Register now to get rid of these ads!

History Why was wood used in car bodies?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by sgtlethargic, Jan 4, 2022.

  1. choptop40
    Joined: Dec 23, 2009
    Posts: 4,230

    choptop40
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    replaced the door wood in 36 Buick 3 window with kit from David Entler in 1992. back then was 500.00... cut slits in door perimeter to get the new wood in...then weld them ... doors closed like new after the installation with a precise adjustment of the turnbuckle.
     
    31 B'ville and alanp561 like this.
  2. alanp561
    Joined: Oct 1, 2017
    Posts: 2,223

    alanp561
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Startd out as wood. Save the matchbook covers, they're becoming obsolete. How else are you going to set your points at .0015 in an emergency?
     
  3. alanp561
    Joined: Oct 1, 2017
    Posts: 2,223

    alanp561
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Morgan still builds the three wheeler. 120 years and still going.
     
    Tman likes this.
  4. alanp561 just grab a thick business card, that should get you close to .015
     
    alanp561 likes this.
  5. alanp561
    Joined: Oct 1, 2017
    Posts: 2,223

    alanp561
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Yeah, I showed that to my son one day on a real old Ford powered welding machine with burned points. He was griping about how long it was going to take to get a mechanic out there. He learned something that day.
     
    5window and hotrodjack33 like this.
  6. Look at some of the wood used in cars back then. They had the ability to steam it into shapes fairly easily and the craftsmanship to get them trimmed to size, I bet a lot was cut-to-fit. Which by 1930, that technology took up a lot of time. Ford and others liked to make a part, put it in stock and install it on the assembly line.
     
    alanp561 likes this.
  7. no55mad
    Joined: Dec 15, 2006
    Posts: 1,920

    no55mad
    Member

    Heard a story that Ford supplied wood to Chevrolet and in that contract, Ford would supply the wood but Chevrolet could not build a V8 until 1955.
     
  8. denis4x4
    Joined: Apr 23, 2005
    Posts: 3,885

    denis4x4
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Colorado

    Have a lot of respect for those early automotive wood workers. When I did a 6-1/2" cab extension on my '29 CCPU, I had to fabricate the roof wood from scratch using white oak.

    8A3B5614-F953-4A4B-8BED-E1C950F8C5D9.jpeg
     
    Stogy likes this.
  9. 5window
    Joined: Jan 29, 2005
    Posts: 8,743

    5window
    Member

    Ford liked total control. The St Paul plant was built over a pure white sand mine that Ford made windshield glass from :
    https://www.startribune.com/did-for...d-mined-from-beneath-st-paul-plant/600006618/
     
  10. You are two years younger than I am and I completely agree! They don’t teach cool fun stuff like that in our schools anymore. Little Truckdoctor may not realize it, but here’s lucky to have Dad and I to teach him cool, useful, stuff like how to work with your hands.
     
    210superair likes this.
  11. indyjps
    Joined: Feb 21, 2007
    Posts: 4,835

    indyjps
    Member

    Both GM and Ford owned large tracts of forest. No reason to change until they had to.

    I disagree with " inability to deep draw" panels. Look at any 20's-30's fender and it has more draw depth than anything being made on modern cars.

    Cost of steel was higher than wood. Let me qualify by saying multiple stampings to generate a box section with same strength as wood was more costly.

    No one gave a shit.... wood was acceptable structural material for buggies and then cars going 40mph. It wasn't a concern.
     
  12. error404
    Joined: Dec 11, 2012
    Posts: 337

    error404
    Member
    from CA

    I'm almost finished replacing all the wood in my 33 Chevy pickup with steel.
     
  13. SR100
    Joined: Nov 26, 2013
    Posts: 1,005

    SR100
    Member

    This smells like an urban legend.
     
  14. 5window
    Joined: Jan 29, 2005
    Posts: 8,743

    5window
    Member

    Wide rolling mills didn't become available until the 30's and then Chevy quickly came out with their one piece Turret Top in '35. I think it was production capabilities rather than collusion that held things back. Still, if you've got documentation, Henry was a wheeler-dealer.
     
  15. Budget36
    Joined: Nov 29, 2014
    Posts: 8,386

    Budget36
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    When referring to “turret top” is that a fully formed roof with just window openings?
     
    Stogy likes this.
  16. 5window
    Joined: Jan 29, 2005
    Posts: 8,743

    5window
    Member

    Stogy and Budget36 like this.
  17. enjenjo
    Joined: Mar 2, 2001
    Posts: 2,566

    enjenjo
    Member
    from swanton oh

    1960 Peterbilt cabs still were wood framed.
     
    Stogy likes this.
  18. finn
    Joined: Jan 25, 2006
    Posts: 980

    finn
    Member

    That legend collides with the fact that Chevy had a v8 car in production in 1917.
     
    Stogy likes this.
  19. finn
    Joined: Jan 25, 2006
    Posts: 980

    finn
    Member

    Fenders were much smaller pieces that automobile tops. You have to go back to what size rolls the Mills could produce, given the infrastructure and technology of the times, and the size of the presses. It takes a very big press to handle something the size of an automobile roof.

    Many fenders were multi piece stamping, welded, leaded, and metal finished.
     
    Stogy likes this.
  20. Mo rust
    Joined: Mar 11, 2012
    Posts: 583

    Mo rust
    Member

    Also it seems that some of the lower production number cars were the slowest to get away from wood. My 36 Ford roadster has wood in the doors and cowl. My 32 three window coupes had quite a bit of wood too. Most of it was structural though
     
    Stogy likes this.
  21. pitman
    Joined: May 14, 2006
    Posts: 5,151

    pitman

    Decimalpoint moves right, ~
    One space/column.
     
    Stogy and WalkerMD like this.
  22. Heard stories that ford used to rent the use of a press from the air force in Arizona to stamp out fenders for the 32 ford .
    Have you ever driven a 33 34 chevrolet ,as quiet as a new cadillac !!!
     
  23. 31 B'ville
    Joined: Feb 7, 2009
    Posts: 326

    31 B'ville
    Member
    from SE Pa
    1. All Things Pontiac

    Replaced all of the wood structure in my '31 Pontiac with a kit from autowood.net. 20150531_174924.jpg 20151128_161418.jpg
     
    Rolleiflex and Stogy like this.
  24. finn
    Joined: Jan 25, 2006
    Posts: 980

    finn
    Member

    There wasn’t an Air Force in 1932. It didn’t come around for another 10-15 years.

    1947….
     

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2021 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.