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Technical what would you do with a 3d printer??

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by revkev6, Nov 18, 2015.

  1. clem
    Joined: Dec 20, 2006
    Posts: 2,860

    clem
    Member

    That is amazing !
     
  2. toreadorxlt
    Joined: Feb 27, 2008
    Posts: 733

    toreadorxlt
    Member
    from Nashua, NH

    SLS with Nylon 6 material. I dont know if a home printer will be strong enough. Shapeways can do what you need with a laser sintering machine.


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    dash vents straight out of an objet Eden printer.
    [​IMG]
    blue jig was 3d printed to place a balljoint cup exact dimensions/angles from factory. drop it in one way its factory, the other is alterted for travel.
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2015
    lothiandon1940 and patmanta like this.
  3. patmanta
    Joined: May 10, 2011
    Posts: 3,535

    patmanta
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Woburn, MA
    1. MASSACHUSETTS HAMB

    Oh, you've got access to a SERIOUS machine, NICE! Do you smooth the ridges out on the radius heads before you run them or is that unnecessary?

    I would imagine one made with a home machine would look like a tamped out cigar with the first couple whacks.
     
  4. toreadorxlt
    Joined: Feb 27, 2008
    Posts: 733

    toreadorxlt
    Member
    from Nashua, NH

    the whole world has access to a serious machine... shapeways.com make a file, upload it, pay, wait a few weeks or so!
     
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  5. patmanta
    Joined: May 10, 2011
    Posts: 3,535

    patmanta
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Woburn, MA
    1. MASSACHUSETTS HAMB

    I JUST saw that site when I queried 3D Printed Quick Change to see if it had been done. It has apparently, but only in scale for model builders from what I saw. Still pretty cool, I was previously totally unaware of that site.

    Given the huge price tag on V8 QC centers, and the fact it seems Winters doesn't want to sell them without selling you the whole rear end, that route might someday be economical. It looks like their print resolution is VERY high, so there wouldn't be a much need for filler to make a mold from something like that. Still really challenging to make let alone pour correctly, I don't think I'd do it, but something like a custom cap would be pretty sweet...
     
  6. patmanta
    Joined: May 10, 2011
    Posts: 3,535

    patmanta
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Woburn, MA
    1. MASSACHUSETTS HAMB

  7. Me? I would like to make up some tail light lenses for my '47 Ford coupe. Either some extreme bubble lenses or a pair with 2 bullets, similar to the 1951 Ford lenses. Hopefully I could retain the existing stock pods to mount them onto.
    I'm not that clever so I guess it's never going to happen.
     
    LAROKE likes this.
  8. ken bogren
    Joined: Jul 6, 2010
    Posts: 671

    ken bogren
    Member

    Yeah, a good 3D scanner is probably the key to popping a lot of old car stuff.
     
  9. ken bogren
    Joined: Jul 6, 2010
    Posts: 671

    ken bogren
    Member

    Here's a link to a video

     
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  10. Phil1934
    Joined: Jun 24, 2001
    Posts: 2,703

    Phil1934
    Member

  11. wsdad
    Joined: Dec 31, 2005
    Posts: 1,252

    wsdad
    Member

    If I had enough money to buy a 3D printer, I'd buy a CNC machine instead. They start with a peice of metal (or other material) and cut away what isn't needed. This allows them to have much higher tolerances, faster production, cheaper materials and drastically stronger materials.

    As cool as 3D printers are, you just can't make anything on them out of forged steel or sheetmetal.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2015
  12. Bearcat_V8
    Joined: Sep 21, 2011
    Posts: 373

    Bearcat_V8
    Member
    from Dexter, MI

    I work for a supplier company in the auto business. We have an SLA printer here at work for prototyping various plastic parts. It gets us close enough to verify fit and function and in some cases do mechanical testing. The finish quality of the parts is rather good.

    Having said that, we had a demo from a company here in Detroit called Synergeering. They can SLA fully functional powertrain parts such as cam covers and EFI intake manifolds. The strength and finish of their parts are indistinguishable from injection molded parts. Very impressive stuff. The technology has come a long way.

    But… that is not what I have come here to tell you. I want to tell you how they rapid prototype castings from SLA parts. (Are you paying attention, young Dane?) It works to much the same principle as lost wax or lost foam casting.

    As typical today, we start with a CAD model of the part we want to cast. To our CAD model we add all of the vents, chimneys and funnels that a foundry would put in a mold. We proceed to print our modeled part complete with said vents and such. Alternately you could print your part and vents separately and glue them together afterwards. Typically this is done with the paper printing method as opposed to the plastic type, but I assume one could use either method.

    At this point you could clean up your SLA part if you want a smooth finish on your casting.

    Now we give our part a nice thick coating of casting concrete. We then fire the concrete coated part. This does two things: 1. it kicks the concrete and 2. It burns the plastic (or paper) part out of our mold.

