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Technical Will JB Weld survive in an oil pan?

Discussion in 'Traditional Hot Rods' started by jkeesey, Nov 13, 2013.

  1. rustang
    Joined: Sep 10, 2009
    Posts: 710

    rustang
    Member

    I've used JB weld on the oilpan of my Chev 1500 plow truck and it held up fine.... struck me odd tho that the oilpan would even rust through on a '91 truck....lmao...
     
    seb fontana likes this.
  2. Fullraceflathead
    Joined: Apr 27, 2012
    Posts: 23

    Fullraceflathead
    Member

    If I was repairing that, I would make up all new lines. Why because the old ones most likely work hardened from the engine vibration. If they are work hardened they will continue to fail. That engine is basically NOT replaceable, especially for the cost of some New Copper lines.
    I'm not trying to sound negative, just my 2 cents on how I would go about fixing it.
     
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  3. R Pope
    Joined: Jan 23, 2006
    Posts: 3,309

    R Pope
    Member

    I know a guy who has an R John Deere tractor. A wrist pin moved and gouged the cylinder wall badly. He filled the groove with...wait for it...good ol' JB Weld! ground it smooth, honed the cylinder and stuck it back together. Been running for years. He even took the head off a few years later and everything was copacetic. Granted, the old antique doesn't put in any 16 hour days in the field any more, but he makes all the tractor pulls with it.
     
    Truck64 likes this.
  4. woodbutcher
    Joined: Apr 25, 2012
    Posts: 3,252

    woodbutcher
    Member

    :D Silver solder should be more than sufficient.Thats how carbide teeth are attached to carbide tooth circular saw blades.There is some pretty heavy contact stress on those teeth.
    Good luck.Have fun.Be safe.
    Leo
     
  5. banjorear
    Joined: Jul 30, 2004
    Posts: 3,867

    banjorear
    Member

    It's common practice to use JB Weld to smooth out pitted cylinder bores in old hit & miss motors.

    Granted, they are low RPM and not a crucial application, but works like a charm.
     
  6. Id make a new line, or risk a "my 6 banger has no oil pressure" thread. That said, JB will hold up to the oil once cured,,, but Id still make a new line if it were me.
     
  7. I'm confused! Why does this need to be soldered inside the engine? It looks like it gets assembled with flare fittings.
     
  8. I love JB weld ,but I would not use it for that job. Make a new one and silver solder it be sure to use the right type of tubing. That way it will be good thoughts in the back of your head. I looked at the pic again any good A/C refrigeration shop should be able to do this and have the reducer cone fitting.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2013
  9. 2OLD2FAST
    Joined: Feb 3, 2010
    Posts: 3,393

    2OLD2FAST
    Member
    from illinois

    Just to be sure , you know you can't successfully silver solder something that's already been "soft soldered", better to start fresh !!
    dave
     
  10. Use 35% silver solder not the crappy 5%. Once you solder it with the silver solder, the solder joints will be stronger than the copper itself. ;)
     
  11. Rattle Trap
    Joined: May 11, 2012
    Posts: 358

    Rattle Trap
    Member

    I would make up a new piece and silver solder it together. A co worker of mine did a high pressure line for an AC unit with copper line and we tested it to 500 psi. It held fine.
     
  12. teddisnoke
    Joined: May 24, 2005
    Posts: 1,138

    teddisnoke
    Member
    from So Cal

    I know someone with a nine-second Ford, with some JB weld in his oil pan, we are still waiting for it to fail. Not on a load-inducing part, but still subjected to high heat/cool circumstances...
     
  13. texoutsider
    Joined: Jul 6, 2005
    Posts: 826

    texoutsider
    Member
    from Frisco, Tx

    I would tap and fit AN fittings and make up flex hoses for it.
     
  14. inthweedz
    Joined: Mar 29, 2011
    Posts: 438

    inthweedz
    Member

    Silver solder is the word.. Three or four previous posts mention it as well.. Forget the JB Weld..
    Soft solder will fracture with vibration, heat , expansion and contraction..
    If you still have the pipe off, as in the photo, I would securely support the pipe and weld each pipe joint (one at a time) which would also be secured while welding to hold it while the joint material is hardening off..
    As for welding in place, as long as there is no oil in the pipe, and the surrounding area is wiped clean, and the welder knows what he's doing, apart from oil smoke/fumes there wont be any problem as most of the heat is directed at the joint..
    The only problem with doing it in place is I would want to take it off again to wash/blow out all the roasted carbon rubbish that has cooked off the inner wall of the copper pipe..
    Even if a new pipe was made up in place, it would still need taking off and cleaning out..
     
