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What are these? Some sort of dampers?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by INJUNTOM, Dec 6, 2012.

  1. INJUNTOM
    Joined: Jun 11, 2006
    Posts: 548

    INJUNTOM
    Member

    Not sure what these are or where I got them. They seem to have a lot of dampening when pulling out but take no effort at all to go in...
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Uh..shocks?????

    A lot of fluid filled shocks are soft to push in but hard to pull back
     
  3. INJUNTOM
    Joined: Jun 11, 2006
    Posts: 548

    INJUNTOM
    Member

    Just the opposite. Slow rise, fast drop.
     

  4. INJUNTOM
    Joined: Jun 11, 2006
    Posts: 548

    INJUNTOM
    Member

    They look like shocks, but would suck at that job. Virtually no resistance going in.

    I'm guessing they are supposed to be that way because someone masked them and started painting.
     
  5. bigblock69n
    Joined: Oct 30, 2009
    Posts: 63

    bigblock69n
    Member

    They look like the shocks i put on the front of my car. They are drag shocks that work that way to hold the front end down
     

  6. No....let me say this.those look like link pin empi vw shocks.they are Hard to pull but push in with little resistance.I personaly used them before and they did a Great job of dampening.shock doesn't have to be strong both ways to work well.think about how it acts WITH a spring
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2012
  7. Andy
    Joined: Nov 17, 2002
    Posts: 4,770

    Andy
    Member

  8. This is a trick question right?

    They pull out stiff to dampen rebound. I have heard them called boingers before but I think the real name is shock absorbers.
     
  9. ems customer service
    Joined: Nov 15, 2006
    Posts: 2,580

    ems customer service
    Member

    fyi, certain industrail machines, material handling equipment, etc will have custom made shocks for very specific application.
     
  10. seb fontana
    Joined: Sep 1, 2005
    Posts: 7,065

    seb fontana
    Member
    from ct

    No brand or number on them?
     
  11. el Scotto
    Joined: Mar 3, 2004
    Posts: 4,438

    el Scotto
    Member
    from Tracy, CA

    The short one is "Rusty".

    The long one is "Tapey".

    ;)
     
  12. mart3406
    Joined: May 31, 2009
    Posts: 3,055

    mart3406
    Member
    from Canada

    Hmm?? I don't think they're normal
    automotive shock absorbers. To me,
    they look and sound much more like
    "flux capacitors"! If you can find a
    part number on them anywhere, see
    if, by any chance, it cross-references
    a Delorian part number! If so, the
    mystery's solved!!:eek::eek::eek::eek::D
     

  13. If so can someone send me back to '73 so I can not enlist? Or if I do at least have the common sense to be a cook. :D
     
  14. Eslope T
    Joined: Sep 11, 2012
    Posts: 21

    Eslope T
    Member

    Ski shocks for snow machines work that way, little resistance on collapse, high resistance extending. I found some nice, shiny, small sized ones, that looked good on my bucket, but you could tell it wasn't going to work.
     
  15. chaos10meter
    Joined: Feb 21, 2007
    Posts: 2,191

    chaos10meter
    Member
    from PA.

    Boy do you have that right.
    When we were drafted in 66, I went to armor then combat infantry training, my buddy went to cook school , he became a baker, he had the world by the ass.
    Nobody fucks with the cooks.
     
  16. INJUNTOM
    Joined: Jun 11, 2006
    Posts: 548

    INJUNTOM
    Member

    Just checked and found no numbers
     
  17. Not only did he have the world by the ass he probably wasn't too worried about getting his shot off. I went to survival training after being a boot then hooked up with a recon unit. We didn't have a cook but we did have our own personal corpsman. It wasn't long before I would have given a months script just to see a cook. ;)
     
  18. They are fluid/oil filled shocks to the originals poster.end of story.cent believe this thread is real or even still open
     
  19. INJUNTOM
    Joined: Jun 11, 2006
    Posts: 548

    INJUNTOM
    Member

    Ok, Mr. obvious, I guessed they were shocks or dampers of some sort (lucky guess?), but would like to know the application. :D
     
  20. Snow mobile? Volks wagon? Corvair?
     
  21. They are used on those things with the 4 wheels.ya know those things ya get in and make those 'vroom vroom' noises :D
     
  22. Yes as I was saying.they are most likely link pin vw front shocks.and I BELIEVE those are the 'drop' shocks.
     
  23. INJUNTOM
    Joined: Jun 11, 2006
    Posts: 548

    INJUNTOM
    Member

    Look way to short to fit on my '61 Buggy:

    BTW, I do appreciate the participation...
     

    Attached Files:

  24. WOW - this thread is unreal.
    First, yes they are some sort of shock or damper (synonymous words in automotive). I can't believe that question was even asked on the HAMB, take that back, these days I do believe it.
    Second, if they have no compression damping and lots of rebound, they are either shot, cheap junk, or a very weird application.
    Third, they are TOO SHORT for a lowered VW King/Link pin front 9.5" compressed, 14.5" extended is normal for a LOWERED VW front - and if anything you want MORE compression damping on a lowered front end to make up for the lack of travel to keep from bottoming out.
    Fourth, no one is going to be able to tell you what they fit from a picture without parts numbers or accurate lengths
     
  25. INJUNTOM
    Joined: Jun 11, 2006
    Posts: 548

    INJUNTOM
    Member

    Wow! God is on the HAMB?
     
  26. el Scotto
    Joined: Mar 3, 2004
    Posts: 4,438

    el Scotto
    Member
    from Tracy, CA

    He'd need to be to identify your fucking shocks, because no mortal human is gonna know!! :eek:
     
  27. Rusty O'Toole
    Joined: Sep 17, 2006
    Posts: 9,601

    Rusty O'Toole
    Member

    Normal hydraulic shocks are supposed to have no resistance when hitting a bump (jounce) but resistance when the wheel is going back down (rebound).

    In other words those are regular old fashioned shock absorbers. What kind of car they came off of, your guess is as good as anybody's unless you can find a part number.
     
  28. Nonsense!
    When the car wheel encounters a bump in the road and causes the spring to coil and uncoil, the energy of the spring is transferred to the shock absorber through the upper mount, down through the piston rod and into the piston. Orifices perforate the piston and allow fluid to leak through as the piston moves up and down in the pressure tube. Because the orifices are relatively tiny, only a small amount of fluid, under great pressure, passes through. This slows down the piston, which in turn slows down the spring.

    Shock absorbers work in two cycles -- the compression cycle (AKA Jounce, or Bump) and the extension cycle (AKA rebound). The compression cycle occurs as the piston moves downward in the shock body, compressing the hydraulic fluid in the chamber below the piston. The extension cycle occurs as the piston moves toward the top of the pressure tube, compressing the fluid in the chamber above the piston. A typical car or light truck will have more resistance during its extension cycle than its compression cycle, but will have resistance in both directions. The compression cycle controls the motion of the vehicle's unsprung weight, while extension controls the heavier, sprung weight.
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2012
  29. chevyburb
    Joined: Apr 17, 2006
    Posts: 169

    chevyburb
    Member

    When I worked in a service station (check oil, wash windows & check tire pressure) in the 1962 ( gas was $.23 a gallon, but we gave commercial accounts a $.02 discount) we had a Monroe shock absorber display. It consisted of a 50gal. drum filled with concrete and mounted on the lid were 2 shock absorbers with a handle attached to each. You could move the worn shock back and forth with ease, but the new shock would compress easily, but you really had to pull the handle to get it back out. Let the spring do it's job THEN absorb the rebound.
     

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