    We now have a hollow concrete mold with all of the funnels and vents in place. Pour molten metal into your mold and let it cool. Knock the casting concrete off of your new casting, it is ready for machine work.

    This is how the major players can get prototype castings with a 5 day turnaround from CAD to finished casting. It also allows them to evaluate their mold design before the create a production mold.
     
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  13. rusty rocket
    Joined: Oct 30, 2011
    Posts: 3,826

    rusty rocket
    Member

    As said in some above posts It would be great for protyping parts. a guy could make the part fit it to see if it would work and then have it cast or milled.
     
  14. You can 3d print the casting sand now. You can pretty much have anything cast from these, even up to large motorblocks, if you want it/can afford it.

    Basically, once you have a 3d model of what you want to make, you have lots of options. There are a huge number of places you can find online to email the model, who will send you your parts back pretty quickly.
     
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  15. bone31
    Joined: Oct 24, 2006
    Posts: 119

    bone31
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from oregon

    sell it
     
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  16. BobMcD
    Joined: Jan 25, 2013
    Posts: 322

    BobMcD
    Member

    I would sell the printer and buy some real car parts.
     
    Turnipseed likes this.
  17. patmanta
    Joined: May 10, 2011
    Posts: 3,535

    patmanta
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Woburn, MA
    1. MASSACHUSETTS HAMB

    Actually, one thing just popped into mind. You could make up radiator tubes and bends out of aluminum.

    This would be handy for one-offing drop/offset S-tubes for radiators down in front of the crossmember for sure.

    I've also been eyeing finned hot water return tubes, not so much for bling, but because my radiator is on the small side and I've got an 'every little bit' mindset, but I'm running EAB heads and they are probably too long.

    Since I'm seeing Shapeways can print in aluminum, about 10" square, I'm thinking that might be a way for me to get some custom fit plumbing on my build. They also print in casting wax, so that'd be another option.
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2015
  18. Would it work with Benjamin's? HRP

    iStock_000002627756Medium.jpg
     
  19. Automotive Stud
    Joined: Sep 26, 2004
    Posts: 4,035

    Automotive Stud
    Member

    You joined just to say that? On a five year old thread? People must be getting really bored quarantined at home.
     
  20. Atwater Mike
    Joined: May 31, 2002
    Posts: 10,084

    Atwater Mike
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    My, Doug...5 years! Think of how far ahead they are NOW... Maybe print a cure for covid
     
    Desoto291Hemi likes this.
  21. jnaki
    Joined: Jan 1, 2015
    Posts: 4,496

    jnaki

    Hello,
    My son was amazed that we did not have a 3d printer. He knew that I like to tinker around with a bunch of stuff for what we normally do with our spare time. At the time of the inquiry, we were heavily involved with our toddler granddaughter and we were in constant need of parts for her little toys and dolls.

    There is so much any person can do in the garage with left over trinkets and stuff to repair or replace a valuable part for little girl’s toy or toys. (a broken joint on a tiny doll arm, a fountain that needed an interior light for a display, etc.) the whole field of tinkering was open.

    If I had a 3d printer, I would start a small business of making 1939 Ford deluxe, 1940 standard and deluxe hood latches out of something other than what the factory made. I owned two 1940 deluxe Ford Sedan Delivery versions, one a stock model with a Flathead and one stock looking with a 327 SBC. In both models during the ownership periods, 4 years as a teenager and 6 years as a 20 something, I had three chrome hood ornaments break at the most inopportune times.


    One on a highway at night when steam was coming out of the radiator in the Flathead powered version. The next two were also at night, on a date night getting gas and checking the oil. The other time was at night coming home from a long day photo shoot, also stopping for gas and a water check. They both were lifted like usual, as the hood was raised to a certain point with both hands, the metal snapped. It left me with a stub that locked the hood, but needed a normal pliers or a locking pliers to grab it to lift for opening.

    Since that time, as a teen, I had to shell out valuable rare teenage money to get a N.O.S. replacement. As a 20 something, buying a replacement at an antique Ford dealer snapped in three week’s worth of usage. The second one was purchased at a swap meet and was a sealed bag from a parts company certifying it was a N.O.S part. Was the first one a reproduction that snapped off, what about the N.O.S. model? Bad construction from the factory? It did not matter, I carried around a locking plier set, just in case.

    Bad luck? Or faulty part? My friends said it was a bad case of “Gorilla muscle” on a well worn part. It was just one of those things that happens.

