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What to use to drill an axle???

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by choptvan, Jan 15, 2013.

  1. choptvan
    Joined: Mar 19, 2010
    Posts: 2,161

    choptvan
    Member

    Jsutthat. Doing a gasser style build on a 60 f100. I have used hole saws. Was wondering if there was something better to use?? Instead of going through 4 saws on one axle??
     
  2. 117harv
    Joined: Nov 12, 2009
    Posts: 6,590

    117harv
    Member

    I use a hole saw to remove a slug and then and end mill bit to give it a nice clean hole at the final size.

    I get a 100 holes ot of a bit, it needs to turn slow and I use air nozzel to keep the bit cool and blow the chips away.

    I never use oil on hole saws, the chips just sit in an oil soup. The air nozzel keeps the bit MUCH cooler and removes the chips.
     

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    Last edited: Jan 15, 2013
  3. Rob Paul
    Joined: Nov 11, 2005
    Posts: 1,273

    Rob Paul
    Member

    I use a milling machine with a hole saw. I think ive done 6-8 axles with the same milwaukee hole saw. Still sharp. I think the key is having it in a really solid vise and slow speed with cutting fluid.
     
  4. tommy
    Joined: Mar 3, 2001
    Posts: 14,757

    tommy
    Member Emeritus

    [​IMG]

    7/8" hole saw and a rat tail file.
     

  5. choptvan
    Joined: Mar 19, 2010
    Posts: 2,161

    choptvan
    Member

    I use LOTS of fluid. Just wanted to be sure before I kept with the same old method and then find out there is an easier way. Never hurts to ask.
     
  6. Don's Hot Rods
    Joined: Oct 7, 2005
    Posts: 8,319

    Don's Hot Rods
    Member
    from florida

    I've done them with both holesaws and big drill bits and really saw no difference in doing it one way or the other. Slow speed and lots of lube are the key. If you are using a holesaw you should get at least the 13 or 14 holes you will be drilling out of it. Cast axles are easy to drill, forged take a little more work.

    Don
     
  7. PackardV8
    Joined: Jun 7, 2007
    Posts: 960

    PackardV8
    Member

    choptvan didn't say he was doing it with a hand-held drill motor, but if so, that's the quick way to ruin a hole saw in steel. As Rob Paul said, the workpiece held firm, the hole saw turning slowly and with cutting fluid is the pro way to go. When worked properly, a good Milwaukee, Starrett or other best quality hole saw will last a long time.

    A machine shop doing production work would use insert or carbide tooling and be making those holes as fast as the machine could advance the workpiece.

    jack vines
     
  8. choptvan
    Joined: Mar 19, 2010
    Posts: 2,161

    choptvan
    Member

    Just got access to a drill press to. A good one. So that should help out a bit.
     
  9. There are carbide tipped hole cutters available. Milwaukee calls their's "one piece steel hawg"
    Also; we used to use a compressed air "mister" that blew water based cutting fluid just like we used on the lathes (a ZEP product in this instance), this method has the best of both worlds in that it lubed, cooled, and cleared the cut.
    The biggest problem I think is getting the bit or hole saw slow enough to not burn it up (60 ft/sec for mild carbon steel). A lot of drill presses won't slow down enough. You need quite a bit of pressure in order to get a decent chip, otherwise you are just rubbing the cutting edge on the axle and you will wear the tips off. It has to be cutting properly or you won't get your mileage.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2013
  10. choptvan
    Joined: Mar 19, 2010
    Posts: 2,161

    choptvan
    Member

    thanks guys. wasn't sure of the reaction I would get based on the time of day. I appreciate it!
     
  11. We used to use a Black n Decker automotive drill ( 1/2") and a big drill bit. Did a lot of axles that way, according to what I have been told there was absolutely nothing funnier in the world than watching all 135 lbs of the beaner spinning around and around when the bit hung. I never actually saw the humor in it myself. :D
     
  12. rpu28
    Joined: Jan 17, 2006
    Posts: 190

    rpu28
    Member
    from Austin

    "The biggest problem I think is getting the bit or hole saw slow enough to not burn it up (60 ft/sec for mild carbon steel)."

    I think you must mean 60 ft/min, which is about 150 rpm for a 1.5" hole.

    60 ft/sec for a 1.5" hole is about 9000 rpm.
     
  13. OoltewahSpeedShop
    Joined: Oct 18, 2007
    Posts: 3,103

    OoltewahSpeedShop
    Member

    I use a Milwaukee Roto-Mag drill with broach type bits. Easy Peasy.
     

