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Projects Stolen Tech: Make your own rotisserie (Pics & Plans)

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Abomination, Jul 15, 2008.

  1. Abomination
    Joined: Oct 5, 2006
    Posts: 6,603

    Abomination
    Member

    I found this here:
    http://forums.pelicanparts.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=228044&highlight=Flank

    Yeah, I know it's a 911, but this is about the rotisserie. :D Flank did an awesome job. It's his deal though, and if you have any questions, you'll need to PM him at the link above.

    Anyway, here it is in it's entirety for your viewing enjoyment:



    Hi all,
    Here are some pictures of the chassis rotisserie for the early 911's.

    [​IMG]

    I would like to say that if you are planning to put your car on a rotisserie, that you have most if not all of your sheetmetal work done and also if it's a Targa, make sure you have the body braced. I had made braces for some of the previous repairs and I used them now too.

    [​IMG]


    The whole rotisserie is held together with 5/8" pins, and it can come apart easy for storage. The next picture shows these pins, and some gussets.

    [​IMG]


    To raise and lower the tool I decided to use these 'farm jacks' over using hydraulic cylinders. I like the mechanical action of the jacks and raising or lowering the car can be done by one person.

    [​IMG]

    I made an 'index wheel' that attaches to the yokes. By working in AutoCad, I was able to come up with a simple design that by using two brackets instead of one, I can posistion the car body in one of twenty positions. When the holes are running out on on bracket, they are just begining on the other.

    [​IMG]

    Here is a picture of the rear yoke. Note that the whole thing can be taken apart. By breaking the yoke down into 'components', one person can easly attach it to your car, then you add parts to it, until it's complete.

    [​IMG]

    and the front yoke.

    [​IMG]


    Now, the momment you've all been waiting for, Let's get this car upside down.

    [​IMG]


    The reason I wanted to make this rotisserie was to help with painting the chassis. Also later for installing the wiring harness and the suspension. But the main reason was to make applying the undercoating easier. By having the car body upside down and flat. The brush on coating will have gravity working with it instead of against it. How nice will it be to have the body like this.

    [​IMG]

    Later in this thread, I'll post the dimension plans and more detail shots of the yokes, so you can build your own. I had to redo this thread because the first one had too many pictures!
    Here is a link to the last thread detailing the front suspension pan replacement. From there you can keep going back and check out some of the earlier work, including a chassis jig. I'll close with a self portrait. I hope it doesn't make your computer crash.

    [​IMG]


    Later, Flank.
    __________________
    Flank







    Hi all,
    Here are the demension plans that will help you get started making you own chassis rotisserie for the early 911's. The base for the roto is pretty basic and you can get ideas from the photos.

    [​IMG]


    Here is a detail of mounting the sliding post to rest of the tool.

    [​IMG]

    Here is a detail of the farm jacks used for raising the car body. I did not want the china made jacks so these are from HiLift and the model is EJ550. Do a search for HiLift and order online for $35.00 ea.

    [​IMG]


    Here are the plans that I made up, so far.

    [​IMG]

    and

    [​IMG]

    and

    [​IMG]


    I just lost my connection to the photos. So I'll post some more detail shots later.
    __________________
    Flank
     
  2. Abomination
    Joined: Oct 5, 2006
    Posts: 6,603

    Abomination
    Member

    Here are some more details. If you have any questions, just ask.

    [​IMG]

    and from the back.

    [​IMG]


    If I had to make this rotisserie over again, one change I would make is to mount the long tubing that connects the two ends under the tubing that the casters mount to. The wheels provide plenty of ground clearance to have the long tube mounted there. This way you would not have raise the car so far up to rotate it around. The length of the long tube would have to be increased by 8 inches overall to make up for the new location.

    Here is a detail of the front yoke. Note that the car is upside down. This also shows the lower support bracket for the oil cooler that I made.

    [​IMG]

    Here are two details of the rear yoke.

    [​IMG]

    Look closely at the notches.

    [​IMG]

    and finally a parting shot, showing the overall.

    [​IMG]

    Thanks and I hope you all found this interesting.
    Flank
    __________________
    Flank
     
  3. Vergil
    Joined: Dec 10, 2005
    Posts: 839

    Vergil
    Member

    Thanks for sharing, looks great.

    Vergil
     
  4. Harris
    Joined: Feb 15, 2007
    Posts: 881

    Harris
    Member

    Cool looking, thanks for the info....
     
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  5. Royalshifter
    Joined: May 29, 2005
    Posts: 15,246

    Royalshifter
    Moderator
    from California

    Man that sure saves an aching back.
     
  6. Good post. This should go too the tech section.
     
  7. Thanx for the info.

    I am looking at fabbing one of these down the track. Apart from the fact that my back is trashed, Im looking forward to being able to wrench on my rides more comfortably AND get a better result than otherwise would have been the case.

    Thanx for postin...

    Rat
     
  8. Abomination
    Joined: Oct 5, 2006
    Posts: 6,603

    Abomination
    Member

    Is that even ethical? I mean, I did steal it from that other board. LOL!

    I guess I DID quote/cite it properly. :D

    ~Jason

     
  9. kool! ohh and thanks for the pics jason...ohh thats right, you never sent them!!!! ;)
     
  10. toddc
    Joined: Nov 25, 2007
    Posts: 987

    toddc
    Member

    Stolen Tech is the best kind of tech.:D Very cool.
     
