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Technical What fuses are these?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by thebearded1!, Mar 16, 2019.

  1. thebearded1!
    Joined: Apr 27, 2018
    Posts: 134

    thebearded1!
    Member
    from Maryland

    What do you call these fuses and where can you find them? 15527672428751533280325.jpg
     
  2. 28dreyer
    Joined: Jan 23, 2008
    Posts: 1,076

    28dreyer
    Member
    from Minnesota

    Common German fuse used in early VW-s and other German cars and perhaps other European as well.
     
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  3. maneri
    Joined: Dec 8, 2009
    Posts: 180

    maneri
    Member
    from ohio

    nailed it (6 mins)
     
    tommyd likes this.
  4. Yep, European fuses. Used at various points by just about all of them. IIRC, the size range isn't quite as wide as the SAE fuses used here, but it's close.
     
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  5. junkyardjeff
    Joined: Jul 23, 2005
    Posts: 6,970

    junkyardjeff
    Member

    I have some if you need more,my mom had a couple VW beatles and still have fuses for them.
     
  6. G-son
    Joined: Dec 19, 2012
    Posts: 485

    G-son
    Member
    from Sweden

    Bosch type fuse, seems to often be called torpedo fuse in english. Shouldn't be too hard to find.

    Don't really like them, bad connection against the fuse holder a bit too often.
     
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  7. Klusterfökken
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2019
  8. bigdog
    Joined: Oct 30, 2002
    Posts: 449

    bigdog
    Member

    We've got them at O'reillys.
     
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  9. TrailerTrashToo
    Joined: Jun 20, 2018
    Posts: 241

    TrailerTrashToo
    Member

    I had them in 1960's Volvos. Occasionally spin the fuse a couple of turns in the holder, that brakes thru the corrosion that forms at the fuse ends.

    Long term solution is a partial re-wire using a late model fuse holder.
     
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  10. clem
    Joined: Dec 20, 2006
    Posts: 2,152

    clem
    Member

    Just use a glass type fuse if you can’t find any.
     
  11. TrailerTrashToo
    Joined: Jun 20, 2018
    Posts: 241

    TrailerTrashToo
    Member

    Glass fuses will not fit in the European style holder.
     
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  12. clem
    Joined: Dec 20, 2006
    Posts: 2,152

    clem
    Member

    Ok. Thanks.
    My only experience with them is with tractors, and I don’t recall any problems.
    Maybe I was using the European type fuse in a glass holder type and not the other way around.
    My apologies.
     
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  13. gimpyshotrods
    Joined: May 20, 2009
    Posts: 15,784

    gimpyshotrods
    Member

    There are glass fuses with torpedo ends.
     
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  14. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 2,032

    edwardlloyd
    Member
    from Germany

  15. thebearded1!
    Joined: Apr 27, 2018
    Posts: 134

    thebearded1!
    Member
    from Maryland

    Great thanks for all the replies guys! I'm probably going to look into just replacing the fuse block with one that holds the glass tubes or even blades.
     
  16. TrailerTrashToo
    Joined: Jun 20, 2018
    Posts: 241

    TrailerTrashToo
    Member

    Thanks, my turn to learn something new.
     
  17. Halfdozen
    Joined: Mar 8, 2008
    Posts: 558

    Halfdozen
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    The fuse holder is two parallel tabs with holes in them, the pointed ends of the fuse fit into the holes in the tabs. This results in a very small contact area at both ends, problematic for high current six volt systems. As TrailerTrashToo said, you need to roll them in the holder regularly to maintain contact, just wait till the circuits have been off for a while as the fuse can get quite hot. I had lots of frustrating experience with these in '60's Volkswagens...
     
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  18. stuart in mn
    Joined: Nov 22, 2007
    Posts: 1,616

    stuart in mn
    Member

    They should be available at any auto parts store. Otherwise, harvest some from an older BMW, Mercedes, VW, etc. at the salvage yard.
     
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  19. gimpyshotrods
    Joined: May 20, 2009
    Posts: 15,784

    gimpyshotrods
    Member

    I used to have a few small drawers of these, back in my Porsche days.
    upload_2019-3-17_12-7-56.png

    The "open air" style are still in regular production, and can be had online, for cheap, by the handful.
     
  20. Atwater Mike
    Joined: May 31, 2002
    Posts: 9,149

    Atwater Mike
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    In a 'pinch', some fellows have substituted 'rounds' from .22 long rifle.
    Watch your inseams and crotches... could get a real 'bang' outa that.
     
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  21. clem
    Joined: Dec 20, 2006
    Posts: 2,152

    clem
    Member

    I personally would go with the blades, because as time goes on the older type will only get harder to find.
    Even though it’s not traditional.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2019
  22. clem
    Joined: Dec 20, 2006
    Posts: 2,152

    clem
    Member

    The ones pictured above with the torpedo ends were the more common ones down here ( New Zealand) before the blade type took over.
    Probably where the confusion comes into it.
    Our stuff back in the ‘60s - ‘70s was mostly European.
     
  23. Rich S.
    Joined: Jul 22, 2016
    Posts: 232

    Rich S.

    Tip towards the firewall is preferable.


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
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