IMG][​IMG] IMG_0801.JPG [​IMG] IMG_0807.JPG IMG_0808.JPG [​IMG]

    Here’s some of the pictures of before

    Adjustments.JPG [​IMG][​IMG]


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  13. Really got a lot done today. A bunch of welding. Still a bunch more that needs done but progress is progress. This is all work to the driver side step up and under the front left fender on the cab.

    IMG_0953.JPG IMG_0958.JPG IMG_0964.JPG IMG_0965.JPG IMG_0966.JPG IMG_0967.JPG IMG_0969.JPG IMG_0972.JPG IMG_0974.JPG


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  14. [​IMG]

    Drivers side is finished including step up and all that is under the front fender

    [​IMG]

    A little patch work had to be done to the passengers side (under fender)

    [​IMG]

    Started to work on the passenger side step up

    [​IMG]

    Revisions had to be made to the drivers side and a front plate put on as I realized I had welded it up incorrectly

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Also the metal brace under the cab had to be reinforced



    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  15. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 15,696

    alchemy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I know you are young, and youngsters are always in a hurry, but here's a little unsolicited advice from an old guy: Sandblast the metal BEFORE you weld to it.

    So you go through a bunch of work to find the rust holes, make a patch, weld it in, and then grind it smooth. And then you are going to try to clean all the rest of the remaining rust off the area. But rust is sneaky, and what looked like solid metal right next to that just-fixed hole will show up as more pinholes. I guess time for another patch.

    And, welding on clean metal is SOOO much easier than welding rusty metal. Your welds would look smooth, not like bubble gum. Or are you using a flux core welder?
     
  16. rusty valley
    Joined: Oct 25, 2014
    Posts: 1,669

    rusty valley
    Member

    i have to agree, clean where you are going to weld, even a little with a sander disc will help to make it easier to weld and pleasant to look at. i do appreciate all the effort to fix up the old gal, keep it up. and, generators are a dime a dozen, find one that has not been sitting in the ocean
     
    Christopher Miller likes this.
  17. Thank you for all the advice! I appreciate it all. I will plan on grinding a lot of the metal now in search of rust I may not be able to see. I get why that’s important now. Would hate to get to the painting just to have rust break through a few years down the road


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  18. I purchased a small soda blaster a few months ago that i’ve been using. Is it a good idea to invest in a sand blaster or either works just fine?

    [​IMG]


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  19. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 15,696

    alchemy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Soda will remove paint but not rust. You need sand for that. Even grinding rusty areas won't remove the rust from down in the pits. Sandblasting will.
     
    Christopher Miller likes this.
  20. Here is all the welding after grinding it down

    IMG_1019.JPG [​IMG]

    ...and here are the imperfections that will need attention
    [​IMG]


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  21. Window frame replacing

    IMG_1071.JPG IMG_1073.JPG

    Passenger door

    [​IMG] IMG_1076.JPG IMG_1080.JPG
    For the passenger door I brushed what I could reach and just sprayed a rust stopping paint up into the door. After all this welding is finished on the cab I plan to spray the whole inside that will not receive actual paint with rust protection .


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
    biggeorge likes this.
  22. Mart
    Joined: Mar 3, 2001
    Posts: 4,146

    Mart
    Member

    What type of welder are you using?

    Not wanting to be critical but all that slag shouldn't be on there.. If you could find what is causing that and get some decent beads laid down it would be much more fulfilling. Does anyone live nearby that is a proficient welder and could give you some tips?

    Good progress being made, though.
     
    biggeorge and Christopher Miller like this.
  23. Ziggster
    Joined: Aug 27, 2018
    Posts: 584

    Ziggster
    Member

    That is a hell of a lot of metal patching. It is nice to see you are not intimidated by the task at hand. I'm sure many older and perhaps more experienced would have given up by now. Like you said - little by little.
    Practice makes perfect, but try to learn a bit each time you patch in a piece. Welding on rusty steel will never turn out well. Welding outside with a MIG welder and gas can be challenging if that is what you are using. I'm learning as well, but patience and prep is key to welding. Keep up the good work.
     
    Christopher Miller likes this.
  24. 1946caddy
    Joined: Dec 18, 2013
    Posts: 1,678

    1946caddy
    Member
    from washington

    You need to have a clean bare metal spot to clamp your ground clamp to
     
    biggeorge likes this.
  25. 1-SHOT
    Joined: Sep 23, 2014
    Posts: 1,849

    1-SHOT
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Back to the original question you can Heli-Arc your transmission with 309L Stainless. Preheat and weld it up. One word of caution it doesn’t liked to be drilled or tapped. But it welds like spreading peanut butter. They also make 2 kinds of arc welding rods one is machine able and the other one is hard surface.
     
    Christopher Miller likes this.
  26. Thanks I knew this and try to as pictured in most I just didn’t have a bare metal spot and it seemed to work just fine. I didn’t want to clean a new spot either as it would just add more trouble later


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  27. I’m using a MIG welder. Can you explain what you mean by slag? I understand I’m not the best welder but really just trying to get better and it seems I’m not with all the replys. I know a few welders and actually some friends of mine going to a career technology school for welding. I’ll ask around to see if I can get some help. I’m getting to the point of wrapping up on the Cab so most of it will be on other parts like the Grill and Fenders


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
    biggeorge likes this.
  28. Thank you so much! Trying to learn as these are really my first moments welding. The door had been welded up by my dad and you can see that work in previous pictures. Neither of us are welders but we try. Means a lot to hear the motivation as I realize there’s still so much that needs done overall


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
    biggeorge likes this.
  29. I’ve set the welder to the right settings based on the gauge of the metal and the wire I’m using but still often find myself blowing through the metal which is creating many issues, any suggestions? I’ve tried to just do many spot welds (the recent corner of the door was done doing this if you wanna see how that turned out) and I didn’t blow through once just took way longer.

    [​IMG]

    This is when I spot welded to prevent blow through. Do you think it’s just blowing through because a lot of the metal is rust damaged and thin?


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2020 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.