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Whats the best "trick" or tech tip a mentor showed you?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by The Mandrill, Jan 11, 2010.

  1. A short piece of rubber hose can serve as a depth gauge/bumper when slid over a drill bit.
     
  2. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 2,911

    Boneyard51
    Member

    Aquire a 12 volt/cigar lighter powered air compressor. Keep it with you, will save you many times, or at least it has me.





    Bones
     
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  3. Beanscoot
    Joined: May 14, 2008
    Posts: 1,082

    Beanscoot
    Member

    "my car has UNC, UNF, Metric and standard."

    What exactly are "standard" bolts? I always thought UNC and UNF are "standard".
     
  4. MantulaMan
    Joined: Jun 19, 2018
    Posts: 23

    MantulaMan

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  5. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 2,911

    Boneyard51
    Member

    Do not know if it’s right, but in my neck of the woods growing up, USS, Standard, course were one type of thread. Fine and SAE were the other thread. Metric was just something we heard about and occasionally British Whitworth came up on the occasional Triumph motorcycle...... but time changes things.........




    Bones
     
  6. Truck64
    Joined: Oct 18, 2015
    Posts: 3,699

    Truck64
    Member
    from Ioway

    That's the nice thing about standards, there are so many to choose from.
     
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  7. In 1959, I was doing my first chop, a 4 inch chop on a 34 Ford 1/2 ton, and one of my friends was a body man. He taught me how to shrink stretched panels by using a torch, sponge, and how to finish straightening using heat with a hammer and a dolly. He frequently told me, that patience was the key, and that it is better to under do the process than to over do it.
    My chop turned out great, and the experience got me over the fear of working metal panels.
    He passed a few years ago, a real artist with metal.
    Bob
     
  8. Tri-power37
    Joined: Feb 10, 2019
    Posts: 313

    Tri-power37
    Member

    Learned this working in a chrome plating shop. If you have a lot of little bits that need glass beading - take a coffee can cut a hole in the plastic lid that matches the glass beader nozzle end- quickly tape the lid on. Punch a bunch of small holes in the opposite end to let the glass bead fall out . Place your small pieces in the can put the nozzle in the lid hole and shake ,shake , shake while blasting away. It will quickly get the small pieces perfect! Eventually the bottom of the coffee can will blow out but it works way better than trying to hold each piece separately and destroying the expensive glass beading gloves.
     
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  9. oldpl8s
    Joined: Apr 11, 2007
    Posts: 1,257

    oldpl8s
    Member

    When hammering dents out of sheet metal, resist the temptation to pound it really hard. This stretches the metal out.
     
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  10. Ron Brown
    Joined: Jul 6, 2015
    Posts: 1,284

    Ron Brown
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Ive used this several times. If you have a car with a cigarette lighter, ive taken the element out and mounted a push/pull switch behind it to use as a hidden kill switch. In to run out to kill... convenient and no ones the wiser




    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
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  11. pirate
    Joined: Jun 29, 2006
    Posts: 352

    pirate
    Member
    from Alabama

    Take a scrap of plywood and screw it onto a section of 2 x 4. Place In vise as in picture. Gives you a little extra height so you can see better and also you don’t have to bend over when working on small jobs.
    upload_2019-6-1_21-8-54.jpeg
     
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  12. pirate
    Joined: Jun 29, 2006
    Posts: 352

    pirate
    Member
    from Alabama

    Get a door mat with little rubber post sticking up similar to mat on left side of vise. When you are taking apart jobs with small parts, small screws, springs the parts get caught in the mat rather then rolling off work bench onto the floor. Door mat also will contain some fluids so work bench stays cleaner. You can clean mats with hose or just throw away. If you know any one in the bar/tavern business bar mats work even better.
    upload_2019-6-1_21-24-45.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2019
  13. patterg2003
    Joined: Sep 21, 2014
    Posts: 533

    patterg2003

    Patience. My Dad taught me to have patience with the work whether it was inanimate or animate. If the job was going bad to step away and take a break. Going back after a break it always seemed to go better. Patience has gotten better over the years with the inanimate but sometimes as I have gotten older the animates are a test.
     
