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Wooden Shop Floors

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by plym49, Feb 22, 2009.

  1. S.F.
    Joined: Oct 19, 2006
    Posts: 2,894

    S.F.
    Member

    Work on a gravel floor and youll love concrete...as I did. We got a slab pored about 2 months ago....The feeling I got to just be able to roll a jack under the car and jack it up. Wow that was cool.
     
  2. 325w
    Joined: Feb 18, 2008
    Posts: 5,629

    325w
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    The Hydramatic plant that burned in 52 or 53 had wood floors.
     
  3. gas pumper
    Joined: Aug 13, 2007
    Posts: 2,956

    gas pumper
    Member

    They make those end grain floors modern now, there is a website for it that I looked at a couple of months ago, but you know I can't remember it. go to a search on Google. I seem to remember that they have a 3/4 thick endgrain system.

    I can buy red oak 3/4 T&G strip flooring for 1.99 a Sq Ft. I think that could be glued down with liquid nails?
    Or
    I helped rip out an oak floor in a basement that was nailed in the traditional way to 3/4 plywood that was anchored to the concrete with those power nails. That floor held up well. It came out cause the renovation was for something else. I though it was a shame to remove it.
     
  4. threepiston
    Joined: Jan 11, 2009
    Posts: 13

    threepiston
    Member
    from illinois

    OSB would not work well, in my opinion. Its pieces lift off easily as it ages.

    My carpenter Dad's garage sat for 10 years with no siding. The Tyvek wrap degraded, and the OSB began to look like wasps had built it.

    See if you can find some construction company that is discarding 3/4" tongue and groove plywood that's used to pour foundation. That stuff is durable, and has some sort of oil in it that keeps it sealed well.
     
  5. Blue666
    Joined: Feb 22, 2009
    Posts: 4

    Blue666
    Member

    You didn't mention the square footage of your concrete floors but have you considered diamond polishing (http://www.terrco.com/ ). Diamond polishing produces a very smoth, dust free floor. Many companies can do this around the country & it produces a unique look based upon the concrete aggregate.

    I used to work for nationwide truck leasing firm. We tried paint, epoxy, super expensive micro leveling. The paint peeled, the epoxy gouged & spalled, the micro leveling was bogus. The diamond grinding with an annual sealing worked the best.

    Our best floors were diamond ground with imbedded PEX heat tubing. All the mechanics wanted to lay around on the warm floors.
     
  6. Dale Fairfax
    Joined: Jan 10, 2006
    Posts: 2,585

    Dale Fairfax
    Member Emeritus

    So did all the other GM plants. Read my post.


     
  7. That's sweet.

     
  8. plym49
    Joined: Aug 9, 2008
    Posts: 2,803

    plym49
    Member
    from Earth

    That's great information, thanks. Sounds like Advantech would be the way to go.
     
  9. plym49
    Joined: Aug 9, 2008
    Posts: 2,803

    plym49
    Member
    from Earth

    Let me see if I can get it locally and if not, I will let you know.
     
  10. plym49
    Joined: Aug 9, 2008
    Posts: 2,803

    plym49
    Member
    from Earth

    I'm sure there are many ways. Not too long ago I was in an old Pratt and Whitney factory building in Connecticut. The blocks - oak, I think - were a few inches long and they were set in tar on a rough-poured concrete base. They were pretty flat but not perfect; also God knows how many years old. I suppose you could just run a floor sander over them to level them out. I would imagine it is important to set them in tar so that they don't wick in water from the bottom.
     
  11. plym49
    Joined: Aug 9, 2008
    Posts: 2,803

    plym49
    Member
    from Earth

    Damn, that is nice. A buddy of mine lives in the oldest house in these parts. Still on its original foundation, a few hundred years old. This is the sort of shed that would go on his property. (I'd sure like it, too.)
     
  12. plym49
    Joined: Aug 9, 2008
    Posts: 2,803

    plym49
    Member
    from Earth

    I know there are some fancy ways to handle concrete, but in the end it is just cold concrete that gets stained and cracks. I really would like to do it in wood.
     
  13. ems customer service
    Joined: Nov 15, 2006
    Posts: 2,580

    ems customer service
    Member

    we have these in our shop. wood block floors, welding cutting not much of a problems the blocks are kind hard to start on fire, actually we never have,

    they are still avaiable new, cost about $4-$5 per sq ft, they are held down by roof cement and hammerd tight against each other the last row is the bicth ans you need to the key pieces to hold er tight, new bocks fit vvery tight,

    they are great insulation keeps the place warm and all machinery can be bolted on top of the floor, they were used to keep the vibration of old machines from shaking the buildings apart, god for the back and knees to pm me if you need address of supplier they are in warren mich
     
  14. The shop I make my living in has 5/4 oak floors.They're great on the feet and back but forget about useing a creepy!My family has run a blacksmith-welding shop with wood floors since 1904 without a fire,we can even get insurance!
     
  15. 39 Ford
    Joined: Jan 22, 2006
    Posts: 1,558

    39 Ford
    Member

    I worked for years outside in a stone/dirt driveway. I now have a garage with a concrete floor and feel "big time" every time I'm in there. If you want wood go for it.
     
  16. krooser
    Joined: Jul 25, 2004
    Posts: 4,583

    krooser
    Member

    I was in Cleveland several years ago at a shippers dock and saw the old wood block floors for the first time. The floor was at least 100 years old and it carried a lot of fork lift traffic... pretty amazing how well it had held up.

    My buddy Scott completely restored his '67 Mustang in the old carriage house next to his house.... full wooden floor in that building. I always like to gi visit when he was doing that project... nice, cozy atmosphere.
     
