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Hot Rods What would be a good ballpark guess to rebuild a Model B motor?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by rusty rocket, Jun 15, 2017.

  1. rusty rocket
    Joined: Oct 30, 2011
    Posts: 3,877

    rusty rocket
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    I did a search but didnt come up with any information. I looked at h&h and did not find anything. Just sort of wondering.
     
  2. atch
    Joined: Sep 3, 2002
    Posts: 4,461

    atch
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    Somewhere just south of the contents of Fort Knox.

    Sorry I don't have a "real" answer. A friend has his B motor in the machine shop right now. If he smoked he could light cigarettes with $20 bills and he's concerned about the cost.

    b-t-w; love your sedan.
     
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  3. 5window
    Joined: Jan 29, 2005
    Posts: 7,478

    5window
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  4. Tim: Are you talking about a 4 banger or flathead v8? I rebuilt the '46 truck motor in my '32 pickup in '12. I didn't have to bore it. Rings, bearings, thermal clean the block, gaskets. Lapped the valves at home and still spent $900 on a running motor. So, if you bore, by pistons, rings, bearings, cam, lifters, gaskets, machine work.....???? 3-4 g. Go hog wild and the sky is not the limit.
     
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  5. doliak
    Joined: Nov 14, 2007
    Posts: 166

    doliak
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  6. Call Bert's, (303) 293-3673. I think they sell Model A Motors on an exchange basis. That should give you a good first cut. The A and B motors should be about the same cost. Of course when your block ends up being cracked and you need 4 sleeves the price will go up. This might be a better question for fordbarn.com. My guess would be about $4K before you start adding special equipment. Of course you want to have it balanced and the list goes on.

    Charlie Stephens
     
  7. rusty rocket
    Joined: Oct 30, 2011
    Posts: 3,877

    rusty rocket
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    I'm asking about the model B 4 cylinder.
     
  8. rusty rocket
    Joined: Oct 30, 2011
    Posts: 3,877

    rusty rocket
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    Hey Trev, You are correct Dean slipped my mind.
     
  9. oldolds
    Joined: Oct 18, 2010
    Posts: 2,993

    oldolds
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    Most of my restorer friends tell me that a "normal" 1920's to 30's engine costs a minimum of $1000/cyl. If you are working on something odd it easily doubles. That is for stock rebuilds. All the work on old engines is considered "custom machining" by most machine shops.
     
  10. 51504bat
    Joined: May 22, 2010
    Posts: 2,020

    51504bat
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    H&H Flatheads quotes prices in their catalogue if I remember correctly.
     
  11. Hot Rods Ta Hell
    Joined: Apr 20, 2008
    Posts: 4,080

    Hot Rods Ta Hell
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    At $4000+ for (just) a rebuilt short block, I'd be shopping for an entire Model A recently restored or preferably a stalled restoration (5-8k) where the owner has already rebuilt the drivetrain and possibly chassis. You could sell off the chassis and other stock parts and come away with a clean engine and a solid body (Sedan, Pickup, etc.) to start a Hot Rod project.

    Another angle is to find a Rodder that bought a restored Coupe or Roadster just to get the body and has rolled out the sock/running chassis (hear it run) for sale at a deal to recoup some of his investment.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2017
    INVISIBLEKID, 5window and 302GMC like this.
  12. oldolds
    Joined: Oct 18, 2010
    Posts: 2,993

    oldolds
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    A Model B motor is not a Model A motor. Close, but if the guy is looking for B motor stuff He has something specific in mind.
     
  13. Hot Rods Ta Hell
    Joined: Apr 20, 2008
    Posts: 4,080

    Hot Rods Ta Hell
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    My bad. Still may apply (though harder to find). Makes the restorers cringe, but a lot of guys start with an all stock, sometimes running car or stalled project. Keep the body and pretty much sell off everything else. See it with everything from Model A's through Tri Five Chevy's.
     
  14. 5280A2
    Joined: Sep 8, 2014
    Posts: 119

    5280A2

    Check the websites for Durable Performance in Jordan Minnesota and Antique Engine Rebuilders in Skokie Illinois. There is a complete listing for Model A short and long block rebuild pricing using insert bearings that will get you in the ballpark for costs; the Skokie firm is a major supplier of insert bearings and new, forged connecting rods for A and B applications. Expect Model B to cost more due to generally higher costs for parts. If you rebuild with babbit bearings you can also expect to pay more; it's getting hard to find good babbit work in the Midwest so many folks are going with inserts.
     