  14. Flathead Dave
    Joined: Mar 21, 2014
    Posts: 2,380

    Flathead Dave
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from So. Cal.

    I remember when I was three years old...My dad said.."DAMNITDAVID!...YOU DON'T LICK THE LIGHT SOCKET!" And my Uncle said, "Hell, What's it going to hurt?"
     
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  15. hotrod1948
    Joined: Jan 17, 2011
    Posts: 361

    hotrod1948
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Milton, WI

    Make the same piece out of some quartyer inch or thicker plate and you will have a small welding table/fixture.
     
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  16. Tri-power37
    Joined: Feb 10, 2019
    Posts: 313

    Tri-power37
    Member

    The very best solution I’ve ever used as a penetrant on rusty bolts by far is a 50/50 mix of acetone and automatic transmission fluid. Put some in a spray bottle and let it soak on rusty bolts overnight it will blow your mind! Oh yeah it is also highly flammable so be careful.
     
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  17. rgdavid
    Joined: Feb 3, 2014
    Posts: 346

    rgdavid
    Member

    The best thing i learnt was from my grandad, he used to say...
    " if you work slow you work fast"
    Do it right first time.
     
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  18. I use a shovel under the tire. Lots of mechanical advantage, minimum stress on the back.
    Bob
     
  19. 49ratfink
    Joined: Feb 8, 2004
    Posts: 17,378

    49ratfink
    Member
    from California

    I can honestly say I have never had a "mentor".
     
  20. When pulling out a fender, or other sheet metal, after an accident, think about how it got bent, and then do the opposite. It might sound dumb, but it can save a lot of work.
    Attaching a puller of some kind to the point of impact and gently pulling while gently using the hammer and dolly on the crease, will sometimes restore a fender that you thought was going to have to be replaced.
    Bob
     
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  21. My mentor told me to always read the HAMB for the best advise on a project.
     
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  22. rockable
    Joined: Dec 21, 2009
    Posts: 2,640

    rockable
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I saw a similar mention to this but not exactly. When installing rubber pieces and grommets, use liquid dishwashing detergent (like Dawn) as a lubricant. It makes the job go as slick as snot on a doorknob. The 2nd best part is it washes right off!
     
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  23. 6sally6
    Joined: Feb 16, 2014
    Posts: 803

    6sally6
    Member

    Buddy told me this one.
    "when re-installing chrome trim around windshield and back glass it can be a real pain to get the trim to slide under the hold down clips and not scratch the new paint.
    He cuts a small piece of a plastic milk carton and slides that under the clips.(mark each one with a magic marker) The plastic lets the chrome slide easier under the clip and the magic marker marks the position of each clip. Saves scratching up your new paint job When done....just pull the plastic tabs out with some needle nose pliers".
    6sally6
     
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  24. 6sally6
    Joined: Feb 16, 2014
    Posts: 803

    6sally6
    Member

    :cool:
     
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  25. Tri-power37
    Joined: Feb 10, 2019
    Posts: 313

    Tri-power37
    Member

    Awesome Trick !!!I don’t know if this has been mentioned but we did this trick at work for the first time today and it really works well. When reinstalling a transmission take some scrap bolts that fits the bellhousing 2 to 4 inches long -depending . Cut the heads off- round the ends off -and install in the bellhousing (finger tight). Grease the studs up a small bit. When we reinstalled the trans it slid on in one— yes one—easy push. It worked so good we did the same trick for the transfer case at the end of the trans( Toyota 4x4). Slid on one easy push! No fighting no swearing and these pieces were heavy! Think of them as really long dowel pins that line everything up before they need to be lined up.
     
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  26. Bandit Billy
    Joined: Sep 16, 2014
    Posts: 5,556

    Bandit Billy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    "Crown Royal is for drinkin, Black Velvet is for mixin damn it!" - Gary Sr. a wise mentor of mine.
     
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  27. atch
    Joined: Sep 3, 2002
    Posts: 4,266

    atch
    Member

    Back to the top; it's been 6 months now.

    I'm pretty certain that there are more tricks out there that haven't been shared yet.
     
  28. Use a cut off broom stick as a drift to remove radiator hoses from a rusty water pump. Thanks Verley!
     
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