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  14. Cali4niaCruiser
    Joined: Aug 30, 2005
    Posts: 521

    Cali4niaCruiser
    Member

    I couldn't agree more. On a side note, when drilling cast, I dont use oil. I dont know the science, but I swear to god, the oil stops the bit in its tracks when drilling cast. Most axles are forged anyway right???

    Im sure it has been mentioned in one thread or another but just in case;
    The proper way to determine drill speed is as follows...

    4 x cutting speed / cutter diameter = RPM
     
  15. choptvan
    Joined: Mar 19, 2010
    Posts: 2,161

    choptvan
    Member

    where did you pick up your bit from?
     
  16. I went to Menards and bought a 1.125" Morse carbide hole saw. Brought it home and clamped my '32 heavy axle in the drill press and set it on slow speed...used plenty of tranny fluid for cutting oil and drilled 22 holes in it. They came out a snitch over 1.25". I found I lost one tooth from the cheapie hole saw, next to the welded seam.
     

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  17. choptvan
    Joined: Mar 19, 2010
    Posts: 2,161

    choptvan
    Member

    awesome. sounds like there are more than 2 ways to skin a cat here... Thanks again guys. the more info the better. looks like the drill press will be a life saver for sure. Never had one to use till recent.
     
  18. ago
    Joined: Oct 12, 2005
    Posts: 2,199

    ago
    Member
    from pgh. pa.

    Clamping it solid in drill press should work. Slow speed is a must. No oil is needed when machining cast iron.



    Ago
     
  19. Truckedup
    Joined: Jul 25, 2006
    Posts: 4,594

    Truckedup
    Member

    Original axles are forged steel......

    Air instead of an oil mess? I like that ,anyone else use air?
     
  20. Rob Paul
    Joined: Nov 11, 2005
    Posts: 1,273

    Rob Paul
    Member

    Ive been using cutting wax that a guy gave me. Less of a mess than cutting oil.

    Rob
     
  21. Keep
    Joined: May 10, 2008
    Posts: 662

    Keep
    Member

    Is it your drill press? If so do you have a slow speed attachment for it?

    If not you can make one up pretty cheap, if you have a center post that you can use. Pics of the press anywhere?
     
  22. Cali4niaCruiser
    Joined: Aug 30, 2005
    Posts: 521

    Cali4niaCruiser
    Member

    I've never heard of a slow speed attachment. How would you do this? I'm very interested!


    Posted from the TJJ App for iPhone & iPad
     
  23. TheMonkey
    Joined: May 11, 2008
    Posts: 314

    TheMonkey
    Member
    from MN


    I seen a guy had air supply attached to 3/16" mounted brake line with an end that is sort of flexible pointed at the cutting area on a tube notcher that uses hole saws. He swears that he doesnt have any more wear on the saws since he switched to air from lube and of course no oil mess.
     
  24. 19-c
    Joined: Jun 15, 2009
    Posts: 1,097

    19-c
    Member

    I used a regular 7/8" drill bit from Menards it was $8.00 I have drilled 3 axles with it, superbells and socal axles, and they drilled like butter. Used cutting oil. I guess I never unserstood why people were having so much trouble with this??
     
  25. putz
    Joined: Jan 22, 2007
    Posts: 614

    putz
    Member
    from wisc.

    i use a step drill , clamp it , drill press ...........
     
  26. 296 V8
    Joined: Sep 17, 2003
    Posts: 4,666

    296 V8
    BANNED
    from Nor~Cal

    There’s not a thing wrong with using standard drills
    The key to the entire thing is the speed or lack of it. The usual run of the mill drill press turns way to fast even at its slowest.
    Im lucky to have a very old and very powerful one at work iv drilled dozens of forged axles with .
    I would never even consider hole saws on that drill press … reg drills work that well because of the low speed and I know how to sharpen a drill.

    Cast axles? .. you could drill them with a sharp rock on a stick their so soft
     
  27. choptvan
    Joined: Mar 19, 2010
    Posts: 2,161

    choptvan
    Member

    I do not. But it is a craftsman. Better than I had before anyway.
     
  28. ago
    Joined: Oct 12, 2005
    Posts: 2,199

    ago
    Member
    from pgh. pa.

    You should get the speed 300 rpm or less, less would help. I don't see a problem with cutting oil, so what little mess. DON'T use oil for automobiles. Cutting oil is entirely different. Air is ok too. You will need to make a counter shaft with multiple pulleys to slow speed down, or use a tread mill motor with vari speed. When in doubt machining, slow the speed down. cutters and drills last longer. especially in stainless steel.



    Ago
     
  29. flthead
    Joined: Jan 13, 2013
    Posts: 43

    flthead
    BANNED
    from Midwest

    Great info in this thread.
     

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