  17. 39cent
    Joined: Apr 4, 2006
    Posts: 1,569

    39cent
    Member
    from socal

    I worked at the Kaiser, Fontana steel mill electric motor shop for many years and we had a floor like that. [it was the leftover machine shop from the Boulder Dam project in the 30,s] Working all day mostly standing and walking, that type of flooring was a lot easier on the feet and legs. It did provide protection to parts and tools that were dropped, We used a lotta heat pulling big couplings with torches and such, and if the heated grease caught fire we would just spray on it with water, and that would put out the fire. [I don't think they would let ya do that anymore]. One problem was if it got a lotta water on it the wood stated swelling and it would form a big mound! gggg
     
  18. 39cent
    Joined: Apr 4, 2006
    Posts: 1,569

    39cent
    Member
    from socal

    ohhh but the mound would go down by the next day after drying out! gggg
     
  19. Special Ed
    Joined: Nov 1, 2007
    Posts: 6,944

    Special Ed
    Member

    I installed floors and floorcoverings for over 33 years. Go with wood. You will need a vapor barrier to eliminate hydrostatic pressure, though. Doesn't matter if water is not an issue, as it will become one. PM me if you have any questions...
     
  20. moparcory617
    Joined: Jan 25, 2009
    Posts: 56

    moparcory617
    Member
    from tuttle ok

    man i have to agree with you about the concrete. I like the look of the wood floor. I am planing on building a shop. but think the metal ones have no style. it will be an old red loft barn style made of wood. but i never thought of a wood floor. NOW I AM. lol
     
  21. I worked in the GE Cleveland Equipment Plant and the huge machine shop had wood block floors probably 80 years old at the time. One of the reasons for that kind of floor is the the metal chips from the cutting machines wood go into the wood instead of going into the soles and heels of work shoes. It gave it a nice silver-black patina around the mills and lathes.
     
  22. gas pumper
    Joined: Aug 13, 2007
    Posts: 2,956

    gas pumper
    Member

    Couple of more thoughts on the wood floors.

    I worked at a Corning glass plant in the 70's that the machine shop and part of the production floor was wood block. Very cool.

    And I spent 20 years working out of a 40 ft trailer, set on the ground. It had white oak flooring, as most trailers had. I cut, welded and sparked on that floor and never had a problem with fire on the floor. The weld berries would just roll across the floor. shop rags and leaves would burn, but not the floor. Plenty of oil on that one, too.

    Here's the supplier I found: http://www.kaswell.com/woodblock.htm
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2009
  23. fordb132
    Joined: Sep 23, 2006
    Posts: 46

    fordb132
    Member
    from Norway

    I have the exact same experience as Mr. Gas Pumper with my 2" thick wooden floor in my shop.I have to cover it up a little when I use the plasma.Paint it every other year to keep it brighter.Heavy use since 1957.
     

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  24. SlamIam
    Joined: Oct 8, 2007
    Posts: 449

    SlamIam
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Best place I ever worked was my grandfather's barn with an oak plank floor on a redwood support grid. The floor was just slightly springy, and always warm in winter. As I recall, he did all his welding outside on dirt. I can envision a new garage built with a center wall dividing front from back, with a wood-floored parking area behind the front doors and a concrete-floored fab area in the rear with its own doors.
     
  25. 39 All Ford
    Joined: Sep 15, 2008
    Posts: 1,531

    39 All Ford
    Member
    from Benton AR

    I worry about fire enough in my garage....

    If I had wooden floors I would not sleep nights....

    I try hard to keep combustables off the floor where most sparks settle, a combustable floor would be problematic for me.

    It is not like I often weld or grind inside, I generally always do this stuff outdoors, but sparks don't always go where we want...

    My garage is attached to the place where my family sleeps, no wooden floor for me...

    Oh,,, it does not matter how many people say a wooden floor is not a fire hazard in a garage, even if this is true, (might be) I still would not sleep at night.
     
  26. Von Rigg Fink
    Joined: Jun 11, 2007
    Posts: 13,426

    Von Rigg Fink
    Member
    from Garage

    i would think home owners insurance would have a heart attack and charge you up the butt for insurance..especially if the garage or shop was anywhere near the home or attached..no way for me...
    concrete dont burn, and who cares about stains? or cracks, hell with wood blocks, you got a million cracks! as if that wood isnt going to suck up paint or oil spills? come on..romance is for the bedroom not the shop floor...un less she likes it that way
     
  27. NoSurf
    Joined: Jul 26, 2002
    Posts: 4,176

    NoSurf
    Member

    Yep. My Dad worked for Pratt for 25 years. When they had open house when I was a kid I can remember the wooden floors. Oak blocks on end. Neat stuff.

    My wife's Grandfather owned a Ford tractor dealership in a small town in Kansas. The building was an old opera house. They laid an oak floor above the sloped seating area and worked on tractors on that floor.
     
  28. JeffreyJames
    Joined: Jun 13, 2007
    Posts: 16,612

    JeffreyJames
    Member
    from SUGAR CITY

    I am with everybody else. Wood floors are the Boss Hoss. I can't tell you how many times I have thought about having them eventually. I'm not going to run them until my garage is not connected to the house though which only seems like good judgement. Who wants their personal garage to not have any character. I think the personality of a wooden floor or other things gets people motivated.
     
  29. zbuickman
    Joined: Dec 9, 2007
    Posts: 466

    zbuickman
    Member

    the other thing wood floors are EXCELENT for is Dryness rust prevention.... I have a partial wood floor where I store my car.... no condensation on the car anymore and I even have a peice of cold rolled 7 gauge (future door header) sitting on it. with NO flash rust on it and its been there for two years. That says ALOT here in WI:) Wood floors are the SHIT
     

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