  11. Abomination
    Joined: Oct 5, 2006
    Posts: 6,603

    Abomination
    Member

    Hey, I took 'em! :D

    Been fixing my AC on the house. It's a hellofa a time for that to go, man...

    Sent. :)

    ~Jason


     
  12. Abomination
    Joined: Oct 5, 2006
    Posts: 6,603

    Abomination
    Member

    BTTT for the mornin' crowd.

    ~Jason
     
  13. Von Rigg Fink
    Joined: Jun 11, 2007
    Posts: 13,436

    Von Rigg Fink
    Member
    from Garage

    that would sure make life easy
     
  14. Nitrofan
    Joined: Dec 26, 2006
    Posts: 57

    Nitrofan
    Member
    from Kentucky

    Thanks for posting, that would be real useful in the shop.
     
  15. Stevie Nash
    Joined: Oct 24, 2007
    Posts: 2,937

    Stevie Nash
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    The million dollar question... what's the cost of materials?
     
  16. Abomination
    Joined: Oct 5, 2006
    Posts: 6,603

    Abomination
    Member

    That would depend highly on what you bought vs. what you found laying around and used, I guess.

    :)

    ~Jason

     
  17. Some good ideas there.
     
  18. 34toddster
    Joined: Mar 28, 2006
    Posts: 1,138

    34toddster
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Missouri

    I actually had one similar to this one and I damn near killed myself and helper, when we rotated the car upside down it took off on it's own because it was really top heavy. It was a 64 full size Pontiac, I finally modified it so the arms that mount to the body dropped down to get the centerline of the car in line with the rotating head of the rotisserie. That way the weight is balanced whether the car is right side up or upside down. I don't think it would make much difference on a really lite car like an A or B model. I would suggest anyone building one of these to look at other designs that have dropped arms and incorporate them into this design. Thanks Abomination for the plans!
     
  19. FiddyFour
    Joined: Dec 31, 2004
    Posts: 8,983

    FiddyFour
    Member

    i dig the railroad jacks for raising and lowering the height... lot nicer than holes and pins for sure. i had been kickin the idea around of building a rotisserie outta a pair of engine stands, got a couple ideas from this one that'll really help. thanks dude
     
  20. 49ratfink
    Joined: Feb 8, 2004
    Posts: 14,562

    49ratfink
    Member
    from California

    yeah... what 34 toddster said. there needs to be an adjustment so you get the cars center (weight wise, not inch wise) at the pivot point. the way he has it once you get a full size car body to a certain point gravity takes over and you are screwed.

    there is a guy who sells them at swap meets around here. he made the mistake of having a nice drawing on his flier he hands out. so I took the flier and looked in my scrap pile and adjusted the design to fit the steel I had. I had to buy a couple of pieces of tubing that fit inside each other, everything else was scrounged. cost me about 30 bucks.
     
  21. Abomination
    Joined: Oct 5, 2006
    Posts: 6,603

    Abomination
    Member

    No prob, guys!

    When I saw this, I figured it was too good to keep to myself.

    ~Jason

     
  22. speed-kings
    Joined: Apr 10, 2007
    Posts: 446

    speed-kings
    Member

    I had the local Vocational School build mine. I drew up the plans, Dad was an engineer. Mine has the lower mounting points, and two rails tieing it together at the bottom. Total cost $300. Gearhd69 is currently using it to build his Cuda Gasser.
     
  23. FiddyFour
    Joined: Dec 31, 2004
    Posts: 8,983

    FiddyFour
    Member


    got scans of those blueprints?
     
  24. 23 bucket-t
    Joined: Aug 27, 2005
    Posts: 1,368

    23 bucket-t
    Member

    Cool : you can roast a hole cow on that thing ... BBQ over Abomination house. .... :D
     
  25. Abomination
    Joined: Oct 5, 2006
    Posts: 6,603

    Abomination
    Member

    Back from the dead, for one more hurrah! Yay for stolen tech! :D

    ~Jason
     
  26. joel torres
    Joined: Mar 22, 2009
    Posts: 819

    joel torres
    Member

    thats what we did, we didnt want to really rotate upside down but i could tilt it
    when we wanted to roll it out the garage we bolted a angle iron to the center of the to middle legs facing to each stand to keep them rolling together and unbolted it when i wanted to lay under it
    heres some pics
    i bolt solid wood to the front body mounts and rear then bolted the engine stand plate (without the arms for engine block) to each wood i did front and back one at a time i suspended it up with an engine jack to do this once the plate was bolted i slid the stand onto the axes and let it down
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  27. pitman
    Joined: May 14, 2006
    Posts: 3,357

    pitman
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Hampsha

    One good way to make such a "tool" would be to figure, and estimate the height, of the center of mass. That would let you plan the height "offset" of the mount brackets, so the body would be stable at any pivoted position. (By placing the mass ctr on the pivot's centerline) Not good for anyone, to be watching the whole shebang rotate downward, because of an "eccentric" mass value! :eek:
    Come to think of, the base brackets need to have adequate width and strength/bracing in transverse and car's length directions
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2010
  28. lawman
    Joined: Sep 19, 2006
    Posts: 2,632

    lawman
    Member

    Thanks for the info and pics. Tom (Tired Old Man)
     
  29. RAY With
    Joined: Mar 15, 2009
    Posts: 3,128

    RAY With
    Member

    Looks like a very good solution to a lot of possible problems in restorations-Thanks for the post.
     

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