  15. Tutashen
    Joined: Aug 8, 2015
    Posts: 23

    Tutashen

    jb weld will break down over time and the methanol in gas now will help it ,i have had a crack in a road racing oilpan for yrs jb welded it three times then got mad lifted the motor took the pan off an migged it,the last jb weld patch thingy came off in one piece with one swipe of a putty knife an that was draining the oil letting it sit grinding cleaning with brake clean then jb weld, not a side of the road patch an hope to get home, far as i can tell it breaks down over time and that's one thing on the outside of an engine a completely different one inside ! have a fire extinguisher handy an braze it up right, you can put out a fire replacing something that is no longer made is another, and they weld gas an oil pipelines all the time while they are full to fix leaks so it's not a 2 ft pipe full of natural gas your welding is it .
     
  16. Unfortunately the OP has not been on here for two years. He should of used Flex Seal…you can make a boat out of that stuff. :)
     
  17. anthony myrick
    Joined: Sep 4, 2009
    Posts: 8,113

    anthony myrick
    Member

    My pan has JB on it.
    No leaks. Seen motorcycle cases patched up with it. Ran forever.
    I probably would prefer the solder for your situation
     
  18. seb fontana
    Joined: Sep 1, 2005
    Posts: 7,031

    seb fontana
    Member
    from ct

    Almost 8 yr old post..
     
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  19. lippy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2006
    Posts: 5,562

    lippy
    Member
    from Ks

    Crap. and here I thought I would post something relevant. But....wait for it, a 1929 with pressurized oiling? :D
     
  20. Well, we were able to witness the second longest sentence ever written.
     
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  21. Vics stuff
    Joined: May 24, 2014
    Posts: 372

    Vics stuff
    Member

    With what I see there. I would glass bead the repair areas , wash with acetone , tin it with paste and silver solder and make the repair. Not a problem.
    Vic
     
  22. Bert Kollar
    Joined: Jan 10, 2007
    Posts: 1,044

    Bert Kollar
    Member

    I have a very expensive hemi block that has two spots of rotten cast iron in side the block exposed to oil. I researched EVERY Mfg of patch type products I could find and NONE of them would guarantee me that their product would hold up in an oily condition. I had to machine a new block
     
  23. sloppy jalopies
    Joined: Jun 29, 2015
    Posts: 4,780

    sloppy jalopies
    Member

    i found J B QUIK was more brittle than J B WELD...
     
  24. Atwater Mike
    Joined: May 31, 2002
    Posts: 10,635

    Atwater Mike
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    J B Nimble came out with Quik, I remember like it was yesterday...and it was a jack jump higher than the candlestick weld.
     
    williebill and Desoto291Hemi like this.
  25. deathrowdave
    Joined: May 27, 2014
    Posts: 2,648

    deathrowdave
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from NKy

    I have JB Welded lots of stuff in the past with great results . I would only use it where I can monitor its holding strength . Inside an oil pan is not the place for me . Silver solder or braze is your answer for this repair , just my opinion.
     
  26. lippy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2006
    Posts: 5,562

    lippy
    Member
    from Ks

    I have noticed on the HAMB all the rats have jumped ship. BYE.
     
  27. Jeff Engelman
    Joined: Jul 21, 2019
    Posts: 2

    Jeff Engelman
    Member
    from Mead, CO

  28. Kevin Ardinger
    Joined: Aug 31, 2019
    Posts: 338

    Kevin Ardinger

    I would solder it as well but if you all knew how many transbrake valvebodies I built with Jb Weld in the passages you would crap! I guess the difference is it’s cast aluminum not copper.
     
  29. 2OLD2FAST
    Joined: Feb 3, 2010
    Posts: 3,393

    2OLD2FAST
    Member
    from illinois

    LOL
     

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