    Jnaki

    The small 3d printer version would be small enough to mail in a small padded pouch or a small narrow box to keep the costs low. I would have over 100,000 people wanting my 3d printed version made out of something other than one that would break with normal usage. It would be a low key mail order business, just to keep the irons hot in the hot rod world. From the 1939 Ford deluxe version to the 1940 station wagon versions, there are a lot of people owning a Ford with that coolest grille and hood from this particular design.
    GOOD upload_2020-6-26_4-48-45.png
    thanks... @LOTHIANDON1940

    BAD upload_2020-6-26_4-50-5.png

    The 1939 De Luxe had a chrome lever that pulled out to release. The 40 is the market. upload_2020-6-27_4-24-56.png

    Look at all of the potential customers for future applications... There are probably more hiding somewhere in different builds since 1939.

     
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  22. I know he's on the HAMB but I can't remember his handle, but Quinton out of SW Missouri recently made a new 35 Ford dash waterfall from a 3D printed piece, cleaned up and chromed. It looks perfect.
     
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  23. Gearhead Graphics
    Joined: Oct 4, 2008
    Posts: 3,458

    Gearhead Graphics
    Member
    from Denver Co

    Trim, script, dash knobs, keychains. Heck its almost endless if youve got the smarts to program it.

    I certainly wouldnt make a scary "ghost" item with Beto or Joes face on it just because i could ;)
     
    patmanta likes this.
  24. madmike8
    Joined: Dec 4, 2011
    Posts: 68

    madmike8
    Member
    from Tennessee

    I printed a conversion from an efi lower intake to dual Weber idf carbs. I’m getting ready to print the final version in Carbon Fiber Polycarbonate to test on the engine for awhile. If it runs good and needs no further adjustments then I will have it cast in aluminum.
     
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  25. Kan Kustom
    Joined: Jul 20, 2009
    Posts: 2,549

    Kan Kustom
    Member

    This is cool as can be but it makes my head hurt. Where do I pay ?
     
  26. Flathead Dave
    Joined: Mar 21, 2014
    Posts: 2,877

    Flathead Dave
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from So. Cal.

    I would print a blow up doll that doesn't leak...
     
    Lloyd's paint & glass likes this.
  27. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 27,105

    The37Kid
    Member

    No interest what so ever, a MILLER TIG welder that is something I could put to good use. Bob
     
  28. gimpyshotrods
    Joined: May 20, 2009
    Posts: 17,139

    gimpyshotrods
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I have made a few thousand car parts for our R&D fleet. There is no substitute for this technology.

    I now use the lost PLA method to produce molds for cast aluminum parts. The possibilities are literally endless.

    I can borrow any part, 3D scan it, and make another one, ten, or 10,000.

    We're only set up for aluminum, but Iron or steel would not be out of the realm of possibility.

    You can chase your impossible to find parts. I will just make them.
     
  29. patmanta
    Joined: May 10, 2011
    Posts: 3,535

    patmanta
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Woburn, MA
    1. MASSACHUSETTS HAMB

    I just got a decent mid upper entry level 3D printer. The learning curve is definitely present and I am just starting to draduate from the basic slicer program (what programs the robot and tells it what path to follow, how thin to make the layer, and how much material to extrude, how fast to move, how hot to be where and when, etc.) into something more advanced with far more control. So far I have made a basic draft quality finned carb riser for a Stromberg and a 32 shell vent cover for my 3M mask that I designed in Autodesk Fusion 360. I am still printing with PLA but I have some more exotic filament including some clear and translucent red PETG to print tail light lenses with.

    20200621_150522.jpg

    Half the battle is having the 3D model, an example to take measurements from, or factory drawings to make the model from. The other half is setting the machine up with a good output file for the specific machine, ambient conditions, material used, and desired finish, then waiting an hour or twelve for it to finish and hopefully not make a critical error because a loaded dumptruck hit a pothole pout front and shook the machine. It is not as instant gratification of a process as some of you may think but it opens up a whole world of possibilities that compliment other methods and mediums of fabrication nicely. You don't need to rely on the aftermarket to reproduce that smashed bakelite or cast piece you need. As long as someone, somewhere, even you, can generate an accurate drawing or 3D model, it can be reproduced anywhere in the world a 3D printer is sitting in any quantity and a wide array of materials.

    @gimpyshotrods , what are you using to scan? I haven't gotten into that yet. I am still re-learning parametric 3D design (I've been out of that field for over a decade).

    I am absolutely going to do custom knobs for everything on my cars and probably even use glow in the dark filament. I am going to start playing with more sturdy filaments next though. I bought a machine that can handle Polycarbonate and even Nylon so I am hoping I can print carb risers that won't get soft and pliable running hot or melt/discolor from fuel exposure with something on the market. If not, I can always use the lost PLA casting method to make those sorts of things.

    20200617_144336.jpg
     
    brEad, madmike8, treb11 and 1 other person like this.
  30. madmike8
    Joined: Dec 4, 2011
    Posts: 68

    madmike8
    Member
    from Tennessee

    My project converting IDFs to an EFI intake.
     

    Attached Files:

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