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Wraping mufflers

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by pokey, Apr 22, 2012.

  1. pokey
    Joined: Apr 3, 2009
    Posts: 217

    pokey
    Member

    I recently found some great heat insulation wrap in a street rodder mag. I ordered it however my concern is where do I find a clamp big enough to keep the insulation on the muffler. has anyone done this before? where would I find a clamp that will wrap around a muffler?
     
  2. Plumbing supplies.
     
  3. whid
    Joined: Jun 20, 2008
    Posts: 452

    whid
    Member

    what about the stainless zip ties ?.............whid
     
  4. goose-em
    Joined: Aug 23, 2008
    Posts: 349

    goose-em
    Member
    from Louisiana

    They make Stainless ties big enough for that.

    I have them in stock.
     

  5. damagedduck
    Joined: Jun 16, 2011
    Posts: 2,342

    damagedduck
    Member
    from Greeley Co

    you could look in plumbing/heating air conditioning or semi truck part houses.
     
  6. Morgan91
    Joined: Sep 12, 2010
    Posts: 560

    Morgan91
    Member
    from Australia

    tie wire does the trick, and costs next to nothing
     
  7. George
    Joined: Jan 1, 2005
    Posts: 7,388

    George
    Member

    Is it a good idea to seal in the heat? Have heard of wrapped headers failing from having cooked to much.
     
  8. Mr48chev
    Joined: Dec 28, 2007
    Posts: 28,553

    Mr48chev
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I'd think that that wrapping would collect moisture and cause anything that was wrapped to rust out a lot faster. If I had a heat issue from the muffler I'd build a heat shield with a slight air space behind it and leave that ugly stuff at the store where it belongs.
     
  9. unkledaddy
    Joined: Jul 21, 2006
    Posts: 2,865

    unkledaddy
    Member

    Header manufacturers will not honor their warranty if you use header wrap on their products.

    I had the experience a few years ago to wrap part of the exhaust system with header wrap, and when I put the infrared thermometer to it I found that the wraps were actually hotter than the bare pipe. I contacted the wrap manufacturer and was told that I needed to wrap everything to bring the temp down. I stripped all the wrap off and sold it as 'slightly used.'
     
  10. thisbugger
    Joined: Feb 8, 2007
    Posts: 198

    thisbugger
    Member

    Stainless safety wire.
     
  11. Big hose clamps can be had and doubled up if you need to. Any hardware store can fix you up.

    Just to ad to what uncledaddy said; I would not do it unless I had a stainless exhaust system, especially underneath where it is going to get wet. The wrap retains moisture and will rust your exhaust out.
     
  12. need louvers ?
    Joined: Nov 20, 2008
    Posts: 12,906

    need louvers ?
    Member

    I did mine like that about ten years ago because the muffler was close enough to the floor that things melted on top...Not good. I used a formed top only insulated shield that I bought from a company in Boston that advertised through Street Rodder and Good Guy's Gazette. I went the stainless zip tie route to fasten it and it has worked great. I use an unusually large Flowmaster muffler under my Plymouth in a two in to single 4" system and have probably upwards of 150,000 miles on the system with no damage to the muffler that I can see.
     
  13. ev88f
    Joined: Jan 29, 2010
    Posts: 371

    ev88f
    Member

    I used the wrap on a section of pipe when it was routed too close to an airline. Within two years that section of pipe completely rotted through. Maybe on a muffler with a thicker case it would last a little longer so long as it was away from any road splash etc...
     
  14. ems customer service
    Joined: Nov 15, 2006
    Posts: 2,573

    ems customer service
    Member

    i agree
     
  15. lilredex
    Joined: Jan 24, 2012
    Posts: 7

    lilredex
    Member

    If you really want to put on a wrap, use some metal shipping straps that come on crates. I bend the ends over double and drill a hole for a small bolt.......works really well, but I'd be more inclined to make a simple heat shield, something like this:

    [​IMG]

    It is 18Ga. bent to shape with those dog legs on the ends rivetted on. Keeps the converter from smoking the floor and carpet above it. Best picture I have at the moment, without going out and crawling under it, for a better.
     
  16. tommy
    Joined: Mar 3, 2001
    Posts: 14,757

    tommy
    Member Emeritus

    I never understood the reason to make a perfectly good exhaust system look like a POS. wrapped in rags. If you are worried about the radiant heat from the exhaust, a simple thin aluminum heat shield works well and looks so much better.
     
  17. 40FordGuy
    Joined: Mar 24, 2008
    Posts: 2,907

    40FordGuy
    Member

    I like lilred's heat shield,...I've seen that same idea on factory stock customer cars,...it works; Which is all it has to do,.......

    4TTRUK
     
  18. 40FordGuy
    Joined: Mar 24, 2008
    Posts: 2,907

    40FordGuy
    Member

    Has anyone installed heat shields / insulation on brake or fuel lines, instead of on exh. parts ? How did that work ?

    4TTRUK
     
  19. JohnEvans
    Joined: Apr 13, 2008
    Posts: 4,883

    JohnEvans
    Member
    from Phoenix AZ

    I agree 110% ! Wrapped exhaust looks like caca!
     
  20. unkledaddy
    Joined: Jul 21, 2006
    Posts: 2,865

    unkledaddy
    Member

    I have a heat shield under my brake master cylinder and another one on the passenger side frame rail that protects the gas line, tranny cooler lines and some electrical lines from header heat. They both do their intended job.
     
  21. I used to have an OT 11 second door slammer that the heasders was a bunch of snakes. I had to wrap a couple of plug wires, I tried hot boots but they didn't reach far enougn so I used asbestos wrap that I made from a piece of an old welding blanket, it worked like a champ.


    heat shields are a good dies, they don't have to be real fancy or they can be. If you are old enough to remember thin k anout the shields on the eshaust of an old Honda Scrambler or any number of stock '60s bikes with high pipes. It was nothing more than a stand out and a piece of metal (usually perforated).
     
  22. mrconcdid
    Joined: Aug 31, 2010
    Posts: 1,157

    mrconcdid
    Member
    from Florida

    I would go with a nice heat shield metal/aluminum, keep it at least and inch from the floor board for an air cushion. You can make it as long as you want to block the radiant heat from the whole system.

    Godspeed
    MrC.
     

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