  15. 5window
    Joined: Jan 29, 2005
    Posts: 7,478

    5window
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  16. bondolero
    Joined: Dec 10, 2008
    Posts: 558

    bondolero
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    I advise buying a banger motor and having it done to your liking, albeit expensive by a reputable builder. Especially if you plan on running the heck out of it (see the sport coupe banger build.)
    Cosmetically restored does not translate to your definition of mechanically sound.
    Remember a lot of restored ford owners never plan to take their car to TROG ! :D
     
  17. No offense to restorers, but would not trust any restorers version of 'rebuilt.'
     
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  18. GMC BUBBA
    Joined: Jun 15, 2006
    Posts: 3,384

    GMC BUBBA
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    Rons Machine Shandon Ohio. does a ton of them every year......
     
  19. winduptoy
    Joined: Feb 19, 2013
    Posts: 2,046

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    I would add that it depends on how you want to use it. I have always stated 'Model (A) B Ford, the engine you can spend the most on to go slow'....but I love them and money is a renewable resource.
    I would insert it if you plan to drive it at all. Piranios Antique Automotive Machine http://www.modelaparts.net/
    has parts & machine cost breakdown list.
    Antique Automotive is Skokie Ill makes insert bearings and rods and check his web site.
    If you plan to drive it, North of $4K pretty easy especially if you want a performer
    Stock, not so much

    Larry
     
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  20. 5window
    Joined: Jan 29, 2005
    Posts: 7,478

    5window
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    Cool motors, but for $4K you could pretty much get a turn-key 385HP SBC from Summit. Hard to resist for some.
     
  21. denis4x4
    Joined: Apr 23, 2005
    Posts: 3,517

    denis4x4
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    from Colorado

    All well and good, but then you have another belly button car. I'm reluctant to admit how much I've spent on the '31 A engine in my avatar. But it's a non-issue when you get the dyno slip showing 60HP at the rear wheels when the stock engine put out 40HP at the flywheel. Taking my '29 CCPU to Lincoln tomorrow for the Speedster Reunion and looking forward to the dyno run next Saturday. The engine in the CCPU is a B with an original CRAGAR head and was built at Bert's. DSC00006.JPG
     
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  22. 5window
    Joined: Jan 29, 2005
    Posts: 7,478

    5window
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    Oh, I totally agree, I was just pointing out the options. I appreciate your efforts. It's also possible to build a non-belly button car using a modified "crate" motor. After all, that's essentially what you did-took a stock motor and had it modified. There are just more modified late model SBC's than early Model A's and B's. Not looking for a fight. Have fun at the Reunion.
     
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  23. Fortunateson
    Joined: Apr 30, 2012
    Posts: 3,236

    Fortunateson
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    Did I sell mine too soon? Professionally re-built, welded and ground crank, four cylinder sleeves, etc. All too standard plus two rebuilt trannies for $2800 about tens years ago. Advertised for two years and nobody want it. Oh well....
     
  24. bondolero
    Joined: Dec 10, 2008
    Posts: 558

    bondolero
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    Amen, Ive seen mercruiser (old Nova) 4 cylinders with T5's that were mucho cool, easy to repair, and perform unbelievable.
     
  25. I can relate to your decision. I have a Mercruiser (181 cubic inch) in my AVATAR. I put it in in about 1985. The main factor in the decision is I couldn't (at that time) find anyone I trusted to rebuild a Model B engine. Everyone knew how to work on SBC's and this engine is just half of one. Plenty of power for me for the weight of the car. The nice thing is that it didn't require any irreversible modifications to the car. I may put a Model B engine back with all of the good rebuilders available today.

    Charlie Stephens
     
  26. manyolcars
    Joined: Mar 30, 2001
    Posts: 8,317

    manyolcars

    Which transmission are you using?
     
  27. I am using a '39 Ford transmission. That is more than adequate for the way I drive the car. The bolt pattern at the back to the engine is the same as a SBC and adapters are available new or used. I am running the '32 rear end. It was really a "bolt together" project (like I planned it). It is sure nice to do a conversion where you don't have a fan clearance problem. If anything my fan is too far from the radiator.

    Charlie Stephens

    IMG_8089.jpg
     
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  28. rusty rocket
    Joined: Oct 30, 2011
    Posts: 3,877

    rusty rocket
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    The reason I asked was I need to find something vintage for the project. Its a 22 dodge cowl narrowed 6 inches and a pair of 46 ford front fenders sitting on a T frame. IMG_1782.JPG IMG_1987.JPG I already have a flathead v8 car so I would like to do something a bit different.
     
  29. Ever think about a big 'ol torquie 6 cylinder?
     
  30. rusty rocket
    Joined: Oct 30, 2011
    Posts: 3,877

    rusty rocket
    Member

    I would think about a 40s Ford or Dodge flathead six for sure. I donk care for sixes but I like